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Popular Pain Management News and Current Events, Pain Management News Articles.
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Studies provide new insights on mosquito-borne chikungunya virus infection
The frequency of chronic joint pain after infection with chikungunya in a large Latin-American cohort was 25 percent at a median of 20-months post-infection. (2017-12-20)

Electronic health records improve weekend surgery outcomes
Electronic health record systems significantly improve outcomes for patients who undergo surgeries on weekends, according to a Loyola Medicine study published in JAMA Surgery. Past research has shown that weekend surgery patients tend to experience longer hospital stays and higher mortality rates and readmissions, a phenomenon known as the 'weekend effect.' (2017-03-29)

Tai chi as good as or better than aerobic exercise for managing chronic pain
The ancient martial art of tai chi has similar or greater benefits than aerobic exercise for people with the chronic pain condition fibromyalgia, finds a trial published by The BMJ today. (2018-03-21)

Do US and Canadian governments base their hunt management plans on science?
The majority of hunt management policies in the US and Canada do not include science-based approaches in their composition, a new study finds. According to the authors, the results highlight the need for management agencies to more routinely adopt and adhere to science-based approaches, thus leading to better management of natural resources. (2018-03-07)

Is back pain killing us?
Older people who suffer from back pain have a 13 per cent increased risk of dying from any cause, University of Sydney research has found. Published in the European Journal of Pain, the study of 4390 Danish twins aged more than 70 years investigated whether spinal pain increased the rate of all-cause and disease-specific cardiovascular mortality. (2017-02-23)

Patient satisfaction with pain management linked to nurse staffing
Hospital patients' satisfaction with pain management is linked to nurse staffing, according to an article authored by nurse researchers from the Connell School of Nursing at Boston College and published in the journal Pain Management Nursing. (2017-09-06)

Peripheral nerve block provides some with long-lasting pain relief for severe facial pain
A new study has shown that use of peripheral nerve blocks in the treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia (TGN) may produce long-term pain relief. (2018-08-13)

Study shows that chronic grief activates pleasure areas of the brain
Most of us experience the grief associated with the loss of a loved one at some point in our lives. New research from UCLA now suggests that people who never get over their loss, who never (2008-06-20)

Pesticide management is failing Australian and Great Barrier Reef waterways
Scientists say a failure of Australian management means excessive amounts of harmful chemicals -- many now banned in countries such as the EU, USA and Canada -- are damaging the country's waterways and the Great Barrier Reef. (2019-11-07)

VA delivers higher quality care than other health providers, study finds
Examining a wide array of commonly used measures of health care quality, researchers have found that the VA health care system performs similar to or better than non-VA systems on most measures of inpatient and outpatient care quality. However, there is high variation in quality across individual VA facilities, suggesting that the VA needs targeted quality improvement efforts to ensure that veterans receive uniformly high-quality care. (2018-04-26)

Preventing and treating acute chest syndrome in children with sickle cell disease
Acute chest syndrome (ACS), a potentially severe lung complication of sickle cell disease, increases a child's risk of respiratory failure, chronic lung disease, and prolonged hospitalization if not recognized early and treated effectively. (2018-01-05)

When it comes to weight loss in overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis, more is better
Researchers previously showed that overweight and obese individuals with knee osteoarthritis can reduce pain by 50 percent and significantly improve function and mobility with a 10 percent or more weight loss over an 18-month period. (2018-06-18)

'Pain paradox' discovery provides route to new pain control drugs
A natural substance known to activate pain in the central nervous system has been found to have the opposite effect in other parts of the body, potentially paving the way to new methods of pain control. (2016-07-28)

Understanding pain exacerbation with Opioid use
A new study published in JNeurosci advances understanding of how the potent opioid analgesic fentanyl can increase pain sensitivity in animals. These findings could inform the development of treatments for chronic pain that minimize the side effects of these powerful pain-relieving drugs. (2018-02-05)

