Popular Nursing News and Current Events

Popular Nursing News and Current Events, Nursing News Articles.
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Mental health and mental disorder recommendation programs
The purpose of this article was to propose mental health and mental disorder recommendation programs, and to recommend policies for policy makers and research investors. (2017-12-11)

Black babies more likely to have nursing care missed in their NICU stay
Everybody wants a healthy life for their baby. Black babies are more likely to be born prematurely, which puts them at risk for death and developmental problems. In fact, a third of all infant deaths are preterm-related. The critical period in preterm babies' lives is when they are just born and are in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The care they receive is vital to a healthy future. (2017-09-18)

Young adults report differing sexual effects from alcohol, marijuana, and ecstasy
Alcohol, marijuana, and ecstasy each have very different sexual effects, from attraction and desire to sensitivity to sexual dysfunction, finds a study by the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research (CDUHR) at NYU Meyers College of Nursing. (2018-01-10)

Relation of key determinants affecting mental health disorders in greater mekong subregion
This article is a literature review of the relationship of the determinants affecting GMS mental disorders conducted using the defined strategies (2017-11-29)

Mental health issues linked to risky driving in newly licensed teens
Mental health symptoms related to attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and conduct disorder are associated with increased errors in a driving simulator and self-reported risky driving behaviors in adolescents, according to study in Nursing Research, published by Wolters Kluwer. (2018-03-27)

Relationship found between HIV risk and individual and community level educational status
African-American men who have sex with men (MSM) remain at heightened risk for HIV infection and account for the largest number of African-Americans living with HIV/AIDS. It has long been understood that there is a clear and persistent association between poverty, transactional sex behavior, and HIV risk. A new University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) study has investigated how educational status relates to HIV risk in this population. (2017-09-18)

Linking teen driving behaviors to ADHD, other mental health factors
Teen drivers are three times more likely to get into a fatal crash than their more-experienced, older counterparts. Research led by Catherine McDonald and Thomas Power of the University of Pennsylvania, found a link between mistakes these new drivers make and self-reported ADHD and other inattention disorders. (2018-03-30)

Nursing homes should require flu shots for all staff and patients, most older adults say
As flu season swings into high gear, a new poll suggests nursing homes and other long-term care facilities should be doing more to get their staff and patients vaccinated before it's too late. Nearly three-quarters of people over age 50 surveyed in a new poll say all staff in such facilities should definitely be required to get the flu vaccine. More than 60 percent say that patients in such facilities should definitely get vaccinated too. (2018-01-03)

Can sleep quality and burnout affect shift-work nurses' job performance?
In a Journal of Advanced Nursing study, female gender and personal burnout were linked with impaired sleep quality among nurses. (2017-11-22)

Testing HIV testers
An innovative study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) used a youth-driven mystery shopper methodology to assess YMSM's testing experiences in three metropolitan cities highly impacted by the HIV epidemic. Similar to the announced standardized patient evaluation used in medical training, mystery shopping is used to evaluate healthcare delivery in community settings. Results showed variable performance across cities and testing sites, underscoring the importance of improving HIV testing services for this highly HIV-affected demographic. (2019-10-29)

Algorithm shows differences between nurse, doctor care
A multidisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago has published the first quantitative study on the divergent scopes of practice for nurses and doctors. The study uniquely leveraged computer science technology to compare individual-level patient care provided by nurses and doctors using information routinely documented in the electronic health record. (2018-03-08)

Hospitals in Medicare ACOs reduced readmissions faster
The Accountable Care Organization model of paying for health care appears to help reduce hospital readmissions among Medicare patients discharged to skilled nursing facilities, a new study suggests. (2017-01-09)

Language matters in end-of-life conversations
In general, the term 'medical futility' applies when, based on data and professional experience, no further treatments, procedures or tests will provide benefit and may, in fact, be more burdensome and create undue suffering for the patient and the patient's family. (2018-02-02)

