Popular Patterns News and Current Events

Popular Patterns News and Current Events, Patterns News Articles.
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Impact of global warming on weather patterns underestimated
The impact of global warming on European weather patterns has been underestimated, according to a new report published in Nature this week. The Northern Hemisphere Circulation study found that present climate change models - computer representations of the atmosphere, ocean and land surface - have underestimated the changes in air pressure, leading to an underestimate of the impact of global warming on weather patterns. (2005-09-21)

Distinguishing fatal prostate cancer from 'manageable' cancer now possible
Scientists at the University of York have found a way of distinguishing between fatal prostate cancer and manageable cancer, which could reduce unnecessary surgeries and radiotherapy. (2018-10-18)

DNA exchange among species is major contributor to diversity in Heliconius butterflies
Exchange of genetic material among species played a major role in the wide diversity of Heliconius butterflies, according to a new study, results of which inform a centuries-long debate about the value of hybridization to species evolution. (2019-10-31)

Study clusters health behavior groups to broaden public health interventions
A new study led by a University of Kansas researcher has used national health statistics and identified how to cluster seven health behavior groups based on smoking status, alcohol use, physical activity, physician visits and flu vaccination are associated with mortality. (2017-03-15)

Finding a cell's true identity
In a bid to reveal even more distinctive differences and similarities, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, the Johns Hopkins Institute for Genetic Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Department of Neuroscience developed two new artificial intelligence methods that decipher complex gene activity controlling cell fate decisions in retina development and relate this gene activity to what occurs in other tissues and across different species. (2019-05-28)

Special journal issue brings focus to importance of studying landscape pattern
A new special issue of the journal Landscape Ecology organized by scientists at the USDA Forest Service and North Carolina State University assesses the state of the science of landscape pattern analysis. Appearing three decades after the first scientific papers on landscape patterns were published, the special issue includes 14 articles by scientists tackling current problems in the field, introducing new approaches, and suggesting promising research directions and applications. (2019-09-17)

Obesity is in the eye of the beholder
Doctors have a specific definition of what it means to be overweight or obese, but in the social world, gender, race and generation matter a lot for whether people are judged as 'thin enough' or 'too fat.' (2017-05-18)

Prebiotics may help to cope with stress
Probiotics are well known to benefit digestive health, but prebiotics are less well understood. Recent study in rats shows that prebiotic fibers may help to protect beneficial gut bacteria and restore healthy sleep patterns after a stressful event. (2017-02-10)

Artificial wings reach new limits, thanks to inspiration from earwigs
Inspired by the wings of earwigs, scientists have designed artificial wings that exhibit extraordinary folding abilities. Whereas traditional origami folding techniques are limited by rigidity and number of folding patterns, the technique developed by Jakob A. Faber and colleagues overcomes these challenges. (2018-03-22)

Is evolution predictable?
An international team of scientists working with Heliconius butterflies at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama was faced with a mystery: how do pairs of unrelated butterflies from Peru to Costa Rica evolve nearly the same wing-color patterns over and over again? The answer, published in Current Biology, forever changes the way evolution is understood. (2019-11-14)

Discovering what shapes language diversity
A research team led by Colorado State University is the first to use a form of simulation modeling to study the processes that shape language diversity patterns. (2017-02-10)

Influenza in the tropics shows variable seasonality
Whilst countries in the tropics and subtropics exhibit diverse patterns of seasonal flu activity, they can be grouped into eight geographical zones to optimise vaccine formulation and delivery timing, according to a study published April 27, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE. (2016-04-27)

Only-children more likely to be obese than children with siblings
Families with multiple children tend to make more healthy eating decisions than families with a single child. (2019-11-06)

Study: Climate change reshaping how heat moves around globe
The Earth's atmosphere and oceans play important roles in moving heat from one part of the world to another, and new research is illuminating how those patterns are changing in the face of climate change. (2019-01-28)

'Smart' material enables novel applications in autonomous driving and robotics
Research led by scientists from the University of Luxembourg has shown the potential of liquid crystal shells as enabling material for a vast array of future applications, ranging from autonomous driving to anti-counterfeiting technology and a new class of sensors. (2018-05-29)

'The way you move': Body structure brings coordinated movement
A computer model shows that a starfish-like animal can coordinate rhythmic motion based on body structure without the brain telling them to do so. This provides insights useful for physiology and robotics. (2019-07-12)

Mu­sic and nat­ive lan­guage in­ter­act in the brain
Finnish speakers showed an advantage in auditory duration processing compared to German speakers in a recent doctoral study on auditory processing of sound in people with different linguistic and musical backgrounds. In Finnish speakers, musical expertise was associated with enhanced behavioral frequency discrimination. (2017-11-29)

Scientists shed light on biological roots of individuality
A new study illuminates the biology that guides behavior across different stages of life in worms, and suggests how variations in specific neuromodulators in the developing nervous system may lead to occasional variations. (2018-02-16)

Marine animals explore the ocean in similar ways
Marine animals of different body size, shape and mode of movement, move through the ocean in similar ways. (2018-02-26)

Can we imitate organisms' abilities to decode water patterns for new technologies?
The shape of water. Can it tell us about what drives romance? Among fish, it might. Eva Kanso, a professor of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering studies fluid flows and almost like a forensic expert, Kanso, along with her team, is studying how aquatic signals are transported through the water. (2018-04-05)

Danger ahead?
A major shift in western Arctic wind patterns occurred throughout the winter of 2017 and the resulting changes in sea ice movement are possible indicators of a changing climate, says Kent Moore, a professor of physics at the University of Toronto Mississauga. (2018-03-20)

