Popular Newborns News and Current Events

Popular Newborns News and Current Events, Newborns News Articles.
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Maternal chronic disease linked to higher rates of congenital heart disease in babies
Pregnant women with congenital heart defects or type 2 diabetes have a higher risk of giving birth to babies with severe congenital heart disease and should be monitored closely in the prenatal period, according to a study published in CMAJ. (2016-10-11)

New research lights up chronic bacterial infection inside bone
A new study describes how live animal imaging allows researchers to visualize chronic bacterial infection in the bone marrow of mice. (2008-12-22)

Study explores safety of rear-facing car seats in rear impact car crashes
Experts know that rear-facing car seats protect infants and toddlers in front and side impact crashes, but they are rarely discussed when it comes to rear-impact collisions. Because rear-impact crashes account for more than 25 percent of all accidents, researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center conducted a new study to explore the effectiveness of rear-facing car seats in this scenario. (2018-04-03)

45 percent of parents experience depression, anxiety and stress when newborns leave NICU
Almost half of parents whose children were admitted to Children's National Health System's neonatal intensive care unit experienced postpartum depressive symptoms, anxiety and stress when their newborns were discharged from the hospital. (2017-09-15)

How does diet during pregnancy impact allergies in offspring?
A small percentage of women said they consumed fewer allergens during pregnancy to stave off food allergies in their newborns, according to preliminary research Karen Robbins, M.D., presented during the American College of Asthma Allergy and Immunology 2018 Annual Scientific Meeting. (2018-12-14)

A candidate genetic factor for the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure has been found
Researchers at the University of Helsinki have found a genetic variation, which associates with the damage caused by maternal alcohol consumption. This genetic variation clarifies the role of genetic factors in the alcohol-induced developmental disorders and could be useful in future diagnostics. (2017-10-05)

Health indicators for newborns of breast cancer survivors may vary by cancer type
In a study published in the International Journal of Cancer, researchers from the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center analyzed health indicators for children born to young breast cancer survivors in North Carolina. (2018-02-05)

Hundreds of fossilized eggs sheds light on pterosaur development
An invaluable collection of more than 200 eggs is providing new insights into the development and nesting habits of pterosaurs. (2017-11-30)

Music helps to build the brains of very premature babies
In Switzerland, 1% of children are born 'very prematurely.' These children are at high risk of developing neuropsychological disorders. To help the brains of these newborns develop as well as possible despite the stressful environment of intensive care, researchers (UNIGE/HUG) propose an original solution: music written especially for them. And the first results are surprising: medical imaging reveals that the neural networks of premature infants who have listened to this music are developing much better. (2019-05-27)

Resiliency in NICU parents may be linked to lower depression and anxiety
Parents of vulnerable newborns in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) who feel less resilient may experience more symptoms of psychological distress, including depression and anxiety. A snapshot from an ongoing cross-sectional study exploring this relationship was presented during the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference & Exhibition. (2018-11-05)

Induced labor after 39 weeks in healthy women may reduce the need for cesarean birth
In a study presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's (SMFM) annual meeting, researchers unveiled findings that suggest that induction of labor at 39 weeks of gestation among healthy, first-time mothers reduces the rate of cesarean birth as compared to expectant management among the same population. (2018-02-01)

The bacteria building your baby
Australian researchers have laid to rest a longstanding controversy: is the womb sterile? Published in Frontiers in Microbiology, their study used uniquely rigorous contamination controls to confirm that exposure to bacteria begins in the womb -- and could help to shape the developing fetal immune system, gut and brain. (2019-06-05)

In vitro fertilization linked with increased risk of congenital heart defects
A new analysis of published studies found a 45 percent increased risk of congenital heart defects in newborns when women become pregnant via in vitro fertilization (IVF)/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) than through spontaneous conception. (2017-11-22)

Can good blood sugar control during labor benefit offspring of diabetic mothers?
Hypoglycaemia, or low blood sugar, is a common and potentially serious outcome in newborns whose mothers were diabetic during pregnancy. Clinicians have wondered whether good blood sugar control during labour might reduce the risk that newborns will have hypoglycaemia. (2018-01-08)

Which targeted nutritional approaches can bolster micro-preemies' brain development?
The volume of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and calories consumed by very vulnerable preemies significantly contributes to increased brain volume and white matter development, however additional research is needed to determine specific nutritional approaches that best support these infants' developing brains, according to research to be presented during the Pediatric Academic Societies 2018 annual meeting. (2018-05-05)

Placental ALLO levels rise during pregnancy and peak as fetuses approach full term
The placenta ramps up ALLO production in the second trimester of pregnancy and achieves peak production just as fetuses approach full term, according to multi-institutional research presented during the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) 2018 annual meeting. (2018-05-05)

Women who give birth in winter or spring less likely to have postpartum depression
Women who give birth in winter or spring are less likely than women who deliver in the fall or summer to suffer from postpartum depression (PPD), suggests a study of more than 20,000 women. The study also found that women who delivered babies at a higher gestational age (further along in their pregnancy) were less likely to develop PPD, and women who did not have anesthesia, such as an epidural, during delivery had an increased risk. (2017-10-22)

Blood flow altered in brains of preterm newborns vs. full-term infants
Cerebral blood flow of key regions of newborns' brains is altered in very premature infants and may provide an early warning sign of disturbed brain maturation well before such injury is visible on conventional imaging, according to a prospective, observational study published Dec. 4, 2017 in The Journal of Pediatrics. (2017-12-04)

Depression among parents of newborns can persist 6 months after NICU discharge
Young parents who have less education and care for more than one child are more likely to have persistent symptoms of depression that linger six months after their newborn is discharged from the neonatal intensive care unit, according to a Children's National Health System research presentation during the Pediatric Academic Societies 2018 annual meeting. (2018-05-05)

