Popular Nitrate News and Current Events

Popular Nitrate News and Current Events, Nitrate News Articles.
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Team discovers a significant role for nitrate in the Arctic landscape
Because of the very low nitrate levels found in arctic tundra soil, scientists had assumed that plants in this biome do not use nitrate. But a new study co-authored by four Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) Ecosystems Center scientists challenges this notion. The study has important implications for predicting which arctic plant species will dominate as the climate warms, as well as how much carbon tundra ecosystems can store. (2018-03-23)

New research suggests toward end of Ice Age, human beings witnessed fires larger than dinosaur killers
12,800 years ago, thanks to fragments of a comet, humans saw an astonishing 10 percent of the Earth's land surface, or about 10 million square kilometers, consumed by fires. (2018-02-01)

Vertical measurements of air pollutants in urban Beijing
Scientists from CAS Institute of Atmospheric Physics use vertically resolved observation system based on the Beijing 325m Meteorological Tower to gain an in-depth understanding of the vertical evolution characteristics of air pollutants within urban boundary layer.They find that that the temperature inversion coupled by the interactions of different air masses elucidated the 'blue sky -- haze' co-existent phenomenon. (2018-03-02)

Cleaner air may be driving water quality in Chesapeake Bay
A new study suggests that improvements in air quality over the Potomac watershed, including the Washington, D.C., metro area, may be responsible for recent progress on water quality in the Chesapeake Bay. Scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science have linked improving water quality in streams and rivers of the Upper Potomac River Basin to reductions in nitrogen pollution onto the land and streams due to enforcement of the Clean Air Act. (2016-07-26)

Measure of age in soil nitrogen could help precision agriculture
What's good for crops is not always good for the environment. Nitrogen, a key nutrient for plants, can cause problems when it leaches into water supplies. University of Illinois engineers developed a model to calculate the age of nitrogen in corn and soybean fields, which could lead to improved fertilizer application techniques to promote crop growth while reducing leaching. (2016-07-25)

Large source of nitrate, a potential water contaminant, found in near-surface desert soils
A University of California, Riverside-led study has found that soils under desert pavement have an unusually high concentration of nitrate, a type of salt, close to the surface. Vulnerable to erosion by rain and wind if the desert pavement is disrupted, this vast source of nitrate could contaminate surface and groundwaters, posing an environmental risk. (2008-02-29)

University of Minnesota study shows wetlands provide landscape-scale reduction in nitrate pollution
A study by University of Minnesota researchers provides new insights to demonstrate that multiple wetlands or 'wetland complexes' within a watershed are extremely effective at reducing harmful nitrate in rivers and streams. (2018-01-31)

Illinois River water quality improvement linked to more efficient corn production
In a new University of Illinois study, nitrate concentrations and loads in the Illinois River from 1983 to 2014 were correlated with agricultural nitrogen use efficiency and nitrate discharged from Chicago's treated wastewater. The amount of nitrate that flowed down the river each year from 2010 to 2014 was 10 percent less than the average amount during a baseline period of 1980 to 1996. This reduction is a positive step toward the ultimate goal to reduce nitrate concentrations by 45 percent. (2016-05-10)

Salty snow could affect air pollution in the Arctic
In pictures, the Arctic appears pristine and timeless with its barren lands and icy landscape. In reality, the area is rapidly changing. Scientists are working to understand the chemistry behind these changes to better predict what could happen to the region in the future. One team reports in ACS' Journal of Physical Chemistry A that sea salt could play a larger role in the formation of local atmospheric pollutants than previously thought. (2016-10-12)

Deformation control and mass transfer in the tunic of Halocynthia roretzi
It has been previously reported that the tunic of Halocynthia roretzi, mainly composed of cellulose, is actively deformed with mass transfer by the mechanical stimuli. In this study, how the tunic deforms in response to the mechanical environment was investigated. (2018-06-15)

New water-quality data on impact of corn, soybeans on nitrate in Iowa streams
As Iowa farmers have planted more acres of corn to meet the demand driven by the corn-based ethanol industry, many models predicted that nitrate concentrations in Iowa streams would increase accordingly. However, recent University of Iowa research based on water monitoring and published in the Journal of Soil and Water Conservation casts doubt on these predictions. (2016-05-24)

