Popular Patient Care News and Current Events

Popular Patient Care News and Current Events, Patient Care News Articles.
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Electronic tool has potential to improve asthma care, study finds
A new electronic decision support tool for managing asthma has the potential to improve the quality of asthma care in primary care settings, suggests a study led by St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, Canada. (2019-02-14)

Provide stroke patients with palliative care support minus the label
When caring for stroke patients, health care providers should focus on the social and emotional issues facing patients, rather than only physical rehabilitation, according to a new study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2018-03-05)

3-D printing helps treat woman with spinal condition
Clinicians recently used 3-D printing to help treat a woman with a degenerative condition of the spinal column. (2017-04-20)

Two studies explore gender, language, and treatment setting as barriers in screening and patient care in lung cancer
More people die of lung cancer than any other type of cancer, and two new studies from CHEST 2017 reveal disparities in lung cancer screening and care that may impact detection, as well as mortality and survival rates in the disease. (2017-10-23)

High-deductible health care plans curb both cost and usage, including preventive care
A team of researchers based at IUPUI has conducted the first systematic review of studies examining the relationship between high-deductible health care plans and the use of health care services. They found these plans reduce both the cost and the use of health care services, according to an article published in the October issue of the journal Health Affairs. (2017-10-03)

ICU care for COPD, heart failure and heart attack may not be better
Does a stay in the intensive care unit give patients a better chance of surviving a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or heart failure flare-up or even a heart attack, compared with care in another type of hospital unit? Unless a patient is clearly critically ill, the answer may be no, according to University of Michigan researchers who analyzed more than 1.5 million Medicare records. (2017-02-17)

Drug safety for penguins
Researchers from the University of Liverpool have determined the most effective drug dose to help penguins in managed care fight off disease. (2017-08-04)

Telemedicine as effective as in-person care for Parkinson's disease
New findings from a nationwide program that links neurologists with patients with Parkinson's disease in their homes via video conferencing shows that telemedicine can successfully deliver quality care. The study, which appears today in the journal Neurology, points to a new way to improve care for people who suffer from the disease, but may have not have access to a neurologist. (2017-08-16)

Health care leaders predict patients will lose under President Trump's health care plans
According to a newly released NEJM Catalyst Insights Report, health care executives and industry insiders expect patients -- more than any other stakeholder -- to be the big losers of any comprehensive health care plan from the Trump administration. (2017-04-20)

Talking to doctors about your bucket list could help advance care planning
For physicians, asking patients about their bucket lists, or whether they have one, can encourage discussion about making their medical care fit their life plans, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. (2018-02-08)

Referrals by private ERs are prevalent in communities with a public hospital
The practice of indirect referrals by nonpublic emergency departments and their affiliated physicians are prevalent in communities with a public hospital option. Uninsured patients are the most affected. (2017-12-27)

Diagnosis is a collaborative process
According to family physician Norbert Donner-Banzhoff, building an effective relationship with a patient and making a diagnosis are not separate skills. Rather, diagnosing a patient efficiently and effectively is a process best shared by patient and physician. (2018-07-10)

New research on why GPs quit patient care
The research aimed to identify factors influencing GPs' decisions about whether or not to remain in direct patient care, and what might help to retain them in the role. Three reasons emerged: a sense that general practice based primary care was under-valued within the healthcare system; concerns regarding professional risk encountered in delivering care in an increasingly complex health environment; and finally, considerations about leaving or remaining in direct patient care and the options and choices that GPs felt were available to them. (2018-02-02)

Social, public health services crucial in fight against HIV/AIDS
Patients at risk for HIV need to be linked to services -- such as mental health and syringe exchange programs -- that will help them stay in care, adhere to medication and avoid reinfection, a new University of Michigan study suggests. (2018-03-19)

Low value surgical procedures should be avoided to reduce costs and improve patient care
Reducing the use of 'low value' interventions that deliver little benefit is vital to cut healthcare costs. (2017-11-08)

