Popular Osteoporosis News and Current Events

Popular Osteoporosis News and Current Events, Osteoporosis News Articles.
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Wood ash recycling program could help save Muskoka's forests and lakes
Implementing a new residential wood ash recycling program to restore calcium levels in Muskoka's forest soils and lakes could help replenish the area's dwindling supply of crayfish and maple sap, according to new research co-led by York University. (2019-03-28)

Weight loss surgery's effects on bone marrow fat and bone mass
Bone marrow fat is thought to regulate bone metabolism, and high levels of marrow fat are seen in states of low bone mass, severe underweight, and diabetes. (2017-08-09)

Forensic experts compile guide on how to ID child abuse, starvation
Forensic science experts from North Carolina State University have just published a comprehensive overview of forensic research that can be used to identify child abuse and starvation. (2014-01-31)

Ball games and circuit strength training boost bone health in schoolchildren
The type of exercise that children get in school does make a difference. This is shown by a major Danish study from researchers at the University of Southern Denmark and University of Copenhagen. Eight to ten-year-old schoolchildren develop stronger bones, increased muscular strength and improved balance when ball games or circuit training are on the timetable. (2018-02-08)

Scripps Florida scientists unveil 'roadmap' to aid osteoporosis treatment development
Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have developed a molecular model that may provide a new framework for improving the design of osteoporosis treatments. (2017-10-13)

Many stroke patients not screened for osteoporosis, despite known risks
Many stroke survivors have an increased risk of osteoporosis, falls or breaks when compared to healthy people. This study provides further evidence of the importance of identifying risk and initiating treatment to prevent bone loss and fractures in stroke survivors who are at increased risk of osteoporosis. (2019-04-25)

Mind the (osteoporosis treatment) gap!
A new review, referencing key clinical studies, guidelines and audits, outlines the main global challenges (and their solutions) facing healthcare professionals and policymakers responsible for providing care to populations in relation to bone health and fracture prevention. It identifies four main areas/themes responsible for the treatment gap. (2017-02-14)

Analysis examines link between bone turnover markers and fracture risk in osteoporosis trials
Pooled data from 14 osteoporosis clinical trials of anti-resorptive drugs indicate that patients who have reduced levels of two bone turnover markers during treatment have lower risks of later experiencing vertebral fractures. No bone turnover markers were significantly associated with non-vertebral or hip fracture risks, according to the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research analysis. (2018-01-10)

Mediterranean diet is linked to higher muscle mass, bone density after menopause
The heart-healthy Mediterranean diet also appears to be good for an older woman's bones and muscles, a new study of postmenopausal women in Brazil finds. The study results will be presented Monday at ENDO 2018, the Endocrine Society's 100th annual meeting in Chicago, Ill. (2018-03-18)

Many postmenopausal women do not receive treatment for osteoporosis
The benefits of treating osteoporosis in postmenopausal women outweigh the perceived risks, according to a Clinical Practice Guideline issued today by the Endocrine Society. The Society introduced the guideline during a news conference on Monday at ENDO 2019, its annual meeting in New Orleans, La. (2019-03-25)

Estrogen is important for bone health in men as well as women
Although women are four times more likely than men to develop osteoporosis, or porous bone, one in 12 men also suffer from the disease, which can lead to debilitating fractures. In women, low estrogen levels after menopause have been considered an important risk factor for this disorder. Now research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has shown that low amounts of active estrogen metabolites also can increase the risk of osteoporosis in men. (2007-05-10)

HIV RNA expression inhibitors may restore immune function in HIV-infected individuals
Immune activation and inflammation persist in the majority of treated HIV-infected individuals and is associated with excess risk of mortality and morbidity. A new study by Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) researchers suggests that use of HIV RNA expression inhibitors as adjunct therapy might diminish atypical inflammation and restore immune function in HIV-infected individuals on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). (2018-08-27)

Vitamin D deficiency common in patients with IBD, chronic liver disease
The 73rd Annual Scientific Meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology in Orlando found patients with inflammatory bowel disease or chronic liver disease were at increased risk of developing Vitamin D deficiencies. Two separate studies highlight the importance of regular Vitamin D checkups in the evaluation of patients with certain digestive diseases. (2008-10-06)