New approach to improve nitrogen use, enhance yield, and promote flowering in rice
Using nitrogen fertilizer increases crop yields, but excess runoff causes environmental pollution. Moreover, in grains such as rice, large amounts of nitrogen fertilizer can delay flowering, leaving the crop vulnerable to late-season cold weather. A recent study in The Plant Cell identified a rice nitrate transporter that can be overexpressed to increase grain yield and accelerate flowering. This approach has the potential to improve grain yields while avoiding the downside of late maturation. (2018-02-23)

New study sheds light on evolutionary origin of oxygen-based cellular respiration
Researchers at the RIKEN SPring-8 Center in Harima, Japan have clarified the crystal structure of quinol dependent nitric oxide reductase, a bacterial enzyme that offers clues on the origins of our earliest oxygen-breathing ancestors. In addition to their importance to fundamental science, the findings provide key insights into the production of nitrogen oxide, an ozone-depleting and greenhouse gas hundreds of times more potent than carbon dioxide. (2012-01-22)

Beetroot juice supplements may help certain heart failure patients
Beetroot juice supplements may help enhance exercise capacity in patients with heart failure, according to a new proof-of-concept study. Exercise capacity is a key factor linked to these patients' quality of life and even survival. (2018-02-22)

Topsy-turvy currents key to removing nitrate from streams, UCI-led study finds
More than 500 years ago, Leonardo da Vinci sketched what he called 'la turbolenza,' comparing chaotic swirls atop flowing water to curly human hair. It turns out those patterns influence myriad phenomena, from the drag on an airplane's wings and the formation of Jupiter's red spot to the rustling of tree leaves. (2018-03-15)

Squishy supercapacitors bathed in green tea could power wearable electronics
Wearable electronics are here -- the most prominent versions are sold in the form of watches or sports bands. But soon, more comfortable products could become available in softer materials made in part with an unexpected ingredient: green tea. Researchers report in ACS' The Journal of Physical Chemistry C a new flexible and compact rechargeable energy storage device for wearable electronics that is infused with green tea polyphenols. (2017-02-15)

Sensor strategy a boon for synthetic biology
Rice University synthetic biologists have invented a technology to dial up or down the sensitivity of bacterial biosensors. Researchers say the technique could enable the engineering of tailor-made biosensors for diagnostic gut bacteria, detection of environmental pollutants or automated control of nutrient levels in soil. (2018-04-13)

The connection between nitrogen utilization and groundwater quality is clear
A new study based on 70 years of monitoring data highlights the importance of a consistent national groundwater monitoring program and the need for development of future effective nitrogen mitigation measures in intensive agriculture worldwide in order to protect groundwater resources. (2017-09-26)

Why cereal is better
Cereal is much more drought-tolerant than other plants. Researchers from Würzburg have now found out why that is so. Their insight could help breed crops that are more resistant to drought. (2018-04-27)

Radish cover crop traps nitrogen; mystery follows
New research supports the use of radish as a cover crop as a trap crop for fall nitrogen. However, what happens to that nitrogen afterward remains unknown. (2018-05-30)

Bold new approaches needed to shrink Gulf of Mexico dead zone and meet elusive goals
Shrinking the annual Gulf of Mexico 'dead zone' down to the size of Delaware will require a 59-percent reduction in the amount of nitrogen runoff that flows down the Mississippi River from as far away as the Corn Belt. (2017-07-31)

Energized fabrics could keep soldiers warm and battle-ready in frigid climates
Soldiering in arctic conditions is tough. Protective clothing can be heavy and can cause overheating and sweating, while hands and feet can grow numb. To keep military personnel more comfortable, scientists are trying to create high-tech fabrics that heat up when powered and that capture sweat. These fabrics could conceivably be used in future consumer clothing. The researchers will present their results today at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2017-08-20)

Rice U.'s one-step catalyst turns nitrates into water and air
Engineers at Rice University's Nanotechnology Enabled Water Treatment (NEWT) Center have found a catalyst the cleans toxic nitrates from drinking water by converting them into air and water. (2018-01-04)

Study says salt marshes have limited ability to absorb excess nitrogen
Results suggest that society can't simply rely on salt marshes to clean up nutrient pollution, but instead needs to do a better job at keeping nutrients out of the water in the first place. (2016-11-28)

African lake provides new clues about ancient marine life
New research shows there may have been more nitrogen in the ocean between one and two billion years ago than previously thought, allowing marine organisms to proliferate at a time when multi-cellularity and eukaryotic life first emerged. (2017-01-31)

