Popular Paint News and Current Events

Popular Paint News and Current Events, Paint News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 14 | 544 Results
Fifty years after the Cuyahoga conflagration
On June 22, 1969, the Cuyahoga River, which flows through Cleveland, Ohio, caught fire. Although firefighters extinguished the blaze within 30 minutes, the shocking event helped galvanize the US environmental movement. Fifty years later, the river is much healthier but still recuperating from a legacy of pollution, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. (2019-06-19)

Study examines blood lead levels of Flint children before and after water crisis
Flint children's blood lead levels were nearly three times higher almost a decade before the year of the Flint water crisis, new research shows. (2018-03-26)

Ancient lake reveals a colorful past
Archaeologists say they may have discovered one of the earliest examples of a 'crayon' -- possibly used by our ancestors 10,000 years ago for applying color to their animal skins or for artwork. (2018-01-26)

New study shows electronic health records often capture incomplete mental health data
This study compares information available in a typical electronic health record (EHR) with data from insurance claims, focusing on diagnoses, visits, and hospital care for depression and bipolar disorder. (2016-04-21)

Study: Climate change reshaping how heat moves around globe
The Earth's atmosphere and oceans play important roles in moving heat from one part of the world to another, and new research is illuminating how those patterns are changing in the face of climate change. (2019-01-28)

Completing the drug design jigsaw
A powerful new way of analysing how drugs interact with molecules in the body could aid the design of better treatments with fewer side-effects. (2017-10-05)

Thermal blankets melt snow quickly
Removing snow piled high in parking lots and along roadsides could soon be a far less tedious task. In a study appearing in ACS' journal Langmuir, scientists report that they have tested sunlight-absorbing thermal blankets capable of melting snow three times faster than it would on its own. They say the blankets could slash snow-removal costs and reduce the risk of environmental contamination caused by soot and other products used to melt the white stuff. (2018-02-14)

Tactile sensor gives robots new capabilities
Eight years ago, Ted Adelson's research group at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) unveiled a new sensor technology, called GelSight, that uses physical contact with an object to provide a remarkably detailed 3-D map of its surface. Now, by mounting GelSight sensors on the grippers of robotic arms, two MIT teams have given robots greater sensitivity and dexterity. (2017-06-05)

First-of-its-kind mummy study reveals clues to girl's story
Who is she, this little mummy girl? Northwestern University scientists and students are working to unravel some of her mysteries, including how her body was prepared 1,900 years ago in Egypt, what items she may have been buried with and what material is in her brain cavity. As part of a comprehensive investigation, the mummy traveled from Evanston to Argonne National Laboratory on Nov. 27 for an X-ray scattering experiment -- the first study of its kind performed on a human mummy. (2017-11-29)

Drinking glasses can contain potentially harmful levels of lead and cadmium
Enamelled drinking glasses and popular merchandise can contain more than 1000 times the limit level of lead and up to 100 times the limit level of cadmium, a study by the University of Plymouth has shown. (2017-11-05)

New method to map miniature brain circuits
In a feat of nanoengineering, scientists have developed a new technique to map electrical circuits in the brain far more comprehensively than ever before. Scientists worldwide could use the technique to uncover the architecture of different parts of the brain. (2018-01-12)

Scientists from UCLA, National Gallery of Art pioneer new way to analyze ancient artwork
Scientists from UCLA and the National Gallery of Art have used a combination of three advanced imaging techniques to produce a highly detailed analysis of a second century Egyptian painting. They are the first to use the specific combination -- which they termed (2017-12-11)

University of Utah biologists experimentally trigger adaptive radiation
Using host-specific parasites isolated on individual pigeon 'islands,' the scientists showed that descendants of a single population of feather lice adapted rapidly in response to preening. They found that preening drives rapid and divergent camouflage in feather lice transferred to different colored rock pigeons. Over four years and 60 generations, the lice evolved heritable color differences that spanned the full color range of the lice genus found on 300 bird species worldwide. (2019-03-05)

Improved NIST SRM aids lead poisoning detection
Lead in goat blood might not be on the top of your shopping list, but for US medical personnel who each year perform more than 2 million human blood measurements, Standard Reference Material 955c from NIST can't be beat. (2007-08-03)