Proxies who watch advanced care planning video more likely to withhold feeding tubes
Researchers from Hebrew SeniorLife's Institute for Aging Research (IFAR) and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have discovered that nursing home residents with advanced dementia are more likely to have advance directives that indicate they did should not get feeding tubes after their proxies viewed a 12-minute video on advance care planning. (2018-06-04)

Study says some nursing homes gaming the system to improve their Medicare star ratings
A new study of nursing homes in California, the nation's largest system, by faculty at Florida Atlantic University and the University of Connecticut, found that some nursing homes inflate their self-assessment reporting to improve their score in the Five-Star Quality Rating System employed by Medicare to help consumers. (2018-01-17)

Warm showers and ball exercises may help women during childbirth
A new International Journal of Nursing Practice study demonstrates that during childbirth, women may benefit from warm showers, perineal exercises with a ball, or the combination of both strategies. (2018-03-07)

Can lavender aromatherapy reduce anxiety in surgery patients?
Lavender aromatherapy reduced preoperative anxiety in a study of ambulatory surgery patients undergoing procedures in general otolaryngology. (2017-11-08)

People with diabetes visit the dentist less frequently despite link between diabetes, oral health
Adults with diabetes are less likely to visit the dentist than people with prediabetes or without diabetes, finds a new study led by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and East Carolina University's Brody School of Medicine. (2018-04-02)

Quality of life predicts cancer survival, U-M study finds
Head and neck cancer patients who reported lower physical quality of life were more likely to die from their disease, according to a new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center. The findings could mean that identifying patients with poor quality of life could also identify patients with particularly aggressive tumors. (2008-05-29)

Study examines urinary tract infections and antibiotic use in nursing homes
In a Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study of nursing homes in the tropics, one in five residents had received antibiotics within the last 30 days. Also, urinary tract infection (UTI) accounted for 40 percent of all infections treated with antibiotics within the last 30 days. (2018-01-10)

Active shooter simulations increase emergency department staff readiness and confidence
A new practice improvement initiative and study indicates active shooter training and simulations are vital to ensuring staff is equipped to respond effectively should their emergency department ever become a target for such an act of violence. (2018-08-27)

More support needed for nurses facing mistreatment at work
New research suggests that nurses need more help dealing with disrespectful behavior from colleagues if patient care is to be maintained. The study, led by Dr. Roberta Fida from the University of East Anglia, argues that in order to retain high quality nurses it is important to understand what factors might protect them from the negative effects of workplace mistreatment. (2016-10-18)

Patient satisfaction with pain management linked to nurse staffing
Hospital patients' satisfaction with pain management is linked to nurse staffing, according to an article authored by nurse researchers from the Connell School of Nursing at Boston College and published in the journal Pain Management Nursing. (2017-09-06)

Need for enhanced nursing and post-acute transitional care models for rising obesity levels
Elderly, chronically ill people experience frequent changes in health status that require transitions among health care providers and settings. Significant attention has been focused on coordinated transitional care models that assure continuity of care, prevention of hospital readmission, avoidance of complications, and close clinical treatment and management. But specific transitional needs of obese people who need to be transferred to nursing homes for post-acute care are often overlooked. (2017-09-26)

Core elements identified for successful transitions in care for older adults with dementia
While there has been an increased focus on person-centered models of care transition for cognitively intact older adults from hospital to home, little is known about the core elements of successful transitions in care specifically for persons with dementia. (2018-03-15)

Does obesity lead to more nursing home admission and a lower quality of care?
In a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, researchers examined the care that obese older adults receive when they are admitted to nursing homes. (2016-05-31)

PTSD rate among prison employees equals that of war veterans
Prison employees experience PTSD on par with Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans, a new study from a Washington State University College of Nursing researcher found. (2018-07-13)

Parenting stress associated with epigenetic differences in African American mothers
Parenting can be stressful - and this stress may be influencing the DNA methylation of African American mothers, finds a new study led by NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing published in the Journal of Clinical and Translational Science. (2018-03-12)