Researchers describe mechanism that underlies age-associated bone loss
A major health problem in older people is age-associated osteoporosis -- the thinning of bone and the loss of bone density that increases the risk of fractures. Researchers have now detailed an underlying mechanism leading to that osteoporosis. When this mechanism malfunctions, progenitor cells stop creating bone-producing cells, and instead create fat cells. Knowledge of this mechanism can provide targets in the search for novel bone-loss. (2017-09-22)

A link between mitochondrial damage and osteoporosis
In healthy people, a tightly controlled process balances out the activity of osteoblasts, which build bone, and osteoclasts, which break it down. Damage to cells' mitochondria can make that process go awry, according to research led by University of Pennsylvania researchers. The findings shed light on how exposure to cigarette smoke, alcohol, and certain medications and environmental toxins can raise the risk of osteoporosis. (2019-05-09)

Whole genome-sequencing uncovers new genetic cause for osteoporosis
Using one of the world's most extensive genetics data sets, an international research team led by Dr. Brent Richards of McGill University and the Lady Davis Institute at the Jewish General Hospital has identified a novel gene implicated in osteoporosis. (2015-09-14)

New guideline on calcium and vitamin D supplementation
A new evidence-based clinical guideline from the National Osteoporosis Foundation and the American Society for Preventive Cardiology says that calcium with or without vitamin D intake from food or supplements that does not exceed the tolerable upper level of intake should be considered safe from a cardiovascular standpoint. (2016-10-24)

In many countries, bone health may be at risk due to low calcium intake
At a special symposium held today at the World Congress on Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases in Krakow, Poland, experts discussed the findings of the newly launched IOF Global Map of Dietary Calcium Intake in Adults and the implications of low calcium intake for the global population. (2018-04-20)

New study demonstrates toll of anxiety on bone health
Anxiety has already been shown to take its toll on the human body in many ways, including increased risk for heart disease and gastrointestinal disorders. Now a new study demonstrates how anxiety levels are linked to an increased risk of bone fractures in postmenopausal women. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2018-05-09)

Osteoporosis drug may benefit heart health
The osteoporosis drug alendronate was linked with a reduced risk of cardiovascular death, heart attack, and stroke in a Journal of Bone and Mineral Research study of patients with hip fractures. (2018-05-11)

A broken bone may lead to widespread body pain -- not just at the site of the fracture
Breaking a major bone may increase risk of widespread chronic body pain in later life, a new study has found. (2016-01-05)

JBMR perspective: A crisis in the treatment of osteoporosis
The remarkable progress made over the past 30 years to reduce fractures and dramatically improve the quality of life for millions of osteoporosis patients is rapidly being reversed, say two bone health experts in a Journal of Bone and Mineral Research article published online today. (2016-06-23)

Fifteen percent of osteoporosis patients who take 'drug holidays' suffer bone fractures
A Loyola Medicine study has found that 15.4 percent of patients who take so-called 'drug holidays' from osteoporosis drugs called bisphosphonates experienced bone fractures. During a six-year follow-up period, the yearly incidence of fractures ranged from 3.7 percent to 9.9 percent, with the most fractures occurring during the fourth and fifth years. (2018-05-04)

Physical activity in the prevention and treatment of disease
Prescribing physical activity for the purpose of preventing and treating various conditions can now become a reality for health care professionals all over the world. (2010-11-29)

Notch controls bone formation and strength
Notch, a protein known to govern the determination of cell differentiation into different kinds of tissues in embryos, plays a critical role in bone formation and strength later in life, said researchers from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston in a report that appears online today in the journal Nature Medicine. Their findings may provide a basis for understanding osteoporosis and in diseases in which there is too much bone. (2008-02-24)

The developmental origins of osteoporosis
Osteoporosis may have its origins in early life, but the consequences are not apparent until late adult life. (2016-01-26)

First study to examine vitamin D insufficiency in pediatric patients with low bone density
Vitamin D insufficiency is common in adults and is emerging in the world of pediatrics. A mild degree of vitamin D deficiency, also known as vitamin D insufficiency, causes rickets in children and can be treated with increased amount of nutritional vitamin D intake as well as increased sun exposure. (2008-06-02)

