Popular Password News and Current Events

Popular Password News and Current Events, Password News Articles.
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For some US counties, climate change will be particularly costly
A highly granular assessment of the impacts of climate change on the US economy suggests that each 1°Celsius increase in temperature will cost 1.2 percent of the country's gross domestic product, on average. (2017-06-29)

Storing data in music
Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a technique for embedding data in music and transmitting it to a smartphone. Since the data is imperceptible to the human ear, it doesn't affect listening pleasure. This could have interesting applications in hotels, museums and department stores. (2019-07-09)

Off-the-shelf smart devices found easy to hack
'It only took 30 minutes to find passwords for most of the devices and some of them were found only through a Google search of the brand,' says Omer Shwartz, a Ph.D. student and member of Dr. Oren's lab. 'Once hackers can access an IoT device, like a camera, they can create an entire network of these camera models controlled remotely.' (2018-03-13)

Researchers found a security flaw that had 10 million banking app users at risk
Researchers from the University of Birmingham have developed a tool to perform semi-automated security testing of mobile phone apps. After running the tool on a sample of 400 security critical apps, they were able to identify a critical vulnerability in banking apps; including apps from HSBC, NatWest, Co-op and Bank of America Health. (2017-12-06)

You too can learn to farm on Mars!
Scientists at Washington State University and the University of Idaho are helping students figure out how to farm on Mars, much like astronaut Mark Watney, played by Matt Damon, attempts in the critically acclaimed movie 'The Martian.' (2015-10-20)

Heartbeat could be used as password to access electronic health records
Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have devised a new way to protect personal electronic health records using a patient's own heartbeat. (2017-01-18)

Scientists discover how obesity stops 'guardian immune cells' from doing their job
Special immune cells -- ILCs -- cannot function properly once obesity is established. Without their help, we are at risk from inflammation and diabetes. Scientists now have new therapeutic targets to prevent and control obesity-related inflammation and metabolic disease. (2017-03-02)

Improve your information security by giving employees more options
A recent study published in the Journal of Management Information Systems suggests information security managers and supervisors could have greater success in motivating employees to act more securely by avoiding cold, authoritative commands, and instead create security messages that are relatable and provide options for how employees can better protect information and respond to threats. (2018-03-26)

Monarch butterflies disappearing from western North America
Monarch butterfly populations from western North America have declined far more dramatically than was previously known and face a greater risk of extinction than eastern monarchs, according to a new study in the journal Biological Conservation. (2017-09-07)

Mayo Clinic spearheads research to discover unsuspected gene for atrial fibrillation
Mayo Clinic researchers have found a gene mutation linked to one family's hereditary form of atrial fibrillation. (2008-07-09)

Index that tracks impact of pharmaceuticals worldwide to relaunch, focus on more diseases
The Global Health Impact Index, developed by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York to rank pharmaceutical companies based on their drugs' impact on global health, is launching a new, more-robust model that addresses even more diseases worldwide. (2019-05-06)

App uses smartphone compass to stop voice hacking
A University at Buffalo-led team of engineers is creating an app to stop voice hacking. The app uses existing smartphone components, including the magnetometer for the phone's compass, to detect when someone's voice is being broadcast on a speaker. (2017-06-05)

Researchers identify how phishing strategies may lead to success or failure
To begin to understand the psychology of criminals' behaviors in cybersecurity and how it can be used to prevent phishing attacks, Carnegie Mellon University's Prashanth Rajivan and Cleotilde Gonzalez identified how adversaries may be more successful when they exploit specific phishing strategies than when they use other less successful ones. (2018-02-26)

New attacks on graphics processors endanger user privacy
Web browsers use GPUs to render graphics on desktops, laptops, and smart phones. GPUs are also used to accelerate applications on the cloud and data centers. GPUs are usually programmed using application programming interfaces, or APIs, such as OpenGL. OpenGL is accessible by any application on a desktop with user-level privileges. Since desktop or laptop machines by default come with the graphics libraries and drivers installed, the attack can be implemented easily using graphics APIs. (2018-11-05)

