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Popular Nitrogen News and Current Events, Nitrogen News Articles.
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Team discovers a significant role for nitrate in the Arctic landscape
Because of the very low nitrate levels found in arctic tundra soil, scientists had assumed that plants in this biome do not use nitrate. (2018-03-23)
NUS-led study: Beltway to divert diesel trucks in Sao Paulo improved public health
A study by researchers from the National University of Singapore and the University of Sao Paulo revealed that a beltway constructed to divert heavy-duty diesel vehicles traffic in the Brazilian city of Sao Paulo has reduced public health damage associated with exposure to diesel. (2018-04-27)
Paving the way for hydrogen fuel cells
The hype around hydrogen fuel cells has died down, but scientists have continued to pursue new technologies that could enable such devices to gain a firmer foothold. (2017-06-28)
Small but versatile
The ammonia oxidizing archaea, or Thaumarchaeota, are amongst the most abundant marine microorganisms. (2018-12-10)
Protein in, ammonia out
A recent study has compiled and analyzed data from 25 previous studies. (2016-06-29)
Alfalfa loss? Annual ryegrass is a win
In the U.S., alfalfa is grown mainly in western and northern states. (2018-01-03)
Quantifying the greenhouse gas footprint of crop cultivation
The GHG footprint is an index used to indicate the climate change impact potential exerted by crop production. (2017-12-06)
Climate game changer
New research from University of Alberta and University of Vienna microbiologists provides unparalleled insight into the Earth's nitrogen cycle, identifying and characterizing the ammonia-oxidizing microbe, Nitrospira inopinata. (2017-08-23)
Unexpected environmental source of methane discovered
Roughly 10 percent of nitrogen-fixing microorganisms contain the genetic code for manufacturing a back-up enzyme, called iron iron-only nitrogenase, to do their job. (2018-01-15)
Bacteria are individualists
Cells respond differently to lack of nutrients. (2016-05-12)
Diamonds coupled using quantum physics
Researchers at TU Wien have succeeded in coupling the specific defects in two such diamonds with one another. (2017-04-10)
Light green plants save nitrogen without sacrificing photosynthetic efficiency
Scientists designed plants with light green leaves with hopes of allowing more light to penetrate the crop canopy and increase overall light use efficiency and yield. (2017-11-20)
Submerged aquatic vegetation return is sentinel of Chesapeake Bay ecosystem recovery
A new research article published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences analyzes the positive impact of long-term nutrient reductions on an important and valuable ecosystem in the Chesapeake Bay. (2018-03-05)
New studies add to understanding of treatments for Barrett's esophagus
The October issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy features several new studies evaluating various treatments for Barrett's esophagus (BE). (2017-10-06)
Bacterial mechanism converts nitrogen to greenhouse gas
Cornell University researchers have discovered a biological mechanism that helps convert nitrogen-based fertilizer into nitrous oxide, an ozone-depleting greenhouse gas. (2016-12-06)
Ribbed mussels could help improve urban water quality
Ribbed mussels can remove nitrogen and other excess nutrients from an urban estuary and could help improve water quality in other urban and coastal locations, according to a study in New York City's Bronx River. (2017-11-22)
Nitrogen is a neglected threat to biodiversity
Nitrogen pollution is a recognized threat to sensitive species and ecosystems. (2016-02-24)
Research outlines the interconnected benefits of urban agriculture
A team of researchers led by Arizona State University and Google has assessed the value of urban agriculture and quantified its benefits at global scale. (2018-01-10)
Because of agriculture, the Gulf of Mexico will suffocate for decades longer
Nitrogen runoff has created a massive oxygen-deprived 'dead zone' in the Gulf of Mexico, but even if the runoff was completely eliminated, it would still take at least 30 years for the area to recover, a new study estimates. (2018-03-22)
Yale study offers new paradigm on ecosystem ecology
Predators have considerably more influence than plants over how an ecosystem functions, according to a Yale study published today in Science. (2008-02-14)
Cleaning up aquatic pollution with mussels
