Popular Perception News and Current Events

Popular Perception News and Current Events, Perception News Articles.
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Gay men who 'sound gay' encounter more stigma and discrimination from heterosexual peers
Gay men are more likely than lesbian women to face stigma and avoidant prejudice from their heterosexual peers due to the sound of their voice, a new study in the British Journal of Social Psychology reports. Researchers also found that gay men who believe they sound gay anticipate stigma and are more vigilant regarding the reactions of others. (2021-02-23)

How human cognition can affect the spreading of diseases like Ebola
Psychologists from the University of Sydney and Texas Tech have applied science to health communication and found that the way the message is conveyed can have a significant impact on awareness about diseases, like Ebola, that jump from animals to people. The researchers found that the more animals that are known to carry a virus, the more people will perceive a risk from any animal. (2017-11-08)

Infants' recognition of speech more sophisticated than previously known, NYU researchers find
The ability of infants to recognize speech is more sophisticated than previously known, researchers in NYU's Department of Psychology have found. Their study showed that infants, as early as nine months old, could make distinctions between speech and non-speech sounds in both humans and animals. (2012-07-17)

Scientist emphasizes importance of multi-level thinking
An unusual paper by Prof. Michael E. McIntyre from University of Cambridge touches on a range of deep questions, including insights into the nature of science itself, and of scientific understanding -- what it means to understand a scientific problem in depth -- and into the communication skills necessary to convey that understanding and to mediate collaboration across specialist disciplines. (2017-08-17)

When scientists push people to their tipping point
You probably overestimate just how far someone can push you before you reach your tipping point, new research suggests. A new study tilted people backwards in a device and asked them at what point they thought they would fall if they weren't supported. Most people would have fallen long before they thought they would. (2018-12-10)

Infants understand that more desirable rewards require more effort
Infants who observe someone putting more effort into attaining a goal attribute more value to it, a new study finds. (2017-11-23)

Why musical training benefits us in processing speech
A brain imaging study by Dr. DU Yi from the Institute of Psychology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and her collaborator Dr. Zatorre Robert from the Montréal Neurological Institute and McGill University has revealed that musical training might improve speech perception in noisy environments via enhanced neural foundation in bottom-up auditory encoding, top-down speech motoric prediction, and cross-modal auditory-motor integration. (2017-12-04)

Pong paddles and perception: Our actions influence what we see
Most people think of vision as simply a function of information the eye gathers. For cognitive psychologist Jessica Witt, vision is a little more complicated than that. She has a new paper that faces head-on the notion that her experimental subjects have been victims of a psychological phenomenon called response bias. She employed a classic, action-specific experiment involving a video game familiar to children of the 80s: Pong. (2018-01-03)

Women are naturally more fit than men
Women can process oxygen more quickly than men when they start to exercise, according to a new study from the University of Waterloo. (2017-12-04)

Study reveals lack of self-awareness among doctors when prescribing opioids
As health providers struggle to curb the epidemic of opioid abuse, researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found that 65 percent of emergency department (ED) physicians surveyed underestimated how often they prescribed the highly addictive pain killers to patients. (2018-03-27)

Insight into how infants learn to walk
Ten-week-old babies can learn from practicing walking months before they begin walking themselves. Researchers gave the infants experience at 'reflex walking' which is a primitive instinct in babies which disappears around 12 weeks of age. Results show that brain activity is associated with the perception of walking even at such a young age. (2017-12-14)

Self-esteem key to treating mental health
Improving how mental health patients perceive themselves could be critical in treating them, according to a study from the University of Waterloo. (2018-02-20)

Academic study finds women wearing heavy makeup less likely to be perceived as leaders
Women wearing heavy makeup are less likely to be thought of as good leaders, new research from Abertay University has found. (2018-03-09)

Muscle vibrations improve control over prosthetic hands
An automated brain-computer interface that vibrates the muscles used for control of prosthetic hands helped three amputees gain better movement control over the prosthetic, according to a new study by Paul Marasco and colleagues. (2018-03-14)

Fewer Americans think smoking a pack a day poses a great health risk
About 3 out of 4 Americans agree that smoking cigarettes causes health problems, but public perception of the risks posed by smoking may be declining, according to a Duke Health study published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence. (2018-02-27)

Children who commute to school unaccompanied have greater autonomy and decision-making ability
Results of a UGR research show that children of ages above 10-12 years are more likely to travel to school unaccompanied and in an active way, that is to say, walking or cycling, which give them better safety perceptions and autonomy. (2017-11-27)

Study finds troubling consequences for anti-Muslim and anti-Mexican attitudes and actions
In a study conducted during the 2016 US Republican Primaries, researchers from Penn and Northwestern found that Americans hold dehumanizing views of Muslims and Mexican immigrants, and as a result of feeling dehumanized, these groups become more likely to favor violent action over nonviolent and are less likely to assist with counterterrorism. (2017-02-06)

Oxytocin strengthens mothers' neural responses to infant and adult faces
In a new study from the University of Tampere in Finland, nasally administered oxytocin spray strengthened brain responses to pictures of infant and adult faces in mothers of 1-year-old infants. (2018-02-26)

Study reveals vision's role in vowel perception
In a study based at Brown University, researchers found that the motion and configuration of a speaker's lips are key components of the information people gather when distinguishing vowels in speech. (2018-03-14)

