Popular Oceanography News and Current Events

Popular Oceanography News and Current Events, Oceanography News Articles.
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Study: Much of the surface ocean will shift in color by end of 21st century
Climate change is causing significant changes to phytoplankton in the world's oceans, and a new MIT study finds that over the coming decades these changes will affect the ocean's color, intensifying its blue regions and its green ones. Satellites should detect these changes in hue, providing early warning of wide-scale changes to marine ecosystems. (2019-02-04)

Nature's smallest rainbows, created by peacock spiders, may inspire new optical technology
The mechanism behind these tiny rainbows may inspire new color technology, but wouldn't have been discovered without research combining basic natural history with physics and engineering. These super iridescent spider scales can be used to overcome current limitations in spectral manipulation, and to reduce the size of optical spectrometers for applications where fine-scale spectral resolution is required in a very small package, notably instruments on space missions, or wearable chemical detection systems. (2018-01-02)

Ocean winds influence seal pup migration
Scientists have confirmed what native Alaskans have observed for centuries -- maritime winds influence the travel patterns of northern fur seal pups. New research presented at the Ocean Sciences Meeting here today shows strong winds can potentially displace seal pups by hundreds of kilometers during their first winter migration. (2018-02-13)

Tasty and pink, sea urchin species may be a climate-tolerant food source
A hardy urchin species shows potential to relieve pressure on more vulnerable species, according to new research by California Sea Grant-funded scientists. (2018-01-31)

Researchers links coastal nuisance flooding to special type of slow-moving oce
A team of international researchers has found a link between seasonal fluctuations in sea level to a long-time phenomenon -- Rossby Waves. And this connection may lead to a new tool to help (2018-07-05)

Self-driving robots collect water samples to create snapshots of ocean microbes
For the first time, scientists from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa (UH Mānoa) and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) will deploy a small fleet of long-range autonomous underwater vehicles (LRAUVs) that have the ability to collect and archive seawater samples automatically. These new robots will allow researchers to track and study ocean microbes in unprecedented detail. (2018-03-08)

Seafloor creatures destroyed by ice action during ice ages
New research by marine scientists at National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (NOC) and the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) will mean that text books will have to be rewritten. They reveal that ice ages were a time of mass destruction as whole communities of animals were wiped out by ice sheets scouring the sea floor. (2005-10-17)

Hurricanes Irma and Maria temporarily altered choruses of land and sea animals
Audio recordings of Hurricanes Irma and Maria's passage over Puerto Rico document how the calls of coastal critters changed in response to the deadly storms. The hurricanes caused a major disruption in the acoustic activity of snapping shrimp, a reduction in insect and bird sounds, and potentially an intensification of fish choruses, according to new research presented at the Ocean Sciences Meeting Friday. (2018-02-15)

Team discovers that wind moves microinvertebrates across desert
The work of faculty and students from The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) has yielded the first evidence of how waterborne microinvertebrates move across vast expanses of arid desert. An article published March 13, 2018 in Limnology and Oceanography Letters, a publication of the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography, details for the first time how high desert winds disperse small invertebrates and how they colonize hydrologically disconnected basins throughout the region. (2018-03-13)

New details emerge on temperature, mobility of earth's lower crust in Rocky Mountains
A research team led by Colorado State University has mapped the temperature and viscosity of earth's lower crust for the first time. (2018-01-17)

New study identifies thermometer for global ocean
There's a new way to measure the average temperature of the ocean thanks to researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego. (2018-01-03)

Black carbon pollution emerges as major player in global warming
Black carbon, a form of particulate air pollution most often produced from biomass burning, cooking with solid fuels and diesel exhaust, has a warming effect in the atmosphere three to four times greater than prevailing estimates, according to scientists in an upcoming review article in the journal Nature Geoscience. (2008-03-23)

Transparent eel-like soft robot can swim silently underwater
An innovative, eel-like robot developed by engineers and marine biologists at the University of California can swim silently in salt water without an electric motor. Instead, the robot uses artificial muscles filled with water to propel itself. The foot-long robot, which is connected to an electronics board that remains on the surface, is also virtually transparent. The team details their work in the April 25 issue of Science Robotics. (2018-04-25)