Scientists and activists alike have been looking for a solution to the problem of aquatic nutrient pollution. (2017-11-08)
Heavy nitrogen molecules reveal planetary-scale tug-of-war
Researchers from Rice University, UCLA, Michigan State and the University of New Mexico have discovered a planetary-scale tug-of-war between life, deep Earth and the upper atmosphere that is expressed in atmospheric nitrogen. (2017-11-17)
Fixing the role of nitrogen in coral bleaching
A unique investigation highlights how excess nitrogen can trigger coral bleaching in the absence of heat stress. (2017-06-05)
Systems biology approach identifies nutrient regulation of biological clock in plants
Using a systems biological analysis of genome-scale data from the model plant Arabidopsis, an international team of researchers identified that the master gene controlling the biological clock is sensitive to nutrient status. (2008-03-14)
Researchers discover greenhouse bypass for nitrogen
An international team discovers that production of a potent greenhouse gas can be bypassed as soil nitrogen breaks down into unreactive atmospheric N2. (2017-01-18)
FSU researchers: Savanna fires pump Central African forests full of nitrogen
Florida State University researchers are part of a global team of scientists revealing the unexpected role that large-scale fires and high nitrogen deposition play in the ecology and biogeochemistry of these lush Central African forests. (2018-02-08)
Large source of nitrate, a potential water contaminant, found in near-surface desert soils
A University of California, Riverside-led study has found that soils under desert pavement have an unusually high concentration of nitrate, a type of salt, close to the surface. (2008-02-29)
Successful synthesis of gamma-lactam rings from hydrocarbons
IBS scientists have designed a novel strategy to synthesize ring-shaped cyclic molecules, highly sought-after by pharmaceutical and chemical industries, and known as gamma-lactams. (2018-03-01)
New quantum states for better quantum memories
How can quantum information be stored as long as possible? (2016-11-23)
Researchers put the bite on mosquitoes
Few things sting like a mosquito's bite -- especially if that bite carries a disease such as malaria, yellow fever, Dengue fever or West Nile virus. (2008-01-16)
Cleaner air may be driving water quality in Chesapeake Bay
A new study suggests that improvements in air quality over the Potomac watershed, including the Washington, D.C., metro area, may be responsible for recent progress on water quality in the Chesapeake Bay. (2016-07-26)
World War I-era maps help track history of kelp forests in Pacific Northwest
A UChicago ecologist compared maps produced before World War I to recent surveys of kelp forest in the Pacific Northwest, and finds they have been relatively stable over the past century. (2017-12-20)
Northern lakes respond differently to nitrogen deposition
Nitrogen deposition caused by human activities can lead to an increased phytoplankton production in boreal lakes. (2017-02-06)
Corn yield modeling towards sustainable agriculture
Researchers use a 16 year field-experiment dataset to show the ability of a model to fine-tune optimal nitrogen fertilizer rates, and identify five ways it can inform nitrogen management guidelines. (2016-12-14)
Measure of age in soil nitrogen could help precision agriculture
What's good for crops is not always good for the environment. (2016-07-25)
When birds of a feather poop together
Algal blooms deplete oxygen in lakes, produce toxins, and end up killing aquatic life in the lake. (2017-05-17)
New catalyst meets challenge of cleaning exhaust from modern engines
Researchers have created a catalyst capable of reducing pollutants at the lower temperatures expected in advanced engines. (2017-12-14)
Study boosts hope for cheaper fuel cells
Simulations by Rice University scientists show how carbon nanomaterials may be optimized to replace expensive platinum in cathodes for electricity-generating fuel cells. (2018-01-05)
Acid rain has a disproportionate impact on coastal waters
The release of sulfur and nitrogen into the atmosphere by power plants and agricultural activities plays a minor role in making the ocean more acidic on a global scale, but the impact is greatly amplified in the shallower waters of the coastal ocean, according to new research by atmospheric and marine chemists. (2007-09-07)
Eating your veggies, even in space
Travelling to Mars will require astronauts to grow their own food. (2019-01-04)
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