Popular Pain Management News and Current Events | Page 2

Popular Pain Management News and Current Events, Pain Management News Articles.
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Otago study first to report benefits and safety of FODMAP diet in children
The low FODMAP diet, a diet low in carbohydrates that trigger digestive symptoms like bloating and stomach pain, is a useful treatment in children and adolescents with gastrointestinal problems, new University of Otago research confirms. (2019-09-23)

Methadone may reduce need for opioids after surgery
Patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery who are treated with methadone during the procedure require significantly less intravenous and oral opioids to manage postoperative pain, reports a new study published in the May issue of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA). (2017-04-24)

Pain disruption therapy treats source of chronic back pain
People with treatment-resistant back pain may get significant and lasting relief with dorsal root ganglion (DRG) stimulation therapy, an innovative treatment that short-circuits pain, suggests a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2018 annual meeting. (2018-10-14)

New tool for prognosis and choice of therapy for rheumatoid arthritis
In rheumatoid arthritis, antibodies are formed that affect the inflammation in the joints. In an article published today in the journal Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, researchers at Uppsala University show that antibodies against the cartilage protein collagen II are associated with a good prognosis. (2017-03-23)

Warm showers and ball exercises may help women during childbirth
A new International Journal of Nursing Practice study demonstrates that during childbirth, women may benefit from warm showers, perineal exercises with a ball, or the combination of both strategies. (2018-03-07)

A new solution for chronic pain
Neuropathic pain is a chronic illness affecting 7-10 percent of the population in France and for which there is no effective treatment. Researchers at the Institute for Neurosciences of Montpellier (INSERM/Université de Montpellier) and the Laboratory for Therapeutic Innovation (CNRS/Université de Strasbourg) have uncovered the mechanism behind the appearance and continuation of pain. Based on their discovery, an innovative treatment was developed which produces, in animal subjects, an immediate, robust and long-lasting therapeutic effect on pain symptoms. (2018-03-12)

Program will train mental health providers, improve health care in rural Missouri
A new graduate education program at the University of Missouri has received nearly $700,000 from the Health Resources and Services Administration in the US Department of Health and Human Services to train psychology doctoral candidates in integrated, primary health care settings, in an effort to improve health care for underserved populations with mental health and physical disorders. (2016-08-09)

New pain treatment tested in humans
Nerve growth factor signals through receptors of the tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) family, and research in animals has shown that inhibitors of Trks A, B, and C can reduce pain. (2017-11-27)

Treating pain without feeding addiction: Study shows promise of non-drug pain management
A new study shows the potential for patients who have both addiction issues and chronic pain to get relief from an approach that combines behavioral therapy and social support to help them manage their pain without painkillers that carry an addiction risk. The low-cost approach, grounded in psychological theories of pain, could help address the nation's epidemic of addictions to opioid painkillers and illicit drugs. (2016-07-27)

Increased scientific rigor will improve wildlife research and management
Wildlife management relies on rigorous science that produces reliable knowledge because it increases accurate understanding of the natural world and informs management decisions. (2018-01-18)

Road pricing most effective in reducing vehicle emissions
For decades municipal and regional governments have used various traffic management strategies to reduce vehicle emissions, alongside advancements like cleaner fuel and greener cars. But not all traffic management strategies are created equal, says UBC transportation expert and civil engineering professor Alexander Bigazzi. After reviewing more than 60 studies on the subject, Bigazzi has concluded that road pricing -- or pay per use -- is the most effective strategy to reduce emissions and traffic. (2017-10-05)

Weight loss medicines underutilized by veterans
Despite the availability of new weight management medications and several clinical guidelines recommending their use as part of a comprehensive treatment plan for obesity, a new study has found that their use is extremely low (about one percent) among eligible Veterans. (2019-05-15)

New, persistent opioid use common after surgery
Among about 36,000 patients, approximately 6 percent continued to use opioids more than three months after their surgery, with rates not differing between major and minor surgical procedures, according to a study published by JAMA Surgery. (2017-04-12)

