Popular Ozone Layer News and Current Events

Popular Ozone Layer News and Current Events, Ozone Layer News Articles.
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Drip by drip
How do crystals grow? The answer given in current textbooks is: Layer by layer atoms or molecules settle on an existing crystal surface. The research team Physical Chemistry at the University of Konstanz has now observed a preliminary stage of this crystal growth in glutamic acid that contradicts this classical principal of growth. Not individual atoms settle on an existing crystal surface, but nano-drips that already contain building blocks for growth. (2017-06-21)

Micromotors deliver oral vaccines
Vaccines have saved millions of lives, but nobody likes getting a shot. That's why scientists are trying to develop oral vaccines for infectious diseases. But to be effective, the vaccine must survive digestion and reach immune cells within the intestinal wall. Now, researchers reporting in the ACS journal Nano Letters have developed oral vaccines powered by micromotors that target the mucus layer of the intestine. (2019-02-06)

Nano-layer of ruthenium stabilizes magnetic sensors
A layer of ruthenium just a few atoms thick can be used to fine-tune the sensitivity and enhance the reliability of magnetic sensors, tests at NIST show. The nonmagnetic metal acts as a buffer between active layers of sensor materials, offering a simple means of customizing field instruments such as compasses and stabilizing the magnetization in a given direction in devices such as computer hard-disk readers. (2007-08-03)

Doped photovoltaics
Organic solar cells are made of cheap and abundant materials, but their efficiency and stability still lag behind those of silicon-based solar cells. A Chinese-German team of scientists has found a way to enhance the electric conductivity of organic solar cells, which increases their performances. Doping the metal oxide interlayer, which connected the electrode and active layer, with a modified organic dye boosted both the efficiency and stability, the study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie revealed. (2019-08-16)

3D bioprinting technique could create artificial blood vessels, organ tissue
University of Colorado Boulder engineers have developed a 3D printing technique that allows for localized control of an object's firmness, opening up new biomedical avenues that could one day include artificial arteries and organ tissue. (2018-10-22)

Physicists build muscle for shape-changing, cell-sized robots
A Cornell University team has made a robot exoskeleton that can rapidly change its shape upon sensing chemical or thermal changes in its environment. And, they claim, these microscale machines -- equipped with electronic, photonic and chemical payloads -- could become a powerful platform for robotics at the size scale of biological microorganisms. (2018-01-03)

Scientists enter unexplored territory in superconductivity search
Scientists mapping out the quantum characteristics of superconductors -- materials that conduct electricity with no energy loss -- have entered a new regime. Using newly connected tools named OASIS at Brookhaven Lab, they've uncovered previously inaccessible details of the 'phase diagram' of one of the most commonly studied 'high-temperature' superconductors. (2018-12-06)

2-D tin (stanene) without buckling: A possible topological insulator
An international research team led by Nagoya University synthesized planar stanene: 2-D sheets of tin atoms, analogous to graphene. Tin atoms were deposited onto the Ag(111) surface of silver. The stanene layer remained extremely flat, unlike in previous studies wherein stanene was buckled. This leads to the formation of large area, high quality samples. Stanene is predicted to be a topological insulator, with applications in quantum computing and nanoelectronics. (2018-01-19)

New conductive coating may unlock biometric and wearable technology of the future
A team of researchers from the College of Engineering at Texas A&M University have developed a mechanically robust conductive coating that can maintain performance under heavy stretching and bending. (2018-03-09)

NASA visualizes the dance of a melting snowflake
NASA has produced the first three-dimensional numerical model of melting snowflakes in the atmosphere. Developed by scientist Jussi Leinonen of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, the model provides a better understanding of how snow melts can help scientists recognize the signature in radar signals of heavier, wetter snow -- the kind that breaks power lines and tree limbs -- and could be a step toward improving predictions of this hazard. (2018-03-29)

MicroRNA could help treat cancer and asthma
MiR-223 shows promise for treating inflammatory disease. (2018-02-20)

Engineering researchers use laser to 'weld' neurons
University of Alberta researchers have developed a method of connecting neurons, using ultrashort laser pulses -- a breakthrough technique that opens the door to new medical research and treatment opportunities. Neurons are cells in the nervous system that are responsible for transferring information between the brain and the rest of the body. The team is the first ever to find a way to bond neurons and in doing so, is giving researchers a powerful new tool. (2016-02-09)