Mayo Clinic study finds risk of sudden cardiac death highest early after attack
People who survive a heart attack face the greatest risk of dying from sudden cardiac death during the first month after leaving the hospital, according to a long-term community study by Mayo Clinic researchers of nearly 3,000 heart attack survivors. (2008-11-04)

Do you know why and how you forget passwords?
Do you frequently forget passwords to a baffling array of accounts and websites? Much depends on a password's importance and how often you use it, according to a Rutgers University-New Brunswick-led study that could spur improved password technology and use. (2018-09-06)

So you think you can secure your mobile phone with a fingerprint?
No two people are believed to have identical fingerprints, but researchers have found that partial similarities between prints are common enough that the fingerprint-based security systems used in electronic devices can be more vulnerable than previously thought. The vulnerability lies in the fact that fingerprint-based authentication systems feature small sensors that store partial fingerprints. The researchers found there could be enough similarities among different people's partial prints that one could create a 'MasterPrint.' (2017-04-11)

Riding the (quantum magnetic) wave
Working together, Miller, Boehme, Vardeny and their colleagues have shown that an organic-based magnet can carry waves of quantum mechanical magnetization, called magnons, and convert those waves to electrical signals. It's a breakthrough for the field of magnonics (electronic systems that use magnons instead of electrons) because magnons had previously been sent through inorganic materials that are more difficult to handle. (2018-03-12)

Agent 007: Organic Molecules as bearers of secrets
In the digital age, security of sensitive information is of utmost importance. Many data are encrypted these methods use a password for decryption, and in most cases, exactly this password is the entrance gate for hackers. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) use a new and highly secure approach by combining computer science with chemistry and a conventional encryption method with a chemical password. (Nature Communications, DOI: 10.1038/s41467-018-03784-x External Link). (2018-04-25)

Password managers vulnerable to insider hacking
A new study shows that communication channels between different parts and pieces of computer software are prone to security breaches. Anyone with access to a shared computer -- co-workers, family members, or guests -- can attack or involuntarily subject it to security breaches. (2018-08-15)

Authentication of patients in medicine via online system should be discussed ethically
A group of researchers led by Osaka University indicated that the authentication system for medical research/treatment using ICT needs consideration to ethical issues including 1) respect for autonomy, 2) privacy protection and 3) relationship of trust.. With that in mind, they proposed two-factor authentication: (1) login authentication using a user ID and password and (2) authentication using a one-off password. (2018-06-25)

Columbia astronomers find first compelling evidence for a moon outside our solar system
On the hunt for distant worlds, Columbia researchers have identified an exomoon candidate around the transiting exoplanet Kepler-1625b that indicates the presence of a previously unknown gas-giant moon. (2018-10-03)

A majority of medical professionals improperly share log-in credentials to EMRs
Nearly three-quarters (73 percent) of the 299 participants claimed to have used another medical staff member's password to access an EMR at work. More than 57 percent of participants (171 out of 299) estimated they have used someone else's password an average of 4.75 times. (2017-09-26)

Computer scientists develop a simple tool to tell if websites suffered a data breach
Computer scientists have built and successfully tested a tool designed to detect when websites are hacked by monitoring the activity of email accounts associated with them. The researchers were surprised to find that almost 1 percent of the websites they tested had suffered a data breach during their 18-month study period, regardless of how big the companies' reach and audience are. (2017-12-12)

Quantum physicists succeed in controlling energy losses and shifts
In their paper to be published on March 11, 2019 in Nature Physics, scientists from Aalto University and the University of Oulu demonstrate that they can increase the dissipation rate, on demand, by a factor of thousand in a high-quality superconducting resonator--just like the ones used in prototype quantum computers. (2019-03-11)

Autonomous vehicles and moral decisions: What do online communities think?
In 2016, researchers at CNRS, MIT, Harvard University and the University of British Columbia launched the 'Moral Machine' online platform to ask users about moral dilemmas facing us in the development of autonomous vehicles. The researchers gathered 40 million decisions from millions of web users worldwide. The results show global moral preferences that may guide decision makers and companies in the future. The analysis of this data was published in Nature on October 24, 2018. (2018-10-24)

Combination of features produces new Android vulnerability
A new vulnerability affecting Android mobile devices results not from a traditional bug, but from the malicious combination of two legitimate permissions that power desirable and commonly used features in popular apps. (2017-05-21)

