Popular Pathogens News and Current Events

Popular Pathogens News and Current Events, Pathogens News Articles.
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Helping hands from within: Live-in bacteria protect plants against infections
Micro-organisms living inside plant roots team up to boost the plant's growth and tolerance to stress. An international research team led by the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) and Wageningen UR reports its discovery in today's issue of the renowned scientific journal Science. (2019-11-01)

New comprehensive study on feeding patterns of tiger mosquitos in Europe
This study, published recently in the international journal Insects, was conducted by researchers from the University of Granada, the Doñana Biological Station, and the Biomedical Research Networking Centre for Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP) (2021-02-23)

'Gut'-throat competition: Research on digestive tract bacteria yields surprising findings
From tiny villages in developing nations to suburban kitchens in the United States, dangerous strains of E. coli bacteria sicken millions of people each year - and kill untold numbers of children. Now, new research gives scientists a better understanding of what is going on in the diarrhea-wracked guts of its victims, and what might be done to prevent or treat it. (2012-05-10)

Houston Methodist launches real-time flu tracker website
Pathologists at Houston Methodist developed a real-time website to track flu cases, just in time to assist physicians, the CDC and patients for the fall 2018 flu season. (2018-12-06)

New insights on how pathogens escape the immune system
The bacterium Salmonella enterica causes gastroenteritis in humans and is one of the leading causes of food-borne infectious diseases. During the infection, the germ is able to trick the immune system. Researchers led by Nirmal Robinson from the Cluster of Excellence for Aging Research CECAD found a mechanism the pathogen uses. They hope to use the gained knowledge in the fight against cancer and other aging-associated diseases. The results are published in the journal PLoS Pathogens. (2017-03-03)

A new view of the immune system
Pathogen epitopes are fragments of bacterial or viral proteins. Nearly a third of all existing human epitopes consist of two different fragments. Known as 'spliced epitopes', these types of epitopes have long been regarded as rare. The fact that they are so highly prevalent might, among other things, explain why the immune system is so highly flexible. Results from this study have been published in the current issue of the journal Science.* (2016-10-21)

UTSA researchers explore little-known, deadly fungal infections
A new study by Althea Campuzano, Ph.D., a student at the University of Texas at San Antonio, and Floyd Wormley, Jr., Professor of Biology and Senior Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies, sheds light on little-known fungal infections caused by the fungus Cryptococcus. There are currently no vaccines available for any fungal infection, which can be extremely deadly to patients under treatment for diseases like HIV, AIDS and cancer. (2018-04-10)

Two-faced bacteria
The gut microbiome, which is a collection of numerous beneficial bacteria species, is key to our overall well-being and good health. Recent studies have linked the gut microbiome with several beneficial properties, such as aiding in the development of our immune system and warding off pathogen infections. (2020-03-05)

Siblings can also differ from one another in bacteria
A research team from the University of Tübingen and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) is investigating how pathogens influence the immune response of their host with genetic variation. This enables Staphylococcus aureus bacteria to develop antibiotic resistance and improve their chances of survival. (2020-07-22)

Worm pheromones protect major crops
Protecting crops from pests and pathogens without using toxic pesticides has been a longtime goal of farmers. Researchers at Boyce Thompson Institute have found that compounds from an unlikely source - microscopic soil roundworms - could achieve this aim. As described in research published in Journal of Phytopathology, these compounds helped protect major crops from various pathogens, and thus have potential to save billions of dollars and increase agricultural sustainability around the world. (2019-07-25)

Bacteria might help other bacteria to tolerate antibiotics better
A new paper by the Dynamical Systems Biology lab at UPF shows that the response by bacteria to antibiotics may depend on other species of bacteria they live with, in such a way that some bacteria may make others more tolerant to antibiotics. (2020-03-12)

HIV-1 genetic diversity is higher in vaginal tract than in blood during early infection
A first-of-its-kind study has found that the genetic diversity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is higher in the vaginal tract than in the blood stream during early infection. This finding, published in PLOS Pathogens, supports the existence of a genetic bottleneck between the vaginal tract and the bloodstream. (2018-01-18)

