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Popular Neutrophils News and Current Events, Neutrophils News Articles.
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Neutrophil nanosponges soak up proteins that promote rheumatoid arthritis
Engineers have developed neutrophil 'nanosponges' that can safely absorb and neutralize a variety of proteins that play a role in the progression of rheumatoid arthritis. Injections of these nanosponges effectively treated severe rheumatoid arthritis in two mouse models. Administering the nanosponges early on also prevented the disease from developing. The nanosponges are nanoparticles of biodegradable polymer coated with the cell membranes of neutrophils, a type of white blood cell. (2018-09-03)

How do ketogenic diets affect skin inflammation?
Not all fats are equal in how they affect our skin, according to a new study in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, published by Elsevier. The investigators found that different ketogenic diets impacted skin inflammation differently in psoriasiform-like skin inflammation in mice. Ketogenic diets heavy in medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) such as coconut, especially in combination with omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil and plant sources like nuts and seeds, exacerbated psoriasis. (2019-10-17)

Study shows how H. pylori causes white blood cells to morph
Veterans Affairs researchers and colleagues in Iowa showed in a lab study how neutrophils -- the most prevalent type of white blood cell -- undergo changes when infected by the common pathogen H. pylori. The team is the first to demonstrate such changes in cells isolated from human blood. (2017-03-09)

New method divides patients with ulcerative colitis in groups
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have found a way of using gene expression conserved across species to divide patients with the inflammatory bowel disease ulcerative colitis into two distinct groups. The findings are published in the journal Nature Communications, and the researchers hope that the method can also be used to subdivide other autoimmune diseases. (2019-06-28)

Lung study points to therapies for chronic coughing disease
Fresh insights into a potentially life-threatening lung disease that causes persistent coughing could pave the way for new therapies. Scientists at the University of Edinburgh have discovered how the disease impairs key cells of the immune system, leaving patients prone to repeated lung infections caused by bacteria such as pneumonia. (2018-06-13)

A new mechanism in the control of inflammation
Researchers at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC) have discovered a new inflammation control mechanism that shows how the damage caused by the immune response can be controlled. (2018-10-18)

In cases when patients under anesthesia experience anaphylaxis, hyperactive immune...
A study of 86 patients reveals how drugs used for anesthesia can induce life-threatening anaphylaxis (a dangerous type of allergic reaction) through an alternative immune pathway. (2019-07-10)

Anaphylactic shock: IgG antibodies and neutrophils play an unexpected role
Teams from the Institut Pasteur, Inserm, the Paris Public Hospital Network (AP-HP), the CNRS, Paris-Sud University and Sorbonne University have successfully identified a new pathological mechanism responsible for the unexplained cases of anaphylactic shock, involving neutrophils activated by antibodies of the IgG class. These findings, published on July 10, 2019 in the journal Science Translational Medicine, will help improve diagnosis and treatment for patients with this type of shock. (2019-07-10)

A deeper look at severe asthma yields NET results
A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital published this week in Science Immunology models allergic lung inflammation and provides new insights into how asthma develops and progresses, with important implications for the most clinically advanced drugs designed to treat severe asthma. (2018-08-03)

Mitochondrial troublemakers unmasked in lupus
Mitochondria could provoke the inflammation characteristic of lupus, an autoimmune disorder affecting the joints, skin, heart and brain. Byproducts of cells' power stations goad certain white blood cells into making mesh traps as a precursor to cell death. Mitochondrial DNA is spewed out, triggering a warning and a response that can damage various organ tissues. Mouse studies suggest this disease mechanism might respond to potential drug therapies. (2016-01-21)

COVID-19 - The virus and the vasculature
In severe cases of COVID-19, the infection can lead to obstruction of the blood vessels in the lung, heart and kidneys. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have now shown that activated immune cells and blood platelets play a major role in these pathologies. (2020-08-07)

Colorful bacteria more dangerous
A new study in the July 18 issue of The Journal of Experimental Medicine shows that gold-colored bacteria are more harmful than their unpigmented relatives. A group of scientists led by Victor Nizet (UCSD, San Diego, CA) have discovered that the molecules that give certain bugs their color also help them resist attack by immune cells called neutrophils. (2005-07-11)

A mechanism that makes infants more likely than adults to die from sepsis is discovered
Scientists at the Center for Research on Inflammatory Diseases (CRID) show why pediatric patients with sepsis suffer from more inflammation and organ injury than adults. New treatment strategies may be tested. (2019-07-03)