New study to investigate role of sleep in chronic pain
Washington State University will lead a study to understand the relationship between sleep and chronic pain, part of a nationwide effort to address the rising abuse of opioid pain relievers and expand the arsenal of non-drug treatment options. (2016-12-05)

Study shows race, not experience, impacts hiring in sports world
If you want to get your foot in the door of the sports industry, your race may mean more than your experience. That's the major result of a new study from North Carolina State University that examined hiring decisions for entry-level sports management positions. (2010-07-07)

Study: How to calculate pricing and resources for cloud computing
Researchers in the University at Buffalo School of Management have developed a new algorithm that cloud computing service providers can use to establish pricing and allocate resources. (2018-04-18)

Computed tomography provides anatomy -- we need ischemia!
CTA may facilitate management of symptomatic patients with low pre-test likelihood of CAD, in particular by conclusively showing absence of CAD. However, testing for inducible ischemia remains central for management decisions in both suspected and proven CAD and cannot be replaced by morphologic information. The use of CTA as a screening test for CAD in asymptomatic patients -- discouraged by current recommendations anyway -- should be abandoned. (2008-08-31)

CT angiography highly accurate, multicenter trials show
Computed tomography angiography is as accurate as an invasive angiogram in detecting coronary artery disease, according to findings from the first two prospective multicenter 64-slice scanner trials. (2007-11-26)

Artificial intelligence could prevent unneeded tests in patients with stable chest pain
Artificial intelligence (AI) could prevent unnecessary diagnostic tests in patients with stable chest pain, according to research presented today at ICNC 2019. A decision support system saved one hour of testing per patient. (2019-05-12)

Opioids produce analgesia via immune cells
Opioids are the most powerful painkillers. Researchers at the Charité -- Universitätsmedizin Berlin have now found that the analgesic effects of opioids are not exclusively mediated by opioid receptors in the brain, but can also be mediated via the activation of receptors in immune cells. Results from this research have been published in the journal Brain, Behavior, and Immunity. (2017-01-17)

Medical marijuana gets wary welcome from older adults, poll shows
Few older adults use medical marijuana, a new national poll finds, but the majority support its use if a doctor recommends it, and might talk to their own doctor about it if they developed a serious health condition. And two-thirds say the government should do more to study the drug's health effects. (2018-04-03)

Try togetherness: Study promotes cooperative weed management to curb herbicide resistance
In the fight against herbicide resistance, farmers are working with a shrinking toolkit. Waterhemp, a weedy nemesis of corn and soybean farmers, has developed resistance to multiple herbicide modes of action, often in the same plant. Even farmers using the latest recommendations for tank mixtures are fighting an uphill battle, with long-distance movement of pollen and seeds bringing the potential for new types of resistance into their fields each year. (2018-06-04)

Surgery for back pain reduces problems with sex life-related pain
For patients with degenerative spinal disease, surgery is more effective in reducing pain that interferes with sexual activity, compared to nonsurgical treatment, reports a study in the Nov. 15 issue of Spine, published by Wolters Kluwer. (2016-11-11)

Study findings question COX-2 drug cost effectiveness
Findings reported in a study published today by The American Journal of Managed Care call into question the cost effectiveness of the new, more expensive COX-2 anti-inflammatory drugs. Using data representing actual clinical practice, researchers sought to validate the rate of co-prescribing of agents used to protect the gastrointestinal tract -- a key assumption made in prior COX-2 cost-effectiveness studies. (2003-12-12)

Sugar pills relieve pain for chronic pain patients
Someday doctors may prescribe sugar pills for certain chronic pain patients based on their brain anatomy and psychology. And the pills will reduce their pain as effectively as any powerful drug on the market, according to new research. Scientists have shown they can reliably predict which chronic pain patients will respond to a sugar placebo pill based on the patients' brain anatomy and psychological characteristics. (2018-09-12)

Pain sensitization increases risk of persistent knee pain
Becoming more sensitive to pain, or pain sensitization, is an important risk factor for developing persistent knee pain in osteoarthritis (OA), according to a new study by researchers from the Université de Montréal (UdeM) School of Rehabilitation and Hôpital Maisonneuve Rosemont Research Centre (CRHMR) in collaboration with researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM). (2018-10-31)