NASA study: First direct proof of ozone hole recovery due to chemicals ban
For the first time, scientists have shown through direct satellite observations of the ozone hole that levels of ozone-destroying chlorine are declining, resulting in less ozone depletion. (2018-01-04)

Climate change expected to increase premature deaths from air pollution
A new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill estimates that future climate change, if left unaddressed, is expected to cause roughly 60,000 deaths globally in the year 2030 and 260,000 deaths in 2100 due to climate change's effect on global air pollution.    (2017-07-31)

Engineering material magic
University of Utah engineers have discovered a new kind of 2-D semiconducting material for electronics that opens the door for much speedier computers and smartphones that also consume a lot less power. (2016-02-15)

New research suggests toward end of Ice Age, human beings witnessed fires larger than dinosaur killers
12,800 years ago, thanks to fragments of a comet, humans saw an astonishing 10 percent of the Earth's land surface, or about 10 million square kilometers, consumed by fires. (2018-02-01)

New technique produces tunable, nanoporous materials
A collaborative group of researchers describe a new technique for creating novel nanoporous materials with unique properties that can be used to filter molecules or light. (2017-10-26)

Journal AAS publishes first data description paper: Data collection and sharing
AAS published its first data description paper on June 8, 2017. The paper describes two datasets of ultraviolet radiation in China. (2017-06-10)

Semiconductor breakthrough may be game-changer for organic solar cells
In an advance that could push cheap, ubiquitous solar power closer to reality, University of Michigan researchers have found a way to coax electrons to travel much further than was previously thought possible in the materials often used for organic solar cells and other organic semiconductors. (2018-01-17)

Right beneath the skin we all have the same bacteria
In the dermis skin layer, the same bacteria are found across age and gender. This has been shown by researchers from the University of Copenhagen in a new study which has studied skin samples from knees and hips. The researchers hope it is a step in the direction of a better understanding of why skin disorders occur. (2020-02-12)

Study: Reducing greenhouse gas in rocky mountain region has health, financial benefits
Research by Drexel University and the University of Colorado at Boulder suggests that imposing fees on energy producers that emit greenhouse gas could improve the health and financial well-being of the Rocky Mountain region. (2019-07-25)

New properties of sulfur atom discovered
2019 will be, as proclaimed by the UN, the 'International Year of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements', in commemoration of the 150th anniversary of its creation. Researchers from the Faculty of Science of the University of Malaga (UMA) have recently revealed new properties of one of its key elements: sulfur. (2018-12-14)

Genes, ozone, and autism
Exposure to ozone in the environment puts individuals with high levels of genetic variation at an even higher risk for developing autism than would be expected just by adding the two risk factors together, a new analysis shows. The study is the first to look at the combined effects of genome-wide genetic change and environmental risk factors for autism. (2017-06-23)

Adding hydrogen to graphene
IBS researchers report a fundamental study of how graphene is hydrogenated. (2016-11-03)

Beyond graphene: Advances make reduced graphene oxide electronics feasible
Researchers have developed a technique for converting positively charged (p-type) reduced graphene oxide (rGO) into negatively charged (n-type) rGO, creating a layered material that can be used to develop rGO-based transistors for use in electronic devices. (2017-03-30)

Viruses -- lots of them -- are falling from the sky
An astonishing number of viruses are circulating around the Earth's atmosphere -- and falling from it -- according to new research from scientists in Canada, Spain and the US. The study marks the first time scientists have quantified the viruses being swept up from the Earth's surface into the free troposphere, beyond Earth's weather systems but below the stratosphere where jet airplanes fly. The viruses can be carried thousands of kilometres there before being deposited back onto the Earth's surface. (2018-02-06)

New 3-D technology improving patient care for complex kidney surgeries
Surgeons use unique 3-D solution to prepare for complex surgery that includes a glasses-free 3-D monitor in the operating room that allows them to navigate patient's atypical anatomy. (2017-03-09)

