Popular Pain Management News and Current Events | Page 4

Popular Pain Management News and Current Events, Pain Management News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 4 of 25 | 1000 Results
New RA guideline emphasizes maximizing methotrexate and biologics, minimizing steroids
The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) will preview its 2020 Guideline for the Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) at ACR Convergence, the ACR's annual meeting. (2020-11-06)

Spinal manipulation treatment for low back pain associated with modest improvement in pain, function
Among patients with acute low back pain, spinal manipulation therapy was associated with modest improvements in pain and function at up to six weeks, with temporary minor musculoskeletal harms, according to a study published by JAMA. (2017-04-11)

Induced labor after 39 weeks in healthy women may reduce the need for cesarean birth
In a study presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's (SMFM) annual meeting, researchers unveiled findings that suggest that induction of labor at 39 weeks of gestation among healthy, first-time mothers reduces the rate of cesarean birth as compared to expectant management among the same population. (2018-02-01)

Roles and functions of community health workers in primary care
Community health workers in primary care provide clinical services, community resource connections, and health education and coaching. As trained individuals with limited or no formal medical education, they are widely considered to have the potential to enhance primary care access and quality, but remain underutilized. (2018-05-14)

It's not just a pain in the head -- facial pain can be a symptom of headaches too
A new study finds that up to 10% of people with headaches also have facial pain. The study is published in the Aug. 21, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2019-08-21)

Minimally invasive treatment reduces knee pain and disability from osteoarthritis
A nonsurgical treatment could improve quality of life for patients with knee pain due to osteoarthritis, according to new research presented today at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2018 Annual Scientific Meeting. (2018-03-19)

Standing up for weight management
A new study from the University of Pittsburgh's School of Education examined the potential weight management benefits of sit-stand desks. Pitt's researchers found that regular use of a height-adjustable workstation, when combined with other low-intensity activities, is an effective measure for maintaining weight for most people. (2016-08-29)

Researchers uncover link between immune function and osteoarthritic pain and progression
The study, published in the medical journal Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, found that monocytes, the white blood cells necessary to regulate immune responses, were more activated and pro-inflammatory in women with osteoarthritis, and that elevated inflammation and body mass index were associated with this increased activation. (2017-11-27)

Chronic opioid therapy can disrupt sleep, increase risk of sleep disorders
Patients and medical providers should be aware that chronic opioid use can interfere with sleep by reducing sleep efficiency and increasing the risk of sleep-disordered breathing, according to a position statement from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. (2019-11-19)

Ultrasound-triggered liposomes for on-demand, local anesthesia
Researchers at Boston Children's Hospital have found a new way to non-invasively relieve pain at local sites in the body; such systems could one day improve pain management by replacing addictive opioids and short-lasting local anesthetics. (2017-08-10)

Early access to palliative care associated with better quality of life
Patients with advanced cancer have a significantly better quality of life in the weeks before they die if they receive early access to palliative care, according to research published today. (2018-01-31)

Study finds common surgeries may serve as pathway to nonmedical opioid use in adolescents
Results of study, the first known to suggest long-term opioid use after surgery may be a significant problem for teens and young adults, shows youth patients commonly fill post-surgical painkiller prescriptions for months beyond typical recovery times. (2017-09-15)

Leuven researchers uncover ion channel trio that mediates painful heat sensing
Researchers at VIB and KU Leuven have uncovered a trio of complementary ion channels in sensory neurons that mediate detection of acute, harmful heat. Having three redundant molecular heat-sensing mechanisms provides a powerful fail-safe mechanism that protects against burn injuries. The seminal findings have been published today in Nature. (2018-03-14)

Neuroinflammation seen in spinal cord, nerve roots of patients with chronic sciatica
A study by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has found, for the first time in humans, that patients with chronic sciatica -- back pain that shoots down the leg -- have evidence of inflammation in key areas of the nervous system. (2018-05-09)

Medicinal marijuana effective for neuropathic pain in HIV
In a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial to assess the impact of smoked medical cannabis, or marijuana, on the neuropathic pain associated with HIV, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine found that reported pain relief was greater with cannabis than with a placebo. (2008-08-06)

Study suggests failed osteoarthritis drug could help treat opioid addiction
A study from Indiana University suggests that a drug proven safe for use in people may prevent opioid tolerance and physical dependence when used with opioid-based pain medications. (2018-02-27)

Penn's 'enhanced recovery' protocol reduces opioid use in spinal surgery patients
A novel 'Enhanced Recovery After Surgery' (ERAS) protocol developed by Penn Medicine for patients undergoing spinal and peripheral nerve surgery significantly reduced opioid use. The new study published in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine showed that when an ERAS protocol was employed, fewer patients needed pain medications one month after surgery. (2019-01-25)

Most reproductive-age women using opioids also use another substance
The majority of reproductive-age and pregnant women who use opioids for non-medical purposes also use at least one other substance, ranging from nicotine or alcohol to cocaine, according to a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health analysis. It was the first to look at use of multiple substances in a nationally representative group of US women age 18 to 44. (2017-06-30)

Duration of treatment rather than dose more strongly associated with opioid misuse after surgery
Prescribing higher opioid doses for shorter durations may be a more effective way to treat pain after surgery, while minimizing the risk of longer term misuse and addiction, suggest US researchers in The BMJ today. (2018-01-17)

Pilot study in Kenya shows link between chronic pain and glutamate consumption
Preliminary research from a small pilot study carried out in Meru, in eastern Kenya, shows a link between chronic pain and consumption of glutamate, a common flavor enhancer found in Western and non-Western diets worldwide. (2018-02-16)