Chronic pain common in people living with HIV
All people living with HIV should be screened for chronic pain, which affects 39 to 85 percent of people with the condition, recommend new HIVMA guidelines. Those who have chronic pain should be treated using a multidisciplinary approach focused on non-drug options ranging from yoga to physical therapy, note the guidelines. Opioids should never be a first-line treatment. (2017-09-14)

Bedside art therapy decreases pain and anxiety in patients with cancer
A brief bedside visual art intervention (BVAI) facilitated by art educators improved mood and reduced pain and anxiety in a study of inpatients with hematological cancers. (2018-04-19)

Multiple sclerosis drug could reduce painful side effects of common cancer treatment
Researchers from the Saint Louis University School of Medicine have discovered why many multiple myeloma patients experience severe pain when treated with the anticancer drug bortezomib. The study, which will be published April 27 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that a drug already approved to treat multiple sclerosis could mitigate this effect, allowing myeloma patients to successfully complete their treatment and relieving the pain of myeloma survivors. (2018-04-27)

Acupuncture possible treatment for dental anxiety
Researchers have found evidence that acupuncture could help people who experience dental anxiety. (2018-05-01)

Poor and less educated suffer the most from chronic pain
Poorer and less-educated older Americans are more like to suffer from chronic pain than those with greater wealth and more education, but the disparity between the two groups is much greater than previously thought, climbing as high as 370 percent in some categories, according to new research by a University at Buffalo medical sociologist. (2017-02-08)

Study shows pine bark naturally reduces knee osteoarthritis
According to the Center for Disease Control, osteoarthritis, the most common type of arthritis, is on the rise. A new study published in the August journal of Phytotherapy Research, reveals pycnogenol, bark extract from the French maritime pine tree, reduced overall knee osteoarthritis symptoms by 20.9 percent and lowered pain by 40.3 percent. (2008-09-03)

Quality of life predicts cancer survival, U-M study finds
Head and neck cancer patients who reported lower physical quality of life were more likely to die from their disease, according to a new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center. The findings could mean that identifying patients with poor quality of life could also identify patients with particularly aggressive tumors. (2008-05-29)

Can staying active help to prevent chronic pain? Physical activity affects pain modulation in older adults
Older adults with higher levels of physical activity have pain modulation patterns that might help lower their risk of developing chronic pain, reports a study in PAIN®, the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP). The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. (2017-02-24)

The anatomy of pain
Emotions consist of general components that are also elicited by similar impressions and specific components. (2016-03-23)

Opioid controlled substance agreements safely reduce health care visits, Mayo study finds
The medical community has long known that patients on long-term opioid therapy often have significantly more health care visits. But adhering to a standardized care process model for opioid prescriptions appears to reduce the overall number of health care visits for these patients while maintaining safety, shows new research published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2018-09-20)

The insular cortex processes pain and drives learning from pain
Neuroscientists at EPFL have discovered an area of the brain, the insular cortex, that processes painful experiences and thereby drives learning from aversive events. (2019-05-16)

Morris Animal Foundation study shows drug comes up short in osteoarthritis pain relief
Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers from the University of Georgia, have found that tramadol was ineffective in alleviating signs of pain associated with osteoarthritis in dogs. The research team published their results in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. (2018-05-02)

Studies provide new insights on mosquito-borne chikungunya virus infection
The frequency of chronic joint pain after infection with chikungunya in a large Latin-American cohort was 25 percent at a median of 20-months post-infection. (2017-12-20)

Does opioid use in pets create higher risk for abuse in humans?
The increase in opioid prescriptions for people over the past decade may have been paralleled by an increase in opioid prescriptions for pets, according to a study from researchers at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine and the School of Veterinary Medicine. The findings, in this first-ever study of veterinary opioid prescriptions, suggest it is possible that misused veterinary prescriptions could contribute to the ongoing opioid epidemic. (2019-01-11)

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