Gulf of Mexico 'dead zone' forecasted to exceed the size of Connecticut
Scientists have predicted the dead zone, or area with little to no oxygen in the northern Gulf of Mexico, will become larger than the state of Connecticut by the end of July, according to a new report. While there are more than 500 dead zones around the world, the northern Gulf of Mexico dead zone is the second largest human-caused coastal hypoxic area in the world. (2018-06-07)

Computer chips found to possess explosive properties useful for chemical analysis and nanoscale sensors
Chemists at the University of California, San Diego have discovered that silicon wafers, the raw starting material for computer chips, can be easily made into tiny explosives that might be used one day to chemically analyze samples in the field or serve as power sources for tiny electronic sensors the size of a speck of dust. (2002-01-09)

Study shows wetlands provide landscape-scale reduction in nitrogen pollution
In agricultural regions such as the US Midwest, excess nitrate from crop fertilizer makes its way into rivers and streams through subsurface drainage channels and agricultural ditches. (2018-01-29)

Nitrogen pollution's path to streams weaves through more forests (and faster) than suspected
A USDA Forest Service scientist and 29 co-authors completed one of the largest and longest examinations to trace unprocessed nitrate movement in forests. The team found that some nitrate occasionally moves too fast for biological uptake, resulting in 'unprocessed' nitrate bypassing the otherwise effective filter of forest biology. (2019-03-15)

Everything in moderation
In efforts to curb our use of greenhouse gas-generating fossil fuels, plant-based biofuels are among the top contenders as alternative liquid energy sources for transportation. However, strategies to produce high yields of biomass for fuels are not a one-size-fits-all proposition, according to a study led by UC Santa Barbara professor of ecology David Tilman. (2019-02-01)

UNH researchers find unexpected impact of hurricanes on Puerto Rico's watershed
Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found unprecedentedly high levels of nitrate, an essential plant nutrient, in streams and watersheds of Puerto Rico for a year after two consecutive major hurricanes in 2017. This high amount of nitrate may have important climate change implications that could harm forest recovery and threaten ecosystems along Puerto Rico's coastline by escalating algal blooms and dead zones. (2018-12-10)

Simple green synthesis is a breath of fresh air
A method for creating nanoparticles without using solvents could lead to environment-friendly electronics. (2017-11-06)

Oral microbiome and anthropometry changes following caries arrest using silver-nitrate/fluoride-varnish
At the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Hailey Taylor, University of California, San Francisco, presented an oral session titled 'Oral Microbiome and Anthropometry Changes Following Caries Arrest Using Silver-Nitrate/Fluoride-Varnish.' The AADR/CADR Annual Meeting is in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., USA from March 21-24, 2018. (2018-03-22)

Infection biology: Gut microbe helps thwart Salmonella
LMU researchers have identified a bacterial species in the gut microbiome of the mouse which protects against infection by human-pathogenic Salmonella. (2019-04-18)

Artificial sweeteners in groundwater indicate contamination from septic systems
The presence of artificial sweeteners in rural groundwater shows evidence for contamination by local septic system wastewater, researchers from the University of Waterloo have found. (2017-11-07)

Scientists measure storm impact on river pollution
A team of scientists have won over £1 million to monitor the effect of storms on pollution in a river-estuary in Hampshire. (2012-09-03)

Virus decimates algal blooms
As soon as the pest algae run out of nutrients, viruses attack and abruptly end the algal bloom. This is revealed in a three-year international study under the leadership of the Netherlands Institute for Sea Research. This knowledge opens up opportunities for using natural enemies to remove algal blooms in isolated areas. (2002-11-15)

Bacteria may supercharge the future of wastewater treatment
Wastewater treatment plants have a PR problem: People don't like to think about what happens to the waste they flush down their toilets. But for many engineers and microbiologists, including the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Daniel Noguera and Katherine McMahon, these plants are a hotbed of scientific advances. (2017-05-31)

Changing how we view chlorine in soil
Researchers at Linköping University have studied how combinations of different environmental factors affect the chlorination of organic matter in soils. The results show that the supply of fresh organic compounds, which promote the growth of the microorganisms, increases chlorination. The discovery could mean that chlorine in ecosystems has a different significance than previously believed. (2018-01-10)

Draining peatlands gives global rise to greenhouse laughing-gas emissions
Drained fertile peatlands around the globe are hotspots for the atmospheric emission of laughing-gas - a powerful greenhouse gas called nitrous oxide, which is partly responsible for global warming and destruction of the ozone layer, a new study shows. (2018-03-28)

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