More people miss NHS appointments when the clocks go forward
The number of missed hospital outpatient appointments increases following the clock change on March 25 2018. Patients are 5% more likely to miss an appointment in the week after the clocks go forward compared with the previous week. NHS figures show that there were 8 million missed appointments in 2016/17. Each hospital outpatient appointment costs £120 so missed appointments represent a significant financial issue for the NHS and have a negative impact on patient care. (2018-03-23)

Relying on Dr. Google to diagnose eye problems may be dangerous to your health
A study examining the diagnoses generated by WebMD Symptom Checker showed the online tool was correct only 26 percent of the time. And the recommendation for the top diagnosis was often inappropriate, at times recommending self-care at home instead of going to the emergency room. (2018-10-29)

Addressing food insecurity in health care settings
A review of articles covering food insecurity interventions in health care settings from 2000-2018 found that interventions focused on either referrals or direct provision of food or vouchers both suffered from poor follow-up, a general lack of comparison groups, and limited statistical power and generalizability. (2019-09-09)

Exploring 'clinical conundrum' of asthma-COPD overlap in nonsmokers with chronic asthma
Researchers may be closer to finding the mechanism responsible for loss of lung elastic recoil and airflow limitation in nonsmokers with chronic asthma. The study published today in the journal CHEST Unraveling the Pathophysiology of the Asthma-COPD Overlap Syndrome reported that both nonsmokers and smokers with chronic asthma share features of COPD. This conundrum, often referred to as asthma-COPD overlap syndrome, has been assumed to be due to large and especially small airway remodeling. (2015-08-05)

Algorithm shows differences between nurse, doctor care
A multidisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago has published the first quantitative study on the divergent scopes of practice for nurses and doctors. The study uniquely leveraged computer science technology to compare individual-level patient care provided by nurses and doctors using information routinely documented in the electronic health record. (2018-03-08)

Language matters in end-of-life conversations
In general, the term 'medical futility' applies when, based on data and professional experience, no further treatments, procedures or tests will provide benefit and may, in fact, be more burdensome and create undue suffering for the patient and the patient's family. (2018-02-02)

Improving pain care through implementation of the Stepped Care Model for Pain Management
A new study published in the Journal of Pain Research provides evidence that implementation of a Stepped Care Model for Pain Management has the potential to more adequately treat chronic pain. (2016-11-14)

Study: Technology and doctors combine to detect patients who don't take their pills
Almost everyone does it at some point -- skip a dose of a medication, decide to not schedule a recommended follow-up appointment or ignore doctor's orders to eat or exercise differently. Such nonadherence can seem harmless on an individual level, but costs the U.S. health care system billions of dollars a year. Now, Johns Hopkins researchers have shown how to best identify nonadherent patients, combining technology with the perceptions of health care providers. (2019-01-03)

Multimodal intervention can reduce PIVC insertion in the emergency department
Peripheral intravenous cannula (PIVC) insertion in the emergency department can be reduced using a multimodal approach designed to support critical thinking and promote clinically appropriate peripheral intravenous cannula insertion and use. (2017-12-27)

Program will train mental health providers, improve health care in rural Missouri
A new graduate education program at the University of Missouri has received nearly $700,000 from the Health Resources and Services Administration in the US Department of Health and Human Services to train psychology doctoral candidates in integrated, primary health care settings, in an effort to improve health care for underserved populations with mental health and physical disorders. (2016-08-09)

The dilemma of screening for prostate cancer
Primary care providers are put in a difficult position when screening their male patients for prostate cancer -- some guidelines suggest that testing the general population lacks evidence whereas others state that it is appropriate in certain patients. Now a new perspective piece offers some guidance on when to screen patients and how to involve them in decisions about screening and treatment. (2015-10-14)