Protection against Malaria: A matter of balance
A balanced production of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines at two years of age protects against clinical malaria in early childhood, according to a study led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by ''la Caixa'' Foundation. The results also indicated that early exposure to the parasite does not affect the risk of developing the disease, although it could affect the parasite-specific immune response later in life. (2018-11-14)

Breast milk & babies' saliva shape oral microbiome
Newborn breastfed babies' saliva combines with breastmilk to release antibacterial compounds that help to shape the bacterial communities (microbiota) in babies' mouths, biomedical scientists have found. (2018-11-08)

Study raises expectations for improved language skills in the deaf and hard-of-hearing
Universal screening of newborns for hearing loss before they leave the hospital is not enough to improve language skills of children who are deaf and hard of hearing. At least 40 percent of children with a hearing loss have the capacity for higher language levels -- beyond what test scores indicate. (2017-09-25)

Surgery before pregnancy linked to increased risk of opioid withdrawal in babies
Babies whose mothers underwent surgery before pregnancy had an increased risk of opioid withdrawal symptoms at birth, found a new study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-07-15)

BabySeq project explores impacts of genetic disease testing in newborns
In the era of increasingly common genomic sequencing, an effort called the BabySeq Project aims to explore the medical, behavioral, economic, and ethical impacts of adding genetic testing to the roster of newborn screenings. Some of the first findings from the project are being reported Jan. 3 in the American Journal of Human Genetics. (2019-01-03)

Preterm babies may suffer setbacks in auditory brain development, speech
Preterm babies born early in the third trimester of pregnancy are likely to experience delays in the development of the auditory cortex, a brain region essential to hearing and understanding sound, a new study reveals. Such delays are associated with speech and language impairments at age 2, the researchers found. (2018-01-15)

Gently stroking babies before medical procedures may reduce pain processing
Researchers found that gently stroking a baby seems to reduce activity in the infant brain associated with painful experiences. Their results, appearing Dec. 17 in the journal Current Biology, suggest that lightly brushing an infant at a certain speed -- of approximately 3 centimeters per second -- could provide effective pain relief before clinically necessary medical procedures. (2018-12-17)

Anti-malaria drug shows promise as Zika virus treatment
California researchers have discovered that a medication used to prevent and treat malaria may also be effective for Zika virus. The drug, called chloroquine, has a long history of safe use during pregnancy, and is relatively inexpensive. The research was published today in Scientific Reports. (2017-11-17)

Healthy diet could decrease gestational diabetes risk for South Asian women
Research was based on data from the START Birth Cohort study, which includes more than 1,000 women in their second trimester of pregnancy. (2017-08-10)

Early diagnosis can save babies' lives: A guide to severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID)
The review, published in CMAJ, is aimed at pediatricians, family physicians and other doctors who may treat newborns, including those who appear healthy at birth but begin to get severe, repeated infections requiring emergency department visits. (2017-12-18)

Low vitamin D levels at birth linked to higher autism risk
Low vitamin D levels at birth were associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) at the age of 3 years in a recent Journal of Bone and Mineral Research study. (2017-11-29)

Children with asymptomatic brain bleeds as newborns show normal brain development at age 2
A study by UNC researchers finds that neurodevelopmental scores and gray matter volumes at age two years did not differ between children who had MRI-confirmed asymptomatic subdural hemorrhages when they were neonates, compared to children with no history of subdural hemorrhage. (2020-10-30)

Fathers of American newborns keep getting older, Stanford study finds
While data on the moms of newborn American children has been abundant, equivalent data on dads hasn't -- a gap that Stanford scientists have now filled. (2017-08-31)

Group B streptococcus test for pregnant women: advantage of universal screening unclear
Informative studies are still lacking for the comparison with the currently used risk-based strategy. (2019-02-05)

Air pollution may shorten telomeres in newborns -- a sign of increased health risks
A study conducted before and after the 2004 closure of a coal-burning power plant in Tongliang, China, found children born before the closure had shorter telomeres than those conceived and born after the plant stopped polluting the air. (2018-01-24)

EPO protects preemies' brains by modifying genes essential for generating new brain cells
Genetic analyses conducted by a multi-institutional research team finds that EPO may work its neuroprotective magic by modifying genes essential for regulating growth and development of nervous tissue as well as genes that respond to inflammation and hypoxia. (2018-05-05)

Surgery before pregnancy linked to higher risk of opioid withdrawal in babies
Babies whose mothers underwent surgery before pregnancy have an increased risk of opioid withdrawal symptoms at birth, according to a new study done by Dr. Nathalie Auger, researcher at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM), and published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. (2019-07-15)

The molecules that energize babies' hearts
A metabolic process that provides heart muscle with energy fails to mature in newborns with thickened heart walls, according to a Japan-Canada research team. (2018-06-14)

In HIE, lower heart rate variability signals stressed newborns
In newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, lower heart rate variability correlates with autonomic manifestations of stress shortly after birth, underscoring the importance of this reading as a valuable biomarker, according to Children's research presented during the Pediatric Academic Societies 2019 Annual Meeting. (2019-04-27)

Pain-relief drug may prevent lung problems, blindness in premature infants
A popular pain-relief drug may prevent lung and eye disorders common in premature infants, a UC Irvine College of Medicine study has found. (2002-10-19)

'The Brazilian Zika outbreak could end soon'
Scientists have elucidated the Zika burden in a Brazilian metropolis. Their data indicate: the outbreak may be coming to an end and further outbreaks in the region seem unlikely. The study has also provided new evidence supporting the link between Zika infection during pregnancy and malformations in newborns. A third finding is important with regard to intervention measures: Zika virus infection predominantly affects poor regions. (2017-11-16)

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