Health-related quality of life for patients with vascular malformations
Patients with vascular malformations, which include blood vessel, artery and lymph vessel abnormalities, appear to have more pain and mental health distress than the general US population and that can contribute to poor health-related quality of life. (2018-03-21)

Becoming more sensitive to pain increases the risk of knee pain not going away
A new study by researchers in Montreal and Boston looks at the role that pain plays in osteoarthritis, a disease that affects over 300 million adults worldwide. (2018-10-30)

Smoking, diabetes and high blood pressure increase women's risk of heart attack
Smoking, diabetes and high blood pressure increase the risk of a heart attack more in women than in men, new research from The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford has found. (2018-11-07)

New target for chronic pain relief confirmed by scientists
A research group at Hiroshima University observed a potential new target for chronic pain treatment. Further research using this receptor could lead to new, more effective drugs to use in pain-relieving treatment for chronic pain. (2019-03-07)

Neuropathic pain unmasks subliminal excitation in pain processing circuits
Research by Steven Prescott, at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children, sheds new light on the mechanism underlying the establishment of neuropathic pain. Experiments by Kwan Lee and Stéphanie Ratté in the Prescott lab show that dysregulation of chloride reduces inhibition across pain processing circuits, unmasking vast amounts of subliminal excitation in neurons that promote transmission of pain signals. These results were presented at the 10th Annual Canadian Neuroscience Meeting, on June 1, in Toronto. (2016-06-01)

Study: Patients only use about half of Opioids prescribed after hysterectomy
Doctors may be prescribing nearly twice the number of opioids than what the average patient needs after a hysterectomy, a new study suggests. (2017-12-04)

Menopause symptoms nearly double the risk of chronic pain
In addition to the other health conditions affected by estrogen, it has also been shown to affect pain sensitivity. This finding was the basis of a study of more than 200,000 records from the Veterans Health Administration that demonstrated a link between menopause symptoms and chronic pain. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2019-03-06)

The mouse brain can prioritize hunger by suppressing pain when survival is at stake
Different behaviors are often studied in isolation, leaving unanswered questions about how the brain processes needs and prioritizes behaviors to ensure survival. Now, researchers have shown that pain and hunger interact in complex ways in mice: extreme hunger suppresses less-urgent inflammatory pain, but leaves them able to feel and react to more life-and-death kinds of pain. The study, published March 22 in Cell, pinpoints a highly specific neural circuit that creates this analgesic effect. (2018-03-22)

Patients who receive prescription Opioids are more satisfied with care than other patients
Patients who receive prescription Opioids are more satisfied with care than other patients. (2018-01-09)

Does an exploding brain network cause chronic pain?
New research reports that hyperreactive brain networks could play a part in the hypersensitivity of fibromyalgia. (2018-01-12)

Randomized clinical trial examines therapies for chronic spinal pain
In a randomized clinical trial of patients with chronic spinal pain, a program that combined education to help patients think differently about pain with an exercise program that increasingly introduced movements patients feared or avoided (pain neuroscience education plus cognition-targeted motor control training) appeared better than usual care (combining education on back and neck pain and general exercise therapy) at reducing pain and improving function and thoughts of pain. (2018-04-16)

Methadone and systematic follow-up: the best solution for managing chronic pain
Approximately 30 percent of Canadians suffer daily from chronic pain. Patients may be affected differently depending on the intensity, but all chronic pain is debilitating and difficult to treat. A study carried out by Louise Lamb, a clinician nurse at the Pain Center of the Montreal University Health Center, and Dr. Yoram Shir, the director of the center, shows that methadone in combination with innovative and high-quality case management can provide relief for many patients. (2007-09-12)

Placebo and valium are equally effective for acute lower back pain in the ER
Emergency patients treated with naproxen and placebo had outcomes as good as or better than patients treated with naproxen and diazepam (trade name Valium) for acute lower back pain, according to the results of a double-blind, randomized clinical trial published last week in Annals of Emergency Medicine ('Diazepam Is No Better Than Placebo When Added to Naproxen for Acute Low Back Pain'). (2017-02-16)