Mass. General team discovers channels connecting skull bone marrow to brain surface
A new study from a Massachusetts General Hospital research team has made two surprising discoveries -- that immune system cells responding to a stroke or other brain injury in an animal model are more likely to come from bone marrow in the skull and that tiny, previously unknown channels through the skull's inner layer carry inflammatory cells from the marrow directly to the outer layers of the the membranes covering the brain (2018-08-27)

Cell's recycling team helps sound alarm on pathogens
Autophagy recycles materials in the cell and is also an efficient method of eliminating viruses, bacteria, and parasites. However, for fungal invaders, Duke researchers have found that the cleanup crew takes a less straightforward approach. Rather than killing fungal invaders directly, autophagy is used to chew up a molecule that would otherwise hold back the immune response. It's sort of like breaking the glass on an alarm to allow the button to be pushed. (2015-01-22)

Excessive lung release of neutrophil DNA traps may explain severe complications in Covid-19 patients
Researchers from the University of Liège (Belgium) has detected significant amounts of DNA traps in distinct compartments of the lungs of patients who died from Covid-19. These traps, called NETs, are released massively into the airways, the lung tissue and the blood vessels. Such excessive release could be a major contributor to severe disease complications leading to in-hospital death. These results are published this week in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. (2020-09-14)

What makes psoriasis sore: Novel role of immune system in the disease
More than 130 million people around the globe suffer from psoriasis vulgaris, a chronic condition characterized by skin inflammation, scales, and dry patches. However, its pathology is not fully clear. In a recent study, dermatology researchers from Japan have uncovered a complex cellular mechanism responsible for the onset of psoriasis and highlighted potential therapeutic targets for future treatment. (2020-12-03)

Winning the arms race: Analysis reveals key gene for bacterial infection
Researchers at Osaka University applied molecular evolutionary analysis to quantify the severity of negative selection pressures on genes encoding the pneumococcal choline-binding proteins (CBPs). They found particularly strong selective constraints on the gene cbpJ, suggesting its importance for bacterial infection. Further analyses revealed its role in bacterial evasion of host neutrophils, suggesting CbpJ's value as a target for drugs against streptococci. (2019-03-11)

Hormone involved in obesity is a risk factor for sepsis
A group of scientists from Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC), led by Luís Moita, discovered that a hormone that has been pointed out as a treatment for obesity reduces the resistance to infection caused by bacteria and is a risk factor for sepsis. (2020-06-22)

New muscular dystrophy drug target identified
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have discovered that muscle cells affected by muscular dystrophy contain high levels of an enzyme that impairs muscle repair. This finding provides a new target for potential drug treatments for the disease, which currently has no cure. (2016-06-01)

Myocarditis: Overshooting the mark
Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have shown that a protein called midkine, a member of the class of signaling molecules known as cytokines, is a key driver of inflammation in the heart muscle that can lead to heart failure in patients with myocarditis. (2019-01-28)

How a sleeping cancer awakens and metastasizes
Scientists at CSHL have determined one of the ways in which cancers in remission can spring back into action. This knowledge has inspired a new treatment idea designed to prevent cancer recurrence and metastasis. (2018-09-27)

New anti-inflammatory agents can control inflammatory responses to fungal infection
The most frequent fungal threat to humans, Candida albicans, is a common cause oral and genital infection. The fungal infections are often worsened by overwhelming inflammatory responses in the body and cause high mortality among risk groups. Umeå University doctoral student Ava Hosseinzadeh has discovered two novel anti-inflammatory agents, an antioxidant and an anti-inflammatory molecule, which could be used to control the hyper-inflammatory responses to the fungal infection. (2016-01-11)

Scientists discover an immune 'clock' that controls infections and cardiovascular disease
CNIC researchers have demonstrated the existence of an immune 'clock' that coordinates day/night cycles through the activity of a class of leucocytes called neutrophils. (2019-01-29)

Immune cells in skin kill MRSA bacteria before they enter the body
A type of immune cell called neutrophils could be responsible for controlling bacterial numbers of an antibiotic-resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on human skin before the bacteria get a chance to invade, according to a new study from Karolinska Institutet published in Cell Reports. The results could provide an explanation for why this superbug is only carried transiently by some people. (2019-10-29)

Hitting HIT: Heparin therapy
Heparin is widely used as an anticoagulant, but evokes in some patients a potentially life-threatening condition called HIT. Clinical scientists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have now shown that inhibition of a single enzyme may markedly reduce this risk. (2019-12-20)