Study of social contact patterns in Hong Kong will give insight into spread of epidemic
The first ever long-term study of patterns of social contact in Hong Kong will improve our knowledge of the growth of epidemics. Hong Kong was where SARS emerged in 2002-2003. The study looked at the number and type of social encounters made by 1,450 residents. This is affected by age but 'supermixers' are not necessarily more likely to contract or spread disease. (2018-02-01)

Relationship quality tied to good health for young adults
For young people entering adulthood, high-quality relationships are associated with better physical and mental health, according to the results of a recently published study by a University at Buffalo-led research team. (2016-06-24)

Even the tiniest aerosol particles can kick up a storm
A new study suggests that tiny aerosol particles from pollution plumes have a greater influence on stormy weather over pristine regions of the world, such as oceans and large forests, than previously believed. (2018-01-25)

Model successfully predicts large river system fish diversity
While scientists have developed methods to predict aspects of fish diversity in specific river locations, a model to understand what factors may drive a comprehensive suite of fish biodiversity patterns in a large and complex system of rivers has been elusive. Now a group of researchers reports success using a so-called (2008-05-08)

Physical inactivity and restless sleep exacerbate genetic risk of obesity
Low levels of physical activity and inefficient sleep patterns intensify the effects of genetic risk factors for obesity, according to results of a large-scale study presented at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2017 Annual Meeting in Orlando, Fla. These results confirm and strengthen previous findings based on self-reported activity. (2017-10-20)

The moiré patterns of three layers change the electronic properties of graphene
Combining an atomically thin graphene and a boron nitride layer at a slightly rotated angle changes their electrical properties. Physicists at the University of Basel have now shown for the first time the combination with a third layer can result in new material properties also in a three-layer sandwich of carbon and boron nitride. This significantly increases the number of potential synthetic materials, report the researchers in the scientific journal Nano Letters. (2019-03-08)

Day and night temperature differences influence global patterns in leaf size
A comprehensive analysis of global patterns in leaf size offers an answer to one of the longest-standing questions in plant ecology -- why plant leaf size increases at lower latitudes -- scientists now report. (2017-08-31)

Swansea University research helps break ground to clean up land
Researchers at Swansea University's Complex Flow Lab have been exploring the intricate shapes that emerge when air is injected into soil. Published in Physical Review Applied, these findings could one day be used to speed up the decontamination of industrial brownfield sites?which the United Kingdom currently has over 400,000 hectares of. (2018-01-22)

Opioid prescribing patterns of oral and maxillofacial surgeons: A nationwide survey
At the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Brandon Michael Syme, University of Iowa College of Dentistry, Iowa City, presented a poster titled 'Opioid Prescribing Patterns of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons: A Nationwide Survey.' The AADR/CADR Annual Meeting is in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., USA from March 21-24, 2018. (2018-03-23)

Shrimp-inspired camera may enable underwater navigation
The underwater environment may appear to the human eye as a dull-blue, featureless space. However, a vast landscape of polarization patterns appear when viewed through a camera that is designed to see the world through the eyes of many of the animals that inhabit the water. (2018-04-04)

Potential seen for tailoring treatment for acute myeloid leukemia
Rapid screening of leukemia cells for drug susceptibility and resistance are bringing scientists closer to patient-tailored treatment for acute myeloid leukemia. Research on the differing drug response patterns of leukemia stem cells and blasts may show why some attempts to treat are not successful and why some patients relapse. (2018-12-07)

Examination of outpatient prescribing patterns for anxiety drugs
Benzodiazepines (tranquilizers) are a large class of drugs with lots of potential uses from treating anxiety to other conditions including insomnia, seizures and neuropathic pain. This study used nationally representative data to examine patterns in outpatient prescribing of benzodiazepines and included more than 386,000 ambulatory care visits from 2003 through 2015. (2019-01-25)

Printed thermo-plasmonic heat patterns for neurological disorder treatment
A KAIST team presented a highly customized neural stimulation method. The research team developed a technology that can print the heat pattern on a micron scale to enable the control of biological activities remotely. (2018-04-06)

Memory boost with just one look
HRL Laboratories, LLC, researchers have published results showing that targeted transcranial electrical stimulation during slow-wave sleep can improve metamemories of specific episodes by 20% after only one viewing of the episode, compared to controls. The same technology may offer a non-invasive treatment to mitigate bad memories that might cause post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Metamemory describes the sensitivity of whether memories are recalled accurately or not, such as during eyewitness testimony. (2020-01-14)

Pairing zebrafish by personality improves fitness of the species
Scientists have challenged the theory of 'love at first sight' after discovering that they can boost the reproductive success of zebrafish by pairing them by personality, rather than appearance. (2018-09-20)

Forests worldwide threatened by drought
Forests around the world are at risk of death due to widespread drought, University of Stirling researchers have found. (2017-02-22)

What dinosaurs' color patterns say about their lives
After reconstructing the color patterns of a well-preserved dinosaur from China, researchers have found that the long-lost species called Psittacosaurus was light on its underside and darker on top. This color pattern, known as countershading, is a common form of camouflage in modern animals. The findings reported in Current Biology on Sept. 15 lead the researchers to conclude that Psittacosaurus most likely lived in an environment with diffuse light, such as in a forest. (2016-09-15)

Infants are able to learn abstract rules visually
Three-month-old babies cannot sit up or roll over, yet they are already capable of learning patterns from simply looking at the world around them, according to a recent Northwestern University study published in PLOS One. For the first time, the researchers show that 3- and 4-month-old infants can successfully detect visual patterns and generalize them to new sequences. (2018-02-22)

UT study IDs potential cell receptors to reduce antibiotic resistance
The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections. The pathogen is resistant to many antibiotics so treating those infections, particularly in patients with compromised immune systems, is difficult. A new study from UT has identified certain chemical receptors in cells that could deceive the bacteria and improve patient response to drugs. (2017-11-15)

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