Case Western Reserve researchers cure drug-resistant infections without antibiotics
Biochemists, microbiologists, drug discovery experts and infectious disease doctors have teamed up in a new study that shows antibiotics are not always necessary to cure sepsis in mice. Instead of killing causative bacteria with antibiotics, researchers treated infected mice with molecules that block toxin formation in bacteria. Every treated mouse survived. The breakthrough study, published in Scientific Reports, suggests infections in humans might be cured the same way. (2018-10-17)

Metagenomic analysis software reveals new causes of superbug emergence
Researchers from ITMO University and Center of Physical and Chemical Medicine developed an algorithm capable of tracking the spread of antibiotic resistance genes in gut microbiota DNA and revealed additional evidence of resistance genes transfer between different bacterial species. The method can not only contribute to the development of effective therapy schemes, but also curb the spread of superbugs. The results of the research were published in 'Bioinformatics' journal. (2017-11-09)

How does the immune system develop in the first days of life?
Researchers highlight the anti-inflammatory response taking place after birth and designed to shield the newborn from infection. Early protection is ensured by the innate immunity through the rapid development of the complement pathway during the first week after birth. (2020-10-22)

Viral probe gives ringside view of cell-to-cell combat
A fascinating blow-by-blow account of the arms struggle between plants and viral pathogens, is revealed in new research. (2018-01-23)

Research paves the way for treatment strategies of multidrug-resistant chronic infections
A new study published in Cell Press finds that antibiotic treatment of chronic infections can be optimized by targeting vulnerabilities of antibiotic-resistant pathogens paving the way for more effective treatment strategies. (2018-01-05)

Children's Hospital scientists identify possible target for prevention and treatment of pneumonia
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC have identified a key protein target that may be a crucial factor in the development of a vaccine to prevent and new therapies to treat pneumonia, the leading killer of children worldwide. (2008-02-11)

Scientists make it possible to rank the risk of resistance genes
A new study published in Nature Communications will help to predict antibiotic resistance evolution and thus guide future drug development. (2018-02-06)

CRISPR reveals the secret life of antimicrobial peptides
Using CRISPR, scientists at EPFL have carried out extensive work on a little-known yet effective weapon of the innate immune system, antimicrobial peptides. (2019-02-26)

Viruses can evolve in parallel in related species
Viruses are more likely to evolve in similar ways in related species -- raising the risk that they will 'jump' from one species to another, new research shows. (2018-04-12)

Antibiotics legitimately available in over-counter throat medications could contribute to increased antibiotic resistance
New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows that the inappropriate of use of antibiotics legitimately available in over-the-counter (OTC) throat medications could be contributing to antibiotic resistance, thereby going against World Health Organization (WHO) goals. (2019-04-11)

Experts raise concerns over raw meat diets for cats and dogs
In the Vet Record today, a team of researchers based in The Netherlands say these diets may be contaminated with bacteria and parasites, and as such may pose a risk to both animal and human health. (2018-01-11)

New insights on mosquitoes that spread disease
The Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) is a highly invasive species and a vector of multiple pathogens including various viruses, such as chikungunya, dengue, and Zika. A new Medical and Veterinary Entomology study that evaluated the relationship between the mosquito's presence and habitat variables at a small scale provides important information for planning effective prevention and control campaigns. (2018-07-09)

New book on Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance from CSHLPress
'Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance' from CSHLPress examines the major classes of antibiotics, together with their modes of action and mechanisms of resistance. Well-established antibiotics (e.g., β-lactams) are covered, as are lesser-used drugs that have garnered recent interest (e.g., polymyxins) and new compounds in the development pipeline. Also examined is how bacteria evolve ways to resist disruptions by modifying the drug or drug target or by controlling access of the drug to the cell. (2016-08-17)

