Popular Pelvic Organ Prolapse News and Current Events

Popular Pelvic Organ Prolapse News and Current Events, Pelvic Organ Prolapse News Articles.
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Fat cells may influence how the body reacts to heart failure, study shows
University of Alberta researchers have found that limiting the amount of fat the body releases into the bloodstream from fat cells when in heart failure could help improve outcomes for patients. (2021-02-23)

'Body on a chip' could improve drug evaluation
MIT engineers have developed new technology that could be used to evaluate new drugs and detect possible side effects before they are approved for human use. Using a microfluidic chip that connects tissue samples from up to 10 organs, the researchers can accurately replicate human organ interactions, allowing them to measure the effects of drugs on different parts of the body. (2018-03-14)

Tuberculosis drugs work better with vitamin C
Studies in mice and in tissue cultures suggest that giving vitamin C with tuberculosis drugs could reduce the unusually long time it takes these drugs to eradicate this pathogen. The research is published in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (2018-01-03)

The galloping evolution in seahorses
A genome project, comprising six evolutionary biologists from Professor Axel Meyer's research team from Konstanz and researchers from China and Singapore, sequenced and analyzed the genome of the tiger tail seahorse. (2016-12-14)

Small changes to organ procurement system could lead to more life-saving transplants
Slight changes to the system for allocating deceased-donor kidneys could result in higher rates of organ procurement and lead to more kidney transplants across the country, according to new research co-authored by an Indiana University Kelley School of Business professor. (2017-11-17)

UTSA researchers explore little-known, deadly fungal infections
A new study by Althea Campuzano, Ph.D., a student at the University of Texas at San Antonio, and Floyd Wormley, Jr., Professor of Biology and Senior Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies, sheds light on little-known fungal infections caused by the fungus Cryptococcus. There are currently no vaccines available for any fungal infection, which can be extremely deadly to patients under treatment for diseases like HIV, AIDS and cancer. (2018-04-10)

Green tea may protect the bladder from becoming inflamed
Herbal agents could be used to treat inflammatory bladder diseases, according to a preliminary study that looked at the ability of green tea to protect bladder cells from inflammation. The University of Pittsburgh study found that components of green tea protected bladder cells from damage in culture. Green tea, reported to have many health benefits, is rich in powerful antioxidants that make it a desired remedy for many medical conditions. (2007-05-20)

What is association of radioactive iodine treatment for overactive thyroid with risk of cancer death?
Radioactive iodine has been used since the 1940s to treat hyperthyroidism, an overactive thyroid. This study is an extension of one that has followed patients in the United States and the United Kingdom treated for hyperthyroidism for nearly 70 years. Researchers sought to determine the association of doses of radioactive iodine absorbed by organs or tissue with overall and site-specific cancer death. (2019-07-01)

Anesthetics have the same effects on plants as they have on animals and humans
A new study published in Annals of Botany has shown that plants react to anesthetics similarly to the way animals and humans do, suggesting plants are ideal objects for testing anesthetics actions in future. (2017-12-11)

Surprising research result: All immature cells can develop into stem cells
New sensational study conducted at the University of Copenhagen disproves traditional knowledge of stem cell development. The study reveals that the destiny of intestinal cells is not predetermined, but instead determined by the cells' surroundings. The new knowledge may make it easier to manipulate stem cells for stem cell therapy. The results have just been published in Nature. (2019-05-16)

Options for making sex more enjoyable at any age
Women at any age should be able to enjoy sex. Unfortunately, sexual function and comfort often decreases for women during the menopause transition. A presentation at The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) Annual Meeting in San Diego, Oct. 3-6, will highlight the many nonhormone and also hormone therapy options currently available to help women stay sexually active, even if they suffer from genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM). (2018-10-03)

Health and spirituality values influence attendance for pelvic-floor dysfunction treatment
New research from psychologists and health professionals in Swansea has found that the types of life values that patients hold affect their attendance at medical treatment for pelvic-floor dysfunction, a condition affecting over 25 percent of all women in the UK. (2017-12-15)

Research finds hysterectomy alone associated with increased long-term health risks
Mayo Clinic researchers show that hysterectomy with ovarian conservation is associated with a significantly increased risk of several cardiovascular diseases and metabolic conditions. The findings are published in Menopause. (2018-01-03)