Spectrum Health Study finds delay in initial dementia diagnosis
A Spectrum Health study has found that dementia patients are not undergoing evaluation at the onset of the dementia process, a delay that prevents early, beneficial treatment. Researchers retrospectively reviewed 110 randomly-chosen initial evaluations from the Spectrum Health Medical Group Neurocognitive Clinic. They found that 78.9 percent of the patients evaluated already had moderate or severe dementia at the time of diagnosis. The study suggests that home-based, patient-centered care may improve early screening and detection. (2018-03-15)

Decision support systems may improve quality of patient surgical care
New research published in the February issue of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA), illustrates how physician anesthesiologists are investigating the challenges and opportunities of integrating patient data, to aid clinicians in patient management, through clinical decision support technologies. (2018-01-24)

Primary care doctors may be unsure when kids' bad moods are serious or not
Family medicine doctors and pediatricians are less confident than psychiatrists in their abilities to tell the difference between normal irritability and possibly bigger issues in children and adolescents, according to Penn State researchers. Primary care providers and pediatricians were also more likely to prescribe medications when they thought there was a problem, while psychiatrists were more likely to start with behavioral therapy. (2018-04-05)

Interactive virtual reality enhances physicians' treatment planning of complex conditions
Interactive virtual reality (VR) brings medical images to life on screen, showing interventional radiologists a patient's unique internal anatomy to help physicians effectively prepare and tailor their approach to complex treatments, such as splenic artery aneurysm repair, according to new research being presented today at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2018 Annual Scientific Meeting. (2018-03-18)

ASCO and Cancer Care Ontario update guideline on radiation therapy for prostate cancer
The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and Cancer Care Ontario today issued a joint clinical practice guideline update on brachytherapy (internal radiation) for patients with prostate cancer. The update provides evidence-based recommendations for different patient risk groups, and specifies the most effective forms of brachytherapy. (2017-03-28)

Should all patients be asked about their sexual orientation?
In late 2017, NHS England released guidelines recommending that health professionals ask all patients about their sexual orientation in order to improve services for non-heterosexual patients, but should they? Experts debate the issue in The BMJ today. (2018-01-17)

New study shows electronic health records often capture incomplete mental health data
This study compares information available in a typical electronic health record (EHR) with data from insurance claims, focusing on diagnoses, visits, and hospital care for depression and bipolar disorder. (2016-04-21)

Online physician reviews don't reflect responses in patient satisfaction surveys
Physicians who receive negative reviews online do not receive similar responses in rigorous patient satisfaction surveys, according to new Mayo Clinic research in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2018-04-02)

Seniors more likely to visit emergency department after home care visit from nurse
Patients who received home care visits from nurses were more likely to visit the emergency department during the evening on the same day, particularly for non-urgent issues, according to new research in CMAJ. (2018-04-30)

Researchers shed new light on influenza detection
Notre Dame Researchers have discovered a way to make influenza visible to the naked eye, by engineering dye molecules to target a specific enzyme of the virus. (2017-05-05)

New EASD-ADA consensus guidelines on managing hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes launched at EASD meeting
Following a review of the latest evidence --including a range of recent trials of drug and lifestyle interventions -- the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) have produced an updated consensus statement on how to manage hyperglycaemia (high blood sugar) in patients with type 2 diabetes. (2018-10-05)

Team training can reduce patient mortality by 13 percent
When implemented correctly, health care team training can reduce patient mortality by 13 percent, according to a new review paper by a psychologist at Rice University. (2018-03-13)

Dental checklist of bad practice has patient care at its heart
Dental experts have drawn up a definitive list of never events -- scenarios that patients should never face -- in a bid to ensure excellent patient care worldwide. (2018-05-11)

'Lipofilling' technique found safe for reconstruction after breast cancer surgery
Autologous fat transfer, also known as 'lipofilling,' is a minimally invasive procedure in which the plastic surgeon uses the patient's own fat obtained by liposuction to perform breast reconstruction. (2018-06-06)

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