Popular Peptides News and Current Events

Popular Peptides News and Current Events, Peptides News Articles.
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Researchers reveal genetic predisposition to severe COVID-19
HSE University researchers have become the first in the world to discover genetic predisposition to severe COVID-19. The results of the study were published in the journal Frontiers in Immunology. http://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2021.641900 (2021-02-23)

New cancer vaccine platform a potential tool for efficacious targeted cancer therapy
Researchers at the University of Helsinki have discovered a solution in the form of a cancer vaccine platform for improving the efficacy of oncolytic viruses used in cancer treatment. (2018-10-05)

New transgenic rat model may enable better understanding of amyloid buildup in cerebral blood vessels
In a report in The American Journal of Pathology investigators describe the generation of a successful novel transgenic rat model that accumulates amyloid specifically in brain blood vessels and strongly mimics many of the associated detrimental changes that are observed in humans - a condition known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), which is also commonly observed in Alzheimer disease. (2018-11-13)

New tool for prognosis and choice of therapy for rheumatoid arthritis
In rheumatoid arthritis, antibodies are formed that affect the inflammation in the joints. In an article published today in the journal Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, researchers at Uppsala University show that antibodies against the cartilage protein collagen II are associated with a good prognosis. (2017-03-23)

A versatile method to pattern functionalized nanowires
A team of researchers from Hokkaido University has developed a versatile method to pattern the structure of 'nanowires,' providing a new tool for the development of novel nanodevices. (2016-09-09)

En route to custom-designed natural products
Microorganisms often assemble natural products similar to industrial assembly lines. Certain enzymes, non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) play a key role in this process. Biotechnologists at Goethe University have now been able to discover how these enzymes interact with each other. This brings them one step closer to their goal of engineering the production of such peptide natural products. (2018-10-19)

Fixing a broken heart: Exploring new ways to heal damage after a heart attack
The days immediately following a heart attack are critical for survivors' longevity and long-term healing of tissue. Now researchers at Northwestern University and University of California, San Diego have designed a method to deliver a regenerative material through a noninvasive catheter to the affected area of the heart. Once there, the body's inflammatory response signals the peptides to form nanofibers similar to the body's extracellular matrix, which degrades following a heart attack. This preclinical research was conducted in a rodent model. (2019-04-23)

CRISPR reveals the secret life of antimicrobial peptides
Using CRISPR, scientists at EPFL have carried out extensive work on a little-known yet effective weapon of the innate immune system, antimicrobial peptides. (2019-02-26)

Novel methodology increases resolution in oligodendrocyte proteomics
Brazilian researchers combine mass spectrometry, 2D liquid chromatography and ion mobility to identify over 10,000 proteins in brain cells possibly involved in schizophrenia. The innovation even enabled the identification, in samples, of proteins some 10 million times smaller in quantity than those of the most highly expressed molecules. (2018-01-03)

How exercise could help fight drug addiction
The siren call of addictive drugs can be hard to resist, and returning to the environment where drugs were previously taken can make resistance that much harder. However, addicts who exercise appear to be less vulnerable to the impact of these environmental cues. Now, research with mice suggests that exercise might strengthen a drug user's resolve by altering the production of peptides in the brain, according to a study in the journal ACS Omega. (2018-11-14)

Hatchet enzyme, enabler of sickness and of health, exposed by neutron beams
A pioneering glimpse at an enzyme inside elusive cell membranes illuminates a player in cell health but also in hepatitis C and in Alzheimer's. With neutron beams, researchers open a portal into the hidden world of intramembrane proteins, which a third of the human genome is required to create. (2018-02-02)

Opioids produce analgesia via immune cells
Opioids are the most powerful painkillers. Researchers at the Charité -- Universitätsmedizin Berlin have now found that the analgesic effects of opioids are not exclusively mediated by opioid receptors in the brain, but can also be mediated via the activation of receptors in immune cells. Results from this research have been published in the journal Brain, Behavior, and Immunity. (2017-01-17)