Scientists present El Nino
The ecological effects of the strong 2015-2016 El Niño. Carbon burial in aquatic ecosystems. The presence of pharmaceuticals in streams. (2017-02-23)

Release of water shakes Pacific Plate at depth
A team of seismologists analyzing the data from 671 earthquakes that occurred between 30 and 280 miles beneath the Earth's surface in the Pacific Plate as it descended into the Tonga Trench were surprised to find a zone of intense earthquake activity in the downgoing slab. The pattern of the activity along the slab provided strong evidence that the earthquakes are sparked by the release of water at depth. (2017-01-11)

Thawing permafrost causing the 'browning' of northern lakes
As ice the melts, the organic carbon found in permafrost is being released once again after ages of confinement in the soil. It is making its way into Arctic and subarctic lakes and ponds, and modifying their composition. The portrait presented by an international team of researchers that includes Professor Isabelle Laurion of INRS shows the influence that thawing permafrost has on surface water biogeochemistry. (2018-03-02)

Native fish species at risk following water removal from the Colorado River
Agriculture and domestic activities consume much of the Colorado River water that once flowed to the Colorado Delta and Northern Gulf of California. The nature and extent of impact of this fresh-water loss on the ecology and fisheries of the Colorado Delta and Gulf of California is controversial. A recent publication in the journal PeerJ reveals a previously unseen risk to the unique local biodiversity of the tidal portion of the Delta. (2017-12-12)

Research uncovers the mysterious lives of narwhals
Narwhals are some of the most elusive creatures in the ocean, spending most of their lives in deep water far from shore. But research being presented at the 2018 Ocean Sciences Meeting here on Monday may shed a bit of light on these enigmatic marine mammals. (2018-02-09)

Study finds parrotfish are critical to coral reef health
In the new study, published in the Jan. 23 issue of the journal Nature Communication, Scripps researchers Katie Cramer and Richard Norris developed a 3,000-year record of the abundance of parrotfish and urchins on reefs from the Caribbean side of Panama to help unravel the cause of the alarming modern-day shift from coral- to algae-dominated reefs occurring across the Caribbean. (2017-01-23)

Key biological mechanism is disrupted by ocean acidification
A team led by scientists from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) has demonstrated that the excess carbon dioxide added to the atmosphere through the combustion of fossil fuels interferes with the health of phytoplankton which form the base of marine food webs. (2018-03-14)

Evidence of glaciation in 'super greenhouse' world
US and European scientists have found evidence that glaciers existed during the (2008-01-10)

Analysis of a 'rusty' lunar rock suggests the moon's interior is dry
The moon is likely very dry in its interior according to a new study from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the UC San Diego analyzing fragments of the 'Rusty Rock,' a rock collected from the moon's surface during the Apollo 16 mission in 1972. (2017-08-21)

Marine monitoring to help protect lives at sea
In order to save lives at sea, the National Oceanography Centre is joining six research organizations to provide a world-class marine monitoring and forecasting service, which could be used to improve marine rescue operations. (2015-06-17)

Snapping shrimp may act as 'dinner bell' for gray whales off Oregon coast
Scientists have for the first time captured the sounds of snapping shrimp off the Oregon coast and think the loud crackling from the snapping of their claws may serve as a dinner bell for eastern Pacific gray whales, according to new research being presented at the Ocean Sciences Meeting here today. (2018-02-13)

UD scientists report ocean data from under Greenland's Petermann Glacier
Based on data from the first UD ocean sensors deployed under Greenland's Petermann Glacier, UD researchers report that the floating ice shelf is strongly coupled, or tied, to the ocean below and to the adjacent Nares Strait. Warming temperatures recorded at the deepest ocean sensors match data from Nares Strait, which connects the Arctic and Atlantic oceans. (2017-02-15)

Good news for fishermen: Browning impacts fish less than expected
Water color is getting darker in lakes across the planet. This phenomenon, known as 'browning,' was anticipated to cause widespread declines in fish populations. A new study by researchers from Umeå University, Sweden, finds that the number of fish populations impacted by browning is smaller than previously believed. (2018-08-08)