Behavior not indicative of pain in stressed babies
In stressed newborn babies, behavior alone is not a reliable way of assessing pain, according to new UCL and UCLH research. The study, published today in Current Biology and funded by the Medical Research Council UK, found that hospitalized newborns, who are already stressed by their environment have a much larger pain response in their brain following a routine clinical skin lance than non-stressed babies. But this is not matched by an equivalent increase in their pain behavior. (2017-11-30)

Low-dose ketamine may be an effective alternative to opioids
Opioids are commonly prescribed in the emergency department (ED) for the treatment of acute pain, but due to the epidemic of opioid misuse, analgesic alternatives are being explored. A new Academic Emergency Medicine analysis of relevant studies found that low-dose ketamine is as effective as opioids for the control of acute pain in the ED. (2018-07-18)

A broken bone may lead to widespread body pain -- not just at the site of the fracture
Breaking a major bone may increase risk of widespread chronic body pain in later life, a new study has found. (2016-01-05)

Beyond drugs for IBD: Improving the overall health of IBD patients
1.6 million Americans suffer from IBD. Identifying the best medical treatment leads to improved disease management, but IBD patients also experience mental, emotional and other physical side effects that need to be understood and managed to improve the overall health of IBD patients. Research presented at the Crohn's & Colitis Congress™ helps health care providers understand how to better manage their patients' overall health and mental well-being to increase the quality of their lives. (2018-01-19)

New evidence that hip and knee steroid injections more dangerous than thought
A new study reveals that commonly given hip and knee steroid intra-articular injections may be harmful in some patients with at-risk conditions or may cause complications that are not well understood. (2019-10-15)

Regular cannabis users require up to 220% higher dosage for sedation in medical procedures
Researchers in Colorado examined medical records of 250 patients who received endoscopic procedures after 2012, when the state legalized recreational cannabis. They found patients who smoked or ingested cannabis on a daily or weekly basis required 14% more fentanyl, 20% more midazolam, and 220% more propofol to achieve optimum sedation for routine procedures, including colonoscopy. (2019-04-15)

Constipation most common cause of children's abdominal pain
Acute and chronic constipation together accounted for nearly half of all cases of acute abdominal pain in children treated at one hospital. The study also suggests that physicians should do a simple rectal examination for constipation when trying to determine the cause of abdominal pain in children. (2007-12-17)

New study shows invasive Chinese privet can be well controlled with lower concentrations of herbicide
Chinese privet is one of the most invasive shrubs in the southeastern United States -- frequently growing in dense thickets along roadsides, on rights of way and in forests. Now the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management has good news for land managers battling the shrub. Researchers say you can achieve great control with much less herbicide than typically used. (2018-04-10)

Which pain medication is safest for arthritis patients?
In a recent Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics study, arthritis patients taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for pain plus a stomach acid-reducing medicine called esomeprazole had infrequent gastrointestinal side effects. (2018-04-19)

Mayo researchers: complementary therapies help patients recover after heart surgery
A new Mayo Clinic study shows that massage therapy decreases pain levels for patients after heart surgery. (2007-10-31)

Study identifies effective parenting strategies to reduce disruptive behavior in children
Most parenting programs aim to teach parents how to reduce their children's disruptive behavior. New research looked at more than 150 studies of these programs, finding differences in what works best according to whether or not children already showed behavior problems. (2018-03-20)

Induced labor after 39 weeks in healthy women may reduce the need for cesarean birth
In a study presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's (SMFM) annual meeting, researchers unveiled findings that suggest that induction of labor at 39 weeks of gestation among healthy, first-time mothers reduces the rate of cesarean birth as compared to expectant management among the same population. (2018-02-01)

New RA guideline emphasizes maximizing methotrexate and biologics, minimizing steroids
The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) will preview its 2020 Guideline for the Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) at ACR Convergence, the ACR's annual meeting. (2020-11-06)

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