Germs in the kitchen: Salmonella better known than Campylobacter
What health risks are consumers aware of? What are they concerned about? The answers to these questions are provided by the BfR Consumer Monitor, a representative population survey conducted regularly by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR). On the one hand it reflects the public perception in Germany with regard to consumer health protection topics, while on the other hand it is an essential indicator for recognizing possible false estimations on the part of the general public early on. (2017-10-05)

First proof a synthesized antibiotic is capable of treating superbugs
A 'game changing' new antibiotic which is capable of killing superbugs has been successfully synthesized and used to treat an infection for the first time -- and could lead to the first new class of antibiotic drug in 30 years. (2018-03-23)

Trouble with parasites? Just migrate!
The researchers developed a model to explore whether combating infection could, in theory, be a potential benefit of migration. (2016-05-27)

Staphylococcus aureus: A new mechanism involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance
An Institut Pasteur-CNRS research team has characterized a Staphylococcus aureus gene involved in virulence, biofilm formation and resistance to certain antibiotics. These results open up new avenues for understanding the control of S. aureus virulence mechanisms. This work was recently published in the journal PLoS Pathogens. (2018-03-23)

Researchers outline game-theory approach to better understand genetics
Principles of game theory offer new ways of understanding genetic behavior, a pair of researchers has concluded in a new analysis. (2018-09-04)

Can Muesli help against arthritis?
It is well known that healthy eating increases our general sense of wellbeing. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now discovered that a fiber-rich diet can have a positive influence on chronic inflammatory joint diseases, leading to stronger bones. (2018-01-12)

Deciphering plant immunity against parasites
Nematodes are a huge threat to agriculture since they parasitize important crops such as wheat, soybean, and banana; but plants can defend themselves. Researchers at Bonn University, together with collaborators from the Sainsbury Laboratory in Norwich, identified a protein that allows plants to recognize a chemical signal from the worm and initiate immune responses against the invaders. This discovery will help to develop crop plants that feature enhanced protection against this type of parasites. (2017-04-13)

How tumor necrosis factor protects against infection
Tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a messenger substance in the immune system, plays an important role in triggering chronic inflammatory diseases. For this reason, TNF inhibitors are a standard form of treatment for patients with rheumatoid arthritis and certain inflammatory bowel diseases. However, TNF also protects against infection, which means that inhibiting it can cause latent infections to resurface. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg have now discovered a new mechanism via which TNF protects against intracellular pathogens that cause infection. (2016-07-11)

Math shows how human behavior spreads infectious diseases
Mathematics can help public health workers better understand and influence human behaviors that lead to the spread of infectious disease, according to a study from the University of Waterloo. (2018-08-16)

Biofilm buster treats drug-resistant infections
Scientists have created a potent antibacterial agent that killed drug-resistant microbes and even eradicated stubborn pathogens growing in biofilms, which can be 10 to 1,000 times more tolerant to antibiotics than free-living bacteria. (2018-01-10)

Variation between strains may account for differences in vulnerability to infection
New research shows that subtle differences between bacterial strains may cause dramatic differences in outcome between people infected with the same microbe. (2018-01-11)

The microbiome of a native plant is much more resilient than expected
The microbiome, which consists of all microorganisms that live on or in plants, animals and also humans, is important for the health and development of these organisms. In a new study published in eLife, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, investigated how a plant responds to manipulations of its microbial associations. The results indicate that the enormous bacterial diversity residing in natural soils may account for the stability of the plant-microbiome relationship. (2018-04-17)

New discovery in the microbiology of serious human disease
Previously undiscovered secrets of how human cells interact with a bacterium which causes a serious human disease have been revealed in new research by microbiologists at The University of Nottingham. (2014-10-03)

Are red imported fire ants all bad?
Red imported fire ants have earned a justifiably bad rap across the south and most Texans would be hard put to name a single redeeming quality the ants have. (2016-10-04)

Deadly cryptococcal fungi found in public spaces in South Africa
This is the first time that both Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii have been found in such large numbers on trees in South Africa. To date, only two studies (one from 2009 and the other published in 2011) have reported the presence of these pathogens in the South African environment. (2017-12-06)

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