Scientists report on latest Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacts
LSU scientists will present new research at the 2017 Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill and Ecosystem Science Conference in New Orleans next week. These experts will be among hundreds of oil spill-related researchers from academia, state and federal agencies, non-governmental organizations and industry, who will share the latest oil spill and ecosystem scientific discoveries, innovations, technologies and policies on Feb. 6-9. (2017-02-02)

Researchers discover volcanic heat source under glacier
A researcher from the University of Rhode Island's Graduate School of Oceanography and five other scientists have discovered an active volcanic heat source beneath the Pine Island Glacier in Antarctica. The discovery and other findings, which are critical to understanding the stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, of which the Pine Island Glacier. (2018-06-26)

New study suggests overfishing in one of world's most productive fishing regions
Scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego used images from satellites and flyovers to count the number of small boats, or pangas, to find that fishing in Gulf of California, which separates Baja California and mainland Mexico, is over capacity. The analysis suggests that future investment in the region's fisheries may not be economically or ecologically viable. (2017-04-25)

Viruses in the oceanic basement
A team of scientists from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) showed for the first time that many novel viruses are present in the fluids circulating deep in the rocky crust of the seafloor known as the ocean basement. Their recently published study also provides evidence that the viruses are actively infecting the many unusual microorganisms that live in the basement. (2017-03-28)

Researchers ask important questions on what happens to oil after a spill
Very little is known about what happens to oil in the ocean after an oil spill and what happens to it once a chemical dispersant has been applied. New research summarizes what is known and what important knowledge gaps remain. (2016-11-21)

Scripps marine research physiologist pioneer to receive lifetime achievement award
Gerald Kooyman, emeritus professor of biology at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, will be the first recipient of a new lifetime achievement award bestowed by the Society for Marine Mammalogy during the society's 16th Biennial Conference on the Biology of Marine Mammals. (2005-12-05)

URI researchers: Small changes in oxygen levels have big implications for ocean life
Oceanographers at the University of Rhode Island have found that even slight levels of ocean oxygen loss, or deoxygenation, have big consequences for tiny marine organisms called zooplankton. (2018-12-19)

Ocean's fiercest predators now vulnerable to extinction
The numbers of many large shark species have declined by more than half due to increased demand for shark fins and meat, recreational shark fisheries, as well as tuna and swordfish fisheries, where millions of sharks are taken as bycatch each year. Now, the global status of large sharks has been assessed by the World Conservation Union, widely recognized as the most comprehensive, scientific-based information source on the threat status of plants and animals. (2008-02-17)

Murky lakes now surpass clear, blue lakes in US
New research reveals that many lakes in the continental United States are becoming murkier, with potentially negative consequences for water quality and aquatic life. The findings are published in Limnology and Oceanography. (2018-08-22)

How mangroves help keep the planet cool
In a new global framework, scientists have developed a more accurate assessment of how mangroves store carbon in their soil. The researchers found that previous studies have underestimated the blue carbon levels in mangroves by up to 50 percent in some regions and overestimated levels by up to 86 percent in others. This study published recently in Nature Climate Change will help countries develop and evaluate their carbon footprint and blue carbon inventory that potentially can be used in the global marketplace. (2018-07-02)

Satellites track vanishing Antarctic ice
Monitoring Antarctica from space has revealed how its ice is being lost to the oceans, providing crucial insight into the continent's response to a warming climate. (2018-06-13)

Rise of aggressive reef predator may impede sea urchin recovery, study finds
A new study suggests that an aggressive reef competitor -- the Threespot Damselfish -- may have impeded the recovery of Caribbean long-spined sea urchin populations after a mysterious disease outbreak caused a massive die-off of these animals over three decades ago. (2017-05-15)

Lower oxygen levels to impact the oceanic food chain
The North Pacific Ocean is losing oxygen, pushing species significant to the marine ecosystem to shallower water where there's more sunlight, higher temperatures and greater risk of predators. (2018-12-19)

Scientists call for more research on how human activities affect the seabed
A group of UK scientists, coordinated by the University of Southampton, has published extensive research into how industry and environmental change are affecting our seafloors, but say more work is needed to help safeguard these complex ecosystems and the benefits they provide to people for the future. (2017-09-25)

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