Bacterial mechanism converts nitrogen to greenhouse gas
Cornell University researchers have discovered a biological mechanism that helps convert nitrogen-based fertilizer into nitrous oxide, an ozone-depleting greenhouse gas. (2016-12-06)

TU Wien develops new semiconductor processing technology
Extremely fine porous structures with tiny holes -- resembling a kind of sponge at nano level -- can be generated in semiconductors. This opens up new possibilities for the realization of tiny sensors or unusual optical and electronic components. There have already been experiments in this area with porous structures made from silicon. Now, researchers at TU Wien have succeeded in developing a method for the controlled manufacture of porous silicon carbide. (2018-01-22)

Paying attention to the neurons behind our alertness
The neurons of layer 6 - the deepest layer of the cortex - were examined by researchers from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University to uncover how they react to sensory stimulation in different behavioral states. (2020-08-20)

Ozone hole recovery may reshape southern hemisphere climate change
A full recovery of the stratospheric ozone hole could modify climate change in the southern hemisphere and even amplify Antarctic warming, according to scientists from the University of Colorado at Boulder, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and NASA. (2008-04-24)

Ozone watch
The symposium covers all issues related to atmospheric ozone, including trends of ozone in the stratosphere and troposphere, ozone-climate interactions, latest emerging techniques for ozone observations, and effects of ozone on human health, ecosystems and food production. Future challenges for stratospheric and tropospheric ozone are highlighted. (2017-02-01)

Scaling to new heights with gecko-inspired adhesive
Some animals, such as geckos, can easily climb up walls and across ceilings. But currently, no material exists that allows everyday people to scale walls or transverse ceilings as effortlessly. Now, scientists report in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces a dry adhesive that could someday make it easier to defy gravity. (2018-01-10)

Air pollution is associated with cancer mortality beyond lung cancer
A large scale epidemiological study associates some air pollutants with kidney, bladder and colorectal cancer death. (2017-10-31)

NOAA finds rising emissions of ozone-destroying chemical banned by Montreal Protocol
Emissions of one of the chemicals most responsible for the Antarctic ozone hole are on the rise, despite an international treaty that required an end to its production in 2010, a new NOAA study shows. (2018-05-16)

Few-layer Tellurium was predicted to be a promising successor of black phosphorus
Mono-elementary semiconductors have unique advantages in terms of their chemical simplicity. Exploring for a high-performance two-dimensional elementary semiconductor is paramount for future electronics. Recently, a team led by Profs. Wei Ji at Renmin University of China and Yang Chai at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University theoretically predicted few-layer α-Tellurium to be a promising elementary semiconductor with extremely high carrier mobility, layer-tunable bandgap, strong light absorption, large strength and good environmental stability. (2018-02-09)

Luxembourg researchers refute 20-year-old assumptions in solar cell production
Research led by the University of Luxembourg investigated the manufacturing process of solar cells. The researchers proved that assumptions on chemical processes that were commonplace among researchers and producers for the past 20 years are, in fact, inaccurate. The physicists published their findings in the renowned scientific journal Nature Communications. (2018-03-23)

Vertical measurements of air pollutants in urban Beijing
Scientists from CAS Institute of Atmospheric Physics use vertically resolved observation system based on the Beijing 325m Meteorological Tower to gain an in-depth understanding of the vertical evolution characteristics of air pollutants within urban boundary layer.They find that that the temperature inversion coupled by the interactions of different air masses elucidated the 'blue sky -- haze' co-existent phenomenon. (2018-03-02)

Microbes can grow on nitric oxide
Nitric oxide (NO) is a central molecule of the global nitrogen cycle. A study by Boran Kartal from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Germany, and colleagues reveals that microorganisms can grow on NO. Their results, which are now published in Nature Communications, change our view of the earth's nitrogen cycle and how microorganisms regulate the release of greenhouse gases from natural and man-made environments. (2019-03-18)

Printable solar cells just got a little closer
A University of Toronto Engineering innovation could make printing solar cells as easy and inexpensive as printing a newspaper. Dr. Hairen Tan and his team have cleared a critical manufacturing hurdle in the development of a relatively new class of solar devices called perovskite solar cells. This alternative solar technology could lead to low-cost, printable solar panels capable of turning nearly any surface into a power generator. (2017-02-16)

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