Using urban pigeons to monitor lead pollution
Tom Lehrer sang about poisoning them, but those pigeons in the park might be a good way to detect lead and other toxic compounds in cities. A new study of pigeons in New York City shows that levels of lead in the birds track with neighborhoods where children show high levels of lead exposure. (2016-07-19)

A peek at living room decor suggests how decorations vary around the world
People around the world paint their walls different colors, buy plants to spruce up their interiors and engage in a variety of other beautifying techniques to personalize their homes, which inspired a team of researchers to study about 50,000 living rooms across the globe. (2019-02-22)

Scientists edit butterfly wing spots and stripes
An international research team working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama knocked-out a single control gene in the DNA of seven different butterfly species. In the Sept. 18 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences early online edition, they reveal the surprising results of rewiring the WntA gene: a single gene influences the exuberant diversity of butterfly wing patterns in nature. (2017-09-18)

Interdisciplinary approaches to wildlife trade management
The BioScience Talks podcast features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences. (2017-10-12)

Hidden talents: Converting heat into electricity with pencil and paper
Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest of components: a normal pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint are sufficient to convert a temperature difference into electricity via the thermoelectric effect. This has now been demonstrated by a team at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin. (2018-02-16)

Better, stronger: Polymer breakthrough to improve things we use everyday
Medicine, mobile phones, computers and clothes could all be enhanced using the process for making paint, according to research by the University of Warwick. (2016-10-18)

Imaging technique unlocks the secrets of 17th century artists
The secrets of 17th century artists can now be revealed, thanks to 21st century signal processing. Using modern high-speed scanners and the advanced signal processing techniques, researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology are peering through layers of pigment to see how painters prepared their canvasses, applied undercoats, and built up layer upon layer of paint to produce their masterpieces. (2017-11-21)

Solar paint offers endless energy from water vapor
Researchers in Melbourne, Australia, have developed a compound that draws moisture from the air and splits it into oxygen and hydrogen. The hydrogen can be captured as a clean fuel source. (2017-06-14)

New public tool uses Twitter posts to gain insights about marijuana use
Journalists, researchers, policymakers, and the public looking to gain new insights about the use of marijuana can now turn to CannabisConvo. (2017-01-26)

How our ancestors with autistic traits led a revolution in Ice Age art
Around 30,000 years ago realistic art suddenly flourished in Europe. Extremely accurate depictions of bears, bison, horses and lions decorate the walls of Ice Age archaeological sites such as Chauvet Cave in southern France. The authors of a new study argue that individuals with (2018-05-14)

Visualizing single molecules in whole cells with a new spin
In their new study, a Wyss Institute/Max Planck Institute team adapted DNA-PAINT technology to microscopes that are widespread among cell biology laboratories, called confocal microscopes, and that are used by researchers to image whole cells and thicker tissues at lower resolution. The MPI/Wyss Institute team demonstrates that the method can visualize a variety of different molecules, including combinations of different proteins, RNAs and DNA throughout the entire depth of whole cells at super-resolution. (2017-12-12)

Possible link found between diabetes and common white pigment
In a pilot study by a team of researchers at The University of Texas at Austin, crystalline particles of titanium dioxide -- the most common white pigment in everyday products ranging from paint to candies -- were found in pancreas specimens with Type 2 diabetes, suggesting that exposure to the white pigment is associated with the disease. (2018-06-20)

Restoration based on chemistry
Considered the pinnacle of mediaeval painting, the Ghent Altarpiece was painted around 1432 by Jan van Eyck and probably his brother Hubert. It is currently undergoing the most extensive conservation treatment for more than a century. The decision to remove all overpaint was underpinned by scientific arguments: Belgian researchers report in the journal Angewandte Chemie about their use of 'chemical maps' to visualize the original paint layers under the overpainted surface. (2017-04-03)

Paint job transforms walls into sensors, interactive surfaces
Walls are what they are -- big, dull dividers. With a few applications of conductive paint and some electronics, however, walls can become smart infrastructure that sense human touch, and detect things like gestures and when appliances are used. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and Disney Research found that they could transform dumb walls into smart walls at relatively low cost using simple tools and techniques, such as a paint roller. (2018-04-23)