Basic password guidance can dramatically improve account security, study shows
Technology users who receive guidance when setting passwords -- including how likely it is that hackers could break into their accounts -- are significantly more likely to make their choices secure, according to research by the University of Plymouth, McGill University and Purdue University. (2018-02-28)

Security gaps identified in Internet protocol 'IPsec'
In collaboration with colleagues from Opole University in Poland, researchers at Horst Görtz Institute for IT Security (HGI) at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) have demonstrated that the Internet protocol 'IPsec' is vulnerable to attacks. The Internet Key Exchange protocol 'IKEv1', which is part of the protocol family, has vulnerabilities that enable potential attackers to interfere with the communication process and intercept specific information. The research results are published on Aug. 16, 2018 at the Usenix Security Symposium. (2018-08-14)

'Security fatigue' can cause computer users to feel hopeless and act recklessly
A new study from National Institute of Standards and Technology researchers found that a majority of the typical computer users they interviewed experienced security fatigue -- weariness or reluctance to deal with computer security -- that often leads users to risky computing behavior at work and in their personal lives. (2016-10-04)

Mayo Clinic researcher says improved detection of bladder tumors reduces cancer recurrence
Making tumors inside the bladder fluoresce red under blue light allows physicians to more easily find and remove them, substantially reducing the rate at which these cancers come back, says a Mayo Clinic physician who is presenting results of a large, multicenter international clinical trial. (2009-04-26)

'Dual login' mechanism found to resist fungal infection in cells
Indiana University researchers have identified how two immune receptors coordinate closely to trigger a powerful response against fungal invaders, which could help advance research on cancer therapies. (2019-11-18)

Galaxy murder mystery
Across the universe, galaxies are being killed and the question scientists want answered is, what's killing them? New research published today by a global team of researchers, based at the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, seeks to answer that question. The study reveals that a phenomenon called ram-pressure stripping is more prevalent than previously thought, driving gas from galaxies and sending them to an early death by depriving them of the material to make new stars. (2017-01-16)

Bitcoin's popular design is being exploited for theft and fraud
The very design features that make Bitcoin technology appealing to its users are also weaknesses being exploited for the theft of the cryptocurrency -- new research reveals. Transparent design features are supposed to promote trust in Bitcoin. However, computer scientists at Lancaster University and Universiti Teknologi MARA (Malaysia) show that these features are presenting opportunities for fraud- undermining trust in the currency. (2017-05-17)

Social engineering: Password in exchange for chocolate
It requires a lot of effort and expense for computer hackers to program a Trojan virus and infiltrate individual or company computers. They are therefore increasingly relying on psychological strategies to manipulate computer users into voluntarily divulging their login details. These methods are known as 'social engineering.' For the first time, psychologists at the University of Luxembourg have conducted a large-scale study (involving 1,208 people) to investigate how people are manipulated into sharing their passwords with complete strangers in return for small gifts. (2016-05-12)

Researchers work to counter a new class of coffee shop hackers
If you're sitting in a coffee shop, tapping away on your laptop, feeling safe from hackers because you didn't connect to the shop's Wi-Fi, think again. The bad guys may be able to see what you're doing just by analyzing the low-power electronic signals your laptop emits even when it's not connected to the Internet. (2015-01-08)

'Brainprint' researchers get $900K in funding
The National Science Foundation has awarded $900,000 in grant funding to researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York to continue investigations into the next-generation of brain biometric technology. The project, (2016-10-26)

Decade of research shows little improvement in websites' password guidance
Leading brands including Amazon and Wikipedia are failing to support users with advice on how to securely protect their data, a study shows. (2018-07-17)

Excessive alcohol use when you're young could have lasting impacts on your brain
Excessive alcohol use accounts for four percent of the global burden of disease, and binge drinking particularly is becoming an increasing health issue. A new review article published Cortex highlights the significant changes in brain function and structure that can be caused by alcohol misuse in young people. (2013-01-30)

New study highlights strong anti-cancer properties of soybeans
First study to report that proteins found in soybeans, could inhibit growth of colon, liver and lung cancers, published in Food Research International. (2013-03-20)

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