Understanding barriers to mental health care for urban black men who experience trauma
Psychological distress is common in the aftermath of a traumatic injury. Symptoms of depression and post-traumatic stress can make it harder to re-establish one's social and family life, work performance, and wellbeing after injury. (2018-04-12)

Study examines differences in hip fracture rates among nursing homes
In a nationally representative study, researchers found considerable variation in the rates of hip fractures across US nursing home facilities. The Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study identified a number of modifiable facility-level characteristics that might be addressed, but the majority of the variation in the risk of hip fracture remained unexplained. (2018-01-22)

Health insurance associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease among aging immigrants
Aging immigrants' risk for cardiovascular disease may be heightened by their lack of health insurance, particularly among those who recently arrived in the United States, finds a study led by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing. The findings are published in the Journal of Nursing Scholarship. (2019-03-19)

Brief psychotherapy benefits women caring for children with severe health issues
Brief cognitive behavioral therapy significantly improved the mental health of women overwhelmed by caring for children with severe chronic health conditions, researchers at the University of Louisville have found. After five therapy sessions, study participants reported significantly decreased depressive symptoms, negative thinking and chronic stressors, and experienced improved sleep quality, according to Lynne Hall, Dr.P.H., R.N., associate dean of research and professor at the UofL School of Nursing. (2018-09-14)

What impact do medication errors have on nursing home residents?
A new analysis points to surprisingly low rates of serious impacts from medication errors affecting nursing home residents, despite the fact that these errors remain fairly common. The investigators noted that it's unclear whether medication errors resulting in serious outcomes are truly infrequent or are under-reported due to the difficulty in ascertaining them. The findings are published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. (2016-11-21)

Diagnosing the impacts of health policy
KAUST shows a new statistical technique offers a better way to gauge the effectiveness of complex healthcare interventions. (2017-11-20)

Ice chips only? Study questions restrictions on oral intake for women in labor
At most US maternity units, women in labor are put on nil per os (NPO) status -- they're not allowed to eat or drink anything, except ice chips. But new nursing research questions that policy, showing no increase in risks for women who are allowed to eat and drink during labor. The study appears in the March issue of the American Journal of Nursing, published by Wolters Kluwer. (2018-02-23)

Research in AJN shows increase in private and public place infant abductions
The American Journal of Nursing announced today results from a study, based on 23 years of data collection, identifying new trends in nonfamily infant abductions. The report, conducted in partnership with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, showed that while the number of abductions in hospital settings dramatically declined, those from private homes and public places have increased in incidence. Among private home and public place abductions, there has also been an increase in violence and lower infant recovery rates. (2008-09-04)

Changes to nursing home quality ratings system caused consumers to choose better providers
Health care report cards and quality ratings are intended to give consumers more information when choosing a care provider like a hospital or nursing home. Health economist Marcelo Perraillon of the Colorado School of Public Health at CU Anschutz evaluated whether a simplified rating system used by the website Nursing Home Compare motivated consumers to choose better-rated nursing homes. It has been a difficult problem in health economics and policy whether public reporting of quality information actually works in the absence of experimental data. (2018-01-24)

Experts call for better research into link between women's hormones and mood disorders
In a recently published study, women's health experts from the University of Alberta argue there is an urgent need for carefully designed, gender-specific research to better understand the relationship of female sex hormones to mood states and disorders. (2007-12-12)

Risk of long-term disability in older adults who visit the ED
Older adults who go to the emergency department (ED) for an illness or injury are at increased risk for disability and decline in physical abilities up to six months later, according to a study by Yale researchers. (2017-01-06)

Study: Hispanic Americans across ethnicities want HIV testing in Spanish
New University at Buffalo research that investigated the language preferences of Hispanic Americans seeking HIV testing in New York found that the majority of Hispanic patients preferred to receive care in Spanish, even if they were fluent in English. (2018-03-14)

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