Exposure to paint, varnish, other solvents linked to increased risk of MS
People who have been exposed to paint, varnish and other solvents and who also carry genes that make them more susceptible to developing multiple sclerosis (MS) may be at much greater risk of developing the disease than people who have only the exposure to solvents or the MS genes, according to a study published in the July 3, 2018, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2018-07-03)

Pitt research shows early lead exposure is a significant cause of juvenile delinquency
Children exposed to lead have significantly greater odds of developing delinquent behavior, according to a University of Pittsburgh researcher. The study results, directed by Herbert Needleman, M.D., professor of child psychiatry and pediatrics, were presented today at the 2000 Pediatric Academic Societies and American Academy of Pediatrics Joint Meeting. (2000-05-14)

Severe lead poisoning in children: Causes and risk factors
Although national and local policies have reduced the prevalence of lead poisoning in the United States, severe cases still occur. Whereas, exposures at blood lead levels (BLLs) as low as 5 μg/dL have been associated with long-term irreversible cognitive deficits, more severe exposures at BLLs ?45 μg/dL can result in organ damage and death. In a new study scheduled for publication in The Journal of Pediatrics, researchers identified sources of exposure and assessed outcomes for children with severe lead poisoning. (2016-10-19)

A more accurate sensor for lead paint
A new molecular gel recipe developed at the University of Michigan is at the core of a prototype for a more accurate lead paint test. (2016-09-08)

Diagnosing 'art acne' in Georgia O'Keeffe's paintings
A multidisciplinary team from Northwestern University and the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe, New Mexico has diagnosed the strange paint disease causing Georgia O'Keeffe's paintings to deteriorate. The micron-sized protrusions are metal soaps, resulting from a chemical reaction between the metal ions and fatty acids commonly used as binder in paints. (2019-02-16)

Reversible saliva allows frogs to hang on to next meal
A Georgia Tech study says a frog tongue's stickiness is caused by a reversible saliva in combination with a super soft tongue. A frog's saliva is thick and sticky during prey capture, then turns thin and watery as prey is removed inside the mouth. (2017-01-31)

Imported candy at top of contaminated food list in California
Following a state law mandating testing, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) issued more alerts for lead in candy than for the other top three sources of food-borne contamination combined, according to the first analysis of outcomes of the 2006 law by researchers at UC San Francisco and CDPH. (2017-10-26)

During disasters, active Twitter users likely to spread falsehoods
During disasters, active Twitter users are likely to spread falsehoods. That's according to new research that examined false tweets from Hurricane Sandy and the Boston Marathon bombing. Researchers found that 86 to 91 percent of active Twitter users spread misinformation, and that nearly as many did nothing to correct it. (2018-05-11)

What jigsaw puzzles tell us about child development
New research shows that children only learn to do jigsaw puzzles once they have reached a certain stage of development. Three-year-olds use trial and error, but four-year-olds are able to use information in the picture to complete the puzzles. The research team say this understanding is the foundation of learning to draw and paint. (2020-07-28)

Research on spider glue resolves sticky problem
Ever wonder why paint peels off the wall during summer's high humidity? Interfacial water, as it's known, forms a slippery and non-adhesive layer between the glue and the surface to which it is meant to stick, interfering with the formation of adhesive bonds between the two. The ability of the spider glue to overcome this problem is the key finding of research at University of Akron, one with perhaps the strongest prospect for commercial development. (2018-06-05)

Next generation of watch springs
What happens when something keeps getting smaller and smaller? This is the type of question Empa researcher Johann Michler and his team are investigating. As a by-product of their research completely novel watch springs could soon be used in Swiss timepieces. (2018-10-30)

Biophysics -- lighting up DNA-based nanostructures
Biophysicists from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have used a new variant of super-resolution microscopy to visualize all the strands of a DNA-based nanostructure for the first time. The method promises to optimize the design of such structures for specific applications. (2018-04-24)

Page 1 of 14 | 544 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.