Clinical trial supports chiropractic care as component of care for low back pain
US military personnel with low back pain who received usual medical care plus chiropractic care reported moderate improvement in their pain intensity and disability compared with patients who received usual medical care alone. (2018-05-18)

Studies provide new insights into the role of sleep in chronic pain
The results of two studies presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) provide insight into the role of sleep in chronic pain. The first study demonstrates a predictive role of sleep problems for chronic pain and the second provides insight into chronic pain and sleep in adolescents. (2018-06-15)

Many wildlife-vehicle collisions preventable
A new study from the University of Waterloo has found that Ontario could save millions by implementing simple measures to help prevent vehicle accidents involving wildlife. (2018-06-21)

Is resveratrol an effective add-on to NSAIDS to treat knee osteoarthritis?
In what researchers state is the first pilot clinical trial to assess the effects of resveratrol on pain severity and levels of inflammatory biomarkers in patients with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis, the scientists compared treatment with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) combined with either resveratrol or placebo over 90 days. (2018-09-17)

Weight loss reverses heart condition in obesity sufferers
Australian research shows for the first time that obese people who are suffering from atrial fibrillation can reduce or reverse the effects of the condition by losing weight. (2018-06-20)

Undiagnosed spine fractures often cause pain in older men
Fewer than a quarter of new vertebral fractures are clinically diagnosed, yet they often cause symptoms. In a study of older men in the general population now published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, clinically undiagnosed vertebral fractures that were evident on X-rays were associated with higher likelihood of back pain and limited physical activity. (2017-09-07)

Neuroscientists find 'gatekeeper' in itching sensations plays no role in pain transmission
A neurotransmitter study in mice found that BNP is involved in relaying itching sensations but not pain. A better understanding of pain and itch pathways could help researchers develop targeted therapies for diseases with chronic itching, including multiple sclerosis and kidney failure. (2017-10-03)

Length of opioid prescription spell highest risk for misuse after surgery
With opioid overdoses now a leading cause of nonintentional death in the United States, data show most of these deaths can be traced back to an initial prescription opioid. A new study led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Harvard Medical School (HMS) sheds light on the possible link between physicians' opioid prescription patterns and subsequent abuse. (2018-01-19)

Cancer patients' pain eased by simple bedside chart, study shows
Patients with cancer could benefit from a simple bedside system to manage their pain, a study suggests. (2018-03-26)

To treat pain, you need to treat the patient
People in chronic pain are some of the most difficult patients to treat. Clinicians and researchers at UW Medicine's Center for Pain Relief found that an in-depth questionnaire can help immensely. Their work to create a pain assessment adaptable to any primary care clinic was recently published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. (2018-05-04)

New approach for treating neuropathic pain
Neuropathic pain is the chronic, pathological pain that continues even when the cause of pain is removed. Causes include damage to nerve cells and medicines used to treat cancer. A collaboration between research groups from Indiana University in Bloomington, USA and Turku Centre for Biotechnology in Finland has discovered a novel therapeutic that appears to interrupt the signaling cascades in the body required for multiple forms of neuropathic pain. (2018-05-04)

Emergency departments administering more medications through the nose
Administering medications through the nose as an alternative to injections or IVs is becoming increasingly popular in emergency departments and ambulances, according to a paper by Loyola Medicine pharmacists. The intranasal route 'is easy, fast and noninvasive,' emergency department pharmacist Megan A. Rech, Pharm.D., M.S., and colleagues write in the journal Annals of Emergency Medicine. (2017-04-18)

Primary care practices use 4 complementary methods to identify high-risk patients
Risk stratified care management -- assigning a patient to a risk category on which care is based -- is increasingly viewed as a way to improve care and reduce costs. This research appears in the September/October 2017 Annals of Family Medicine. (2017-09-12)

I feel you: Emotional mirror neurons found in the rat
Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience have found that the rat brain activates the same cells when they observe the pain of others as when they experience pain themselves. In addition, without activity of these 'mirror neurons,' the animals no longer share the pain of others. Finding the neural basis for sharing the emotions of others is an exciting step towards understanding empathy. (2019-04-11)

Acupressure for menstrual pain
Can acupressure achieve a sustained reduction in menstrual pain? Is an app-based self-care program particularly attractive to young women? These questions addressed in a new study by researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, the results of which have been published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology*. (2018-04-04)

Few patients maximize opioid-sparing medications after orthopaedic surgery, study finds
A new study led by Johns Hopkins researchers adds to growing evidence that patients underuse nonopioid pain relievers to supplement opioid pain management after spine and joint surgery. (2018-04-30)

Pain researchers get a common language to describe pain
Pain researchers around the world have agreed to classify pain in the mouth, jaw and face according to the same system. According to a participant from Aarhus University in Denmark, this means more precise diagnoses and improved treatment of people suffering from pain. (2020-03-10)

Study finds diversity boosts innovation in US companies
A recent study finds that taking steps to foster diversity makes a company more innovative, in terms of product innovations, patents created and citations on patents -- meaning the relevant innovations are also used to develop new technologies. (2018-01-09)

New guideline warns pain benefits of medical cannabis overstated
A new medical guideline suggests Canada's family physicians should take a sober second thought before prescribing medical cannabis to most patients. Published in Canadian Family Physician, (2018-02-15)

Pain in the neck
Researchers led by University of Utah bioengineering assistant professor Robby Bowles have discovered a way to curb chronic pain by modulating genes that reduce tissue- and cell-damaging inflammation. (2017-03-13)

Page 4 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.