Osteoporosis, not just a woman's disease
While osteoporosis prevention and treatment efforts have historically been focused on post-menopausal women, a new study from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center suggests that critical opportunities are being lost by not focusing more attention on bone loss and fracture risk in older men. (2014-11-05)

Low sperm count not just a problem for fertility
A man's semen count is a marker of his general health, according to the largest study to date evaluating semen quality, reproductive function and metabolic risk in men referred for fertility evaluation. The study results, in 5,177 male partners of infertile couples from Italy, will be presented Sunday at ENDO 2018, the Endocrine Society's 100th annual meeting in Chicago, Ill. (2018-03-18)

Osteoporosis is underdiagnosed and undertreated in older men
A new study reveals that many older men who experience a fracture are still underdiagnosed with and undertreated for osteoporosis. Details of the study was presented at ACR Convergence, the American College Rheumatology's annual meeting. (2020-11-06)

Genetic predisposition to later puberty causes lower bone density in children and adults
People whose genetic makeup triggers a later-than-average start to puberty have lower bone mineral density, especially in their lower spine. Because adolescence is a critical period for accruing bone, this effect may increase a person's risk of osteoporosis and bone fractures later in life. (2017-11-27)

Screening could catch a quarter of hip fractures before they happen
Screening for osteoporosis could catch a quarter of hip fractures before they happen. A new study in The Lancet reveals that a simple questionnaire, combined with bone mineral density measurements for some, would help identify those at risk of hip fracture. The research, which involved more than 12,000 older women, found that screening through GP practices allowed patients to be targeted for treatment -- leading to a 28 percent reduction in hip fractures over five years. (2017-12-15)

55-70-year-old women and men with prediabetes get stronger bones with football training
Football scores from all angles for untrained middle-aged and elderly women and men with prediabetes. This is the conclusion from a study carried out in the Faroe Islands by football researchers and physiologists from the Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics at the University of Southern Denmark and the University of the Faroe Islands. (2018-07-27)

Vitamin D deficiency: Common and problematic yet preventable
In a review article to appear in the July 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, Dr. Michael Holick, an internationally recognized expert in vitamin D, provides an overview of his pioneering work that expounds on the important role vitamin D plays in a wide variety of chronic health conditions, as well as suggesting strategies for the prevention and treatment of vitamin D deficiency. (2007-07-18)

A closer look at osteoporosis medication's mechanisms may improve outcomes
Osteoporosis is the primary cause of bone fractures in the elderly, reflecting an imbalance between osteoclasts, bone-degrading cells, and osteoblasts, bone-building cells. Teriparatide is the only FDA-approved treatment for osteoporosis that increases osteoblast activity and lifespan. This week in the JCI, Henry Kronenberg and colleagues at Massachusetts General Hospital report that teriperatide treatment also stimulates the formation of new osteoblasts. However, their findings also show that unexpected adverse effects can develop after treatment stops. (2017-07-31)

Men far less likely to prevent, screen for osteoporosis
While the consequences of osteoporosis are worse in men than women -- including death -- older males are far less likely to take preventive measures against the potentially devastating bone-thinning disease or accept recommendations for screening, according to startling new research by North Shore-LIJ Health System geriatricians. (2015-05-15)

Vitamin D: How much is too much of a good thing?
A three-year study by researchers at the Cumming School of Medicine's McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), showed there is no benefit in taking high doses of vitamin D. More research is required to determine if high doses may actually compromise bone health. (2019-09-03)

The delicate balance of treating growing but brittle bones
Turning off a bone receptor protein could potentially treat osteoporosis in children without affecting bone growth. (2019-02-01)

Fractures have long-term impacts on quality of life in older people
Single and multiple hip, vertebral, and rib fractures strongly affect the quality of life of older adults over a prolonged period of time, according to a new study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. (2019-02-06)

New medication gives mice bigger muscles
Researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, have studied a new group of medicinal products which increase the muscle- and bone mass of mice over a few weeks. This offers hope to the elderly and people suffering from weak muscles and bones due to illness. (2019-03-27)

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