The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Oldest ever schistosomiasis egg found may be first proof of early human technology exacerbating disease burden
The discovery of a schistosomiasis parasite egg in a 6200-year-old grave at a prehistoric town by the Euphrates river in Syria may be the first evidence that agricultural irrigation systems in the Middle East contributed to disease burden, according to new Correspondence published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases. (2014-06-19)

3-D tissue model of developing heart could help drug safety testing for pregnant women
A Syracuse University engineering team has developed a process that combines biomaterials-based cell patterning and stem cell technology to make a 3-D tissue model that could mimic early stage human heart development. Embryotoxicity is just one potential use of the modeling platform. (2018-03-16)

New findings about why losartan is effective in treating Marfan syndrome may reshape our thinking about patient management
Progressive dilation of the aortic root is considered one of the most serious manifestations of Marfan syndrome. The antihypertensive losartan is one of the two medications recommended by current guidelines attenuate the progression of this aortic enlargement, but which medication works best is still controversial. A new report in The American Journal of Pathology confirms losartan's efficacy but finds that the underlying mechanism of action is different than previously thought, opening up new possibilities for improvements in Marfan syndrome management. (2018-02-09)

Brothers in arms: The brain and its blood vessels
The brain and its surrounding blood vessels exist in a close relationship. Researchers from the MPI of Immunobiology and Epigenetics have discovered how cells of the blood vessels sense the metabolic condition of the brain and alter vascular function in response. The result could be important for patients with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's because the onset of these age-related diseases coincides with vascular defects and breakdown of vascular function in the brain. (2020-06-15)

Long-term prevention of organ rejection
The Konstanz immunologist Professor Marcus Groettrup and his team have developed a procedure for preventing organ rejection in rats after renal transplantation, and for suppressing the creation of antibodies in the recipients' immune systems. Immunoproteasome inhibition, which suppresses the production of antibodies, is crucial to this process. The research results were published in Kidney International. The title of the original publication is: 'Immunoproteasome inhibition prevents chronic antibody-mediated allograft rejection in renal transplantation.' (2017-12-08)

A new tool for improving uterine transplant surgery
Future Science Group (FSG) today announced the publication of an article in Future Science OA demonstrating the first use of multispectral imaging in gynecology, in a uterine transplant setting. (2018-02-12)

Stephanie Faubion, M.D., talks genitourinary syndrome of menopause
A new article in Mayo Clinic Proceedings reviews options for women going through genitourinary syndrome of menopause -- an encompassing term for vaginal dryness, itching, dyspareunia and urinary tract infections brought on by low estrogen levels after menopause. (2017-12-01)

Relocation of proteins with a new nanobody tool
Researchers at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel have developed a new method by which proteins can be transported to a new location in a cell. The novel tool enables scientists to study the function of proteins depending on their position by using nanobodies. The tool can be used for a wide range of proteins and in various areas of developmental biology. The scientific journal eLife has published the results. (2017-04-11)

Symptom screening plus a simple blood test improves early detection of ovarian cancer
Women's reports of persistent, recent-onset symptoms linked to ovarian cancer -- abdominal or pelvic pain, difficulty eating or feeling full quickly and abdominal bloating -- when combined with the CA125 blood test may improve the early detection of ovarian cancer by 20 percent. (2008-06-23)

What does 'dead' mean?
Marking the 50-year legacy of a landmark Harvard report on brain death, a new special report published by The Hastings Center examines lingering questions about the definition of death, implications for organ transplantation, and lessons from the case of Jahi McMath. (2019-01-04)

Faulty sensing: Cellular energy sensor linked to the progression of chronic kidney disease
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with energy depletion in kidney cells, resulting in reduced kidney function. Researchers at TMDU and Kyushu University found that failure of an important cellular energy sensor to detect energy depletion is key to the progression of CKD. However, by stimulating the activity of the sensor using alternative methods, the researchers could halt CKD progression and repair some of the tissue damage. This mechanism therefore represents a novel therapeutic target. (2018-12-07)

Biomarker tests could someday help improve outcomes for organ transplant patients
Organ transplants save lives, but the story doesn't end when a patient emerges from the operating room. Rejection episodes, in which the immune system rallies against the new organ, can occur. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, researchers are turning to biomarkers to help them get a better idea of which patients are more likely to have an episode. (2018-01-31)