Helmholtz researchers get to grips with a herpesvirus
Human herpesvirus 6 infects most people all over the world. It is usually well controlled by the body, but it can cause diseases in immunocompromised individuals. As reported in PLOS Pathogens, scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München, member in the German Center for Infection Research, have now identified virus structures that can be attacked by killer T cells -- a possible approach for new therapies. (2018-04-27)

Improved treatment for alcohol use disorders, chronic pain, mood disorders
A Purdue University team is making drug discoveries to support millions around the world dealing with alcohol use disorders, chronic pain and mood disorders. They discovered that two peptides -- which are naturally metabolic products of Rubisco, a large protein found in many plants like spinach -- may aid in the development of new medications. (2019-01-03)

Better contrast agents based on nanoparticles
Scientists at the University of Basel have developed nanoparticles which can serve as efficient contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. This new type of nanoparticles produce around ten times more contrast than the actual contrast agents and are responsive to specific environments. The journal Chemical Communications has published these results. (2016-08-03)

Biofilm buster treats drug-resistant infections
Scientists have created a potent antibacterial agent that killed drug-resistant microbes and even eradicated stubborn pathogens growing in biofilms, which can be 10 to 1,000 times more tolerant to antibiotics than free-living bacteria. (2018-01-10)

Frog slime kills flu virus
Frogs' skins were known to secrete peptides that defend them against bacteria. The finding suggests that the peptides represent a resource for antiviral drug discovery as well. (2017-04-18)

The microbiome of a native plant is much more resilient than expected
The microbiome, which consists of all microorganisms that live on or in plants, animals and also humans, is important for the health and development of these organisms. In a new study published in eLife, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, investigated how a plant responds to manipulations of its microbial associations. The results indicate that the enormous bacterial diversity residing in natural soils may account for the stability of the plant-microbiome relationship. (2018-04-17)

Inside the brains of killer bees
Africanized honeybees, commonly known as 'killer bees,' are much more aggressive than their European counterparts. Now researchers have examined neuropeptide changes that take place in Africanized honeybees' brains during aggressive behavior. The researchers, who report their results in the Journal of Proteome Research, also showed they could turn gentle bees into angry ones by injecting them with certain peptides. (2018-06-06)

Study yields more than a million new cyclic compounds, some with pharmaceutical potential
Researchers say they can now produce a vast library of unique cyclic compounds, some with the capacity to interrupt specific protein-protein interactions that play a role in disease. The new compounds have cyclic structures that give them stability and enhance their ability to bind to their targets. (2018-03-12)

Peptide-based biogenic dental product may cure cavities
Researchers at the University of Washington have designed a convenient and natural product that uses proteins to rebuild tooth enamel and treat dental cavities. (2018-04-12)

Inflammation: It takes two to tango
Signal molecules called chemokines often work in tandem to recruit specific sets of immune cells to sites of tissue damage. A systematic analysis of their interactions by researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich pinpoints potential targets for new therapies. (2017-04-06)

New genes out of nothing
One key question in evolutionary biology is how novel genes arise and develop. Swedish researchers now show how new genes and functions that are advantageous to bacteria can be selected from random DNA sequences. The results are presented in the scientific journal mBio. (2019-06-04)

Implantable medical devices bolstered by next-gen surface modification
A discovery by Australian researchers could underpin a new class of implantable devices that provide biological signals to surrounding tissue for better integration with the body and reduced risk of infection. The team has developed low-cost, practical techniques to guide and attach peptides to surfaces. Medicine increasingly relies on biomedical devices but their effectiveness is often limited because of unsuccessful integration with the host, necessitating replacement through revision surgery, or the development of untreatable infections. (2018-01-24)

A copper bullet for tuberculosis
Tuberculosis is a sneaky disease, and the number one cause of death from infectious disease worldwide. The bacteria shelter from antibiotics inside the very immune cells that are supposed to kill them, making treatment long and difficult. But in the November issue of ACS Infectious Diseases, UConn chemists report a new antibiotic that can find and kill tuberculosis bacteria where they hide. (2018-10-03)