New cause of COVID-19 blood clots identified
A new study reveals that COVID-19 triggers production of antibodies circulating through the blood, causing clots in people hospitalized with the disease. (2020-11-02)

Mass. General study finds how getting enough sleep reduces cardiovascular disease risk
Getting enough sleep is key to good health, and studies have shown that insufficient sleep increases the risk of serious problems, including cardiovascular disease. Now Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have discovered one way that sleep protects against the development of atherosclerosis. (2019-02-13)

How Candida albicans exploits lack of oxygen to cause disease
Scientists from Umeå university have shown how the yeast Candida albicans can modulate and adapt to low oxygen levels in different body niches to cause infection and to harm the host. Studying adaption to hypoxic or anoxic niches is particularly fruitful, since it helps us to understand the pathogenicity of C. albicans and promotes the development of better therapy approaches. Details about the study can be found in a report recently published in the journal MBio, a publication of the American Society of Microbiology. (2019-01-15)

Anticancer drug can spur immune system to fight infection
Imatinib, an example of a 'targeted therapy' against cancer, or related drugs might be tools to fight a variety of infections. (2015-04-01)

To resolve inflammation, location matters
A single protein can both restrain the initiation of inflammation and help to actively resolve it, according to new research led by George Hajishengallis of the University of Pennsylvania and Triantafyllos Chavakis of Technical University of Dresden. They found that the type of cell that secretes the protein determines which activity the protein promotes. (2018-11-19)

Function of neutrophils during tumor progression unraveled
Researchers at The Wistar Institute have characterized the function of neutrophils, a type of white blood cells, during early stages of tumor progression, showing that they migrate from the bone marrow to distant sites and facilitate tumor cell seeding and establishment of metastasis. Importantly, these neutrophils don't possess the immunosuppressive characteristics of polymorphonuclear myeloid-derived suppressor cells (PMN-MDSC). (2018-10-15)

Why obesity predisposes to severe respiratory failure
A hormone that regulates blood sugar levels may be the key to reducing the risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome in obese patients. (2015-06-12)

Enzyme involved in glucose metabolism promotes wound healing, study finds
An enzyme involved in glucose metabolism in cells plays a major role in the early steps of wound healing, a finding that could lead to new therapeutic approaches for wound care, according to researchers at Georgia State University. (2016-03-10)

Scientists take a journey into the lungs of mice infected with influenza
A new tool they call FluVision allows UW-Madison researchers to witness influenza infection in a living animal in action, helping them better understand what happens when a virus infects the lungs and the body responds. (2018-06-25)

The dual and unknown function of the immune system
A new study led by CNIC researcher Andrés Hidalgo and published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine shows that in addition to its defense function and the associated damage to affected tissues, the immune system also plays an important role in the day-to-day function of healthy organs. The research results show that the immune cells called neutrophils help to maintain the normal function of healthy tissues (2018-10-18)

Longer neutrophil lifespan may contribute to HIV-associated intestinal inflammation
The increased survival of white blood cells called neutrophils is associated with alterations in the intestinal microbiome of HIV-infected individuals, according to a study published April 11 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Nichole Klatt of the University of Miami, and colleagues. Moreover, the findings suggest that Lactobacillus bacteria, which are commonly in probiotics, may reduce neutrophil lifespan, and could be an effective therapeutic strategy to reduce intestinal inflammation in HIV-infected individuals. (2019-04-11)

Researchers watch in real time as fat-encased drug nanoparticles invade skin cells
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published today in the journal ACS Nano describes the use of cutting-edge microscopy technology to visualize how liposomes escape from blood vessels into surrounding cells in a living mouse, offering clues that may help researchers design better drug delivery systems. (2017-10-18)

From Dr. Jekyll to Mr. Hyde of cancer immunotherapy
Novel immunotherapies can strengthen the body's own defenses against cancer cells. Treatment of patients with advanced disease can promote partial and complete tumor regressions. However, such strategies also frequently fail. The underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. An international research team led by the University Hospitals of Magdeburg and Bonn has now discovered a previously unrecognized braking mechanism that limits the efficacy of cancer immunotherapies. The results provide a scientific basis to further develop cancer immunotherapy. (2017-10-18)

The body's street sweepers
A new study by medical researchers at LMU extends the list of tasks performed by the smallest blood cells known as platelets: At sites of infection, actively migrating platelets sweep bacteria into aggregates for disposal by phagocytic cells. (2017-12-18)

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