Working to reduce brain injury in newborns
Research-clinicians at Children's National Health System led the first study to identify a promising treatment to reduce or prevent brain injury in newborns who have suffered hypoxia-ischemia, a serious complication in which restricted blood flow deprives the brain of oxygen. (2017-11-10)

Alternatives to whole liver transplants for children have become safer, study finds
In a new Johns Hopkins study of patient and graft survival trends for pediatric liver transplant recipients between 2002 and 2015, researchers found that outcomes for alternatives to whole liver transplantation (WLT), such as splitting a liver for two recipients or using a part of a liver from a living donor, have improved significantly. (2018-02-12)

Researchers develop new technique to model transplantation of the human liver
A novel technology developed by researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital enables the model-ing of human liver transplantation in an experimental setting. (2017-11-29)

Estrogen levels do not rise for transgender men treated with testosterone therapy
Testosterone therapy is not associated with a rise in estrogen levels among transgender men, according to a new study led by Boston Medical Center (BMC). In fact, the researchers observed an initial decline in estrogen levels, which later stabilized and remained within the normal range during the study's six-year period. (2018-03-27)

Scientists discover new nanoparticle, dubbed exomeres
A new cellular messenger discovered by Weill Cornell Medicine scientists may help reveal how cancer cells co-opt the body's intercellular delivery service to spread to new locations in the body. (2018-02-21)

Urinary markers may indicate prognosis after kidney transplantation
A new British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology study indicates that certain markers can help predict which patients may experience problems after receiving an organ transplant. (2017-09-07)

Blood vessel-on-a-chips show anti-cancer drug effects in human cells
Researchers at the Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo, and LIMMS/CNRS-IIS a joint French - Japanese research laboratory between the CNRS and the University of Tokyo, report new organ-on-a-chip technology to observe sprouting angiogenesis from a single blood vessel. VEGF stimulated new capillaries from the single vessel by activating NOTCH signaling, recapitulating biochemical events of the human angiogenesis. The chip also confirmed the effects of two FDA-approved anti-angiogenic drugs, demonstrating its applicability to drug discovery. (2018-01-30)

NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia leads research into robotic surgery for kidney cancer
Clinical research at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center is helping bring the advantages of robotic surgery, including reduced pain and quicker recovery, to kidney cancer patients. (2008-07-28)

Organ-on-chip technology enters next stage as experts test hepatitis B virus
Scientists at Imperial College London have become the first in the world to test how pathogens interact with artificial human organs. (2018-02-14)

Chlorinated lipids predict lung injury and death in sepsis patients
Researchers studied blood samples taken from patients diagnosed with sepsis and found that elevated chlorinated lipids predicted whether a patient would go on to suffer acute respiratory distress symptom (ARDS) and die within 30 days from a lung injury. (2018-01-31)

Candida albicans: Progress in the understanding of the mechanisms of genetic diversification in a major fungal pathogen of humans
Candida albicans is a fungal species causing infection in humans. A team of scientists decided to sequence and analyze the genomes of 182 strains of C. albicans from around the world. They confirmed the clonal reproduction of this human pathogen but also showed that parasexual reproduction, previously only observed in a laboratory setting, contributes to the genetic diversity of C. albicans and therefore also to its ability to adapt to new environments and rid itself of deleterious mutations. (2018-07-09)

Opioid crisis leads to rise in viable hearts and lungs for those awaiting transplants
A new study published in The New England Journal of Medicine by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and University of Utah, examines survival outcomes for patients who have received organs from donors who died of drug intoxication. (2018-05-16)

Genitourinary injuries challenge returning US servicemen
In an article in The Journal of Urology, researchers from the US military medical community have examined the extent and severity of genitourinary injuries among nearly 1,400 US service members (SMs) and emphasize the critical need for novel treatments to improve sexual, urinary, or reproductive function among those with severe genital injury. (2017-01-09)

New study: Pine bark significantly reduces endometriosis
A new study to be published in an upcoming edition of the Journal of Reproductive Medicine reveals that Pycnogenol, an antioxidant plant extract from the bark of the French maritime pine tree, significantly reduces symptoms of endometriosis by 33 percent. (2007-03-07)

Yale procedure cuts recurrence of aggressive uterine cancer
A state-of-the-art treatment program developed at Yale School of Medicine increases survival from the aggressive uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) and spares some patients the need for additional therapy. (2005-09-22)

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