3D-printed device detects biomarkers of preterm birth
Preterm birth (PTB) -- defined as birth before the 37th week of gestation -- is the leading complication of pregnancy. If doctors had a simple, accurate and inexpensive way to identify women at risk for the condition, they could develop better prevention strategies. Now researchers have created a 3D-printed microchip electrophoresis device that can sensitively detect three serum biomarkers of PTB. They report their results in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry. (2019-05-22)

Dealing a therapeutic counterblow to traumatic brain injury
A team of NJIT biomedical engineers are developing a therapy which shows early indications it can protect neurons and stimulate the regrowth of blood vessels in damaged tissue. (2019-10-03)

Flu infection reveals many paths to immune response
A new study of influenza infection in an animal model broadens understanding of how the immune system responds to flu virus, showing that the process is more dynamic than usually described, engaging a broader array of biological pathways. The researchers say their findings may offer key insights for designing more effective vaccines in general. (2015-09-28)

Simple fats and amino acids to explain how life began
Life is a process that originated 3.5 billion years ago. It emerged when the basic components of the cells that we know today gradually joined, merged, assembled themselves and interacted. At a given moment they turned into autonomous systems and gradually evolved until achieving their current complexity and diversity. A piece of research by the UPV/EHU is working on the start of this trajectory by studying how the chemical molecules assembled themselves so that life could begin. (2017-01-12)

Drug may quell deadly immune response when trauma spills the contents of our cells' powerhouses
When trauma spills the contents of our cell powerhouses, it can evoke a potentially deadly immune response much like a severe bacterial infection. (2018-06-11)

The deadly toxin acrolein has a useful biological role
Scientists from RIKEN in Japan have discovered that acrolein -- a toxic substance produced in cells during times of oxidative stress -- in fact may play a role in preventing the process of fibrillation, an abnormal clumping of peptides that has been associated with Alzheimer's disease and other neural diseases. The key to this new role is a chemical process known as 4+4 cycloaddition. (2016-06-01)

Animal venoms are sources in the search for new medicines
The study of natural toxins and their derivatives may help in the development of medicines to treat diseases like cancer and osteoarthritis, says coordinator of the Center of Excellence in New Target Discovery. (2019-02-14)

Could this widely used food additive cause celiac disease?
A bacterial enzyme that is used to improve food texture and shelf-life has been linked in several studies to celiac disease -- but it is unlabeled and hidden from public knowledge, according to a review published in Frontiers in Pediatrics. (2019-01-03)

What makes the bacteria behind lyme disease tick?
The precise mechanisms of how humans become infected with Lyme disease are still unclear. Researchers from UConn Health are advancing the understanding of how the causative bacterial agent of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb), survives in ticks and mammals. (2018-02-08)

MIT engineers repurpose wasp venom as an antibiotic drug
MIT engineers have repurposed wasp venom as an antibiotic drug that's nontoxic to human cells. (2018-12-07)

Novel approach could limit common complications of immunotherapy
Connecting cancer immunotherapy drugs such as anti-CTLA4 and anti-PD-L1 to peptides that bind to tissues in and around tumors enhanced their effects while limiting adverse events. (2017-11-08)

80-million-year-old dinosaur collagen confirmed
Utilizing the most rigorous testing methods to date, researchers from North Carolina State University have isolated additional collagen peptides from an 80-million-year-old Brachylophosaurus. (2017-01-23)

Deeper insight into viral infections
Würzburg researchers have developed a new analysis technique that sheds more light on viral infections. They used the new method to demonstrate that virus-infected cells produce far more infection-related proteins and peptides than previously thought. (2018-03-19)

Novel anti-cancer nanomedicine for efficient chemotherapy
Researchers have developed a new anti-cancer nanomedicine for targeted cancer chemotherapy. This new nano-tool provides a new approach to use cell-based nanomedicines for efficient cancer chemotherapy. (2019-09-17)

Highly charged molecules behave paradoxically
Chemistry researchers have now discovered how certain small biomolecules attach to one another. The researchers' study also overturns the standard picture -- particles with the same electrical charge appear to be drawn together and not vice versa. The results may be important for the development of new drugs. (2017-11-27)

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