Effect of deployment on use of e-cigarettes in US military
At the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Prescott McWilliams, United States Air Force, San Antonio, Texas and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU), Postgraduate Dental College (PDC), presented a poster titled 'Effect of Deployment on Use of E-Cigarettes in U.S. Military.' The AADR/CADR Annual Meeting is in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., USA from March 21-24, 2018. (2018-03-23)

Contaminants in food: Health risks of natural origin are frequently underestimated
Just under 60 percent of the German population view undesirable substances in food as a high or very high health risk. The most well-known of these substances, which are scientifically denoted as contaminants, are mercury compounds and dioxins. In contrast, only around 13 percent of respondents have heard of the natural contaminants pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) in honey or tea - and only roughly one in three of those who have heard of PAs believe these substances pose a significant health risk. (2017-09-15)

Fear of missing out impacts people of all ages
The social anxiety that other people are having fun without you, also known as FoMO, is more associated with loneliness, low self-esteem and low self-compassion than with age, according to a recent study led by Washington State University psychology professor Chris Barry. (2020-08-26)

Distorted view amongst smokers of when deadly damage caused by smoking will
Smokers have a distorted perception on when the onset of smoking-related conditions will occur, a new study in the Journal of Cognitive Psychology reports. (2018-01-18)

Is there a musical method for interpreting speech?
Vocoded speech, or distorted speech that imitates voice transduction by a cochlear implant, is used throughout acoustic and auditory research to explore speech comprehension under various conditions. Researchers evaluated whether musicians had an advantage in understanding and reciting degraded speech as compared to nonmusicians, and they will present their work on the effect of musical experience on the ability to understand vocoded speech at the 174th ASA Meeting, Dec. 4-8, 2017. (2017-12-07)

Learning in the absence of external feedback
Rewards act as external factors that influence and reinforce learning processes. Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have now been able to show that the brain can produce its own learning signals in cases where no such external feedback is available. A report on the mechanisms underlying these self-generated feedback signals has been published in the current volume of eLife, and shows clear parallels between the neurobiological processes involved in learning based on external and self-generated feedback. (2016-04-06)

Germs in the kitchen: Salmonella better known than Campylobacter
What health risks are consumers aware of? What are they concerned about? The answers to these questions are provided by the BfR Consumer Monitor, a representative population survey conducted regularly by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR). On the one hand it reflects the public perception in Germany with regard to consumer health protection topics, while on the other hand it is an essential indicator for recognizing possible false estimations on the part of the general public early on. (2017-10-05)

Going the distance: Brain cells for 3D vision discovered
Scientists at Newcastle University have discovered neurons in insect brains that compute 3D distance and direction. Understanding these could help vision in robots. (2019-06-28)

Researchers increase understanding of coarse-to-fine human visual perception
In a recent study published in Neuron, Dr. WANG Wei's lab at the Institute of Neuroscience of the Chinese Academy of Sciences revealed an unexpected neural clustering preserving visual acuity from V1 into V4, enabling the spatiotemporal separation of processing local and global features along the hierarchy. The study for the first time showed an unexpected compartmentation of area V4 into SF-selective functional domains that extend to high visual acuity. (2018-03-29)

Thalamus and cerebral cortex interactions influence the decision on sensory perceptions
When we receive a stimulus, sensory information is transmitted by the afferent nerves to the thalamus which in turn, like a relay, forwards the information to the sensory cortex to process it and consciously perceive the stimulus. But, does this information travel only in the thalamus-cortex direction? And, is this 'journey' a determining factor in the subsequent conscious perception of this stimulus? (2019-04-01)

Analysis reveals barriers to routine HIV testing in high-income countries
A new HIV Medicine study identified several barriers to routine HIV testing in emergency departments and acute medical units in the UK and US. (2017-11-22)

Dissatisfaction in three dimensions
In a paper published in the Clothing and Textiles Research Journal, Jessica Ridgway, an assistant professor of retail entrepreneurship in the Jim Moran School of Entrepreneurship, asserts that mood and body satisfaction can take major hits after viewing oneself represented as a 3-D avatar. (2018-02-05)

The 'loudness' of our thoughts affects how we judge external sounds
The 'loudness' of our thoughts -- or how we imagine saying something -- influences how we judge the loudness of real, external sounds, a team of researchers from NYU Shanghai and NYU has found. (2018-02-23)

Lesson learned? Massive study finds lectures still dominate STEM ed
An analysis of more than 2,000 college classes in science, technology, engineering and math has found that 55 percent of STEM classroom interactions consisted mostly of conventional lecturing -- a style that prior research has identified as among the least effective at teaching and engaging students. (2018-03-29)

The trouble with hybrids
Hybrid electric vehicles are no more than a stop-gap until more sustainable technology is developed, according to a report published recently in the Inderscience publication International Journal of Automotive Technology and Management. (2008-02-07)

Genes contribute to biological motion perception and its covariation with autistic traits
Dr. JIANG Yi, Dr. WANG Ying and their colleagues from the State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Psychology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have conducted a behavioral genetic study to find out the sources underlying the individual differences in biological motion perception. (2018-01-22)

Virtual reality users must learn to use what they see
A UW-Madison study found that when most people put on a virtual reality headset, they still treat what they see like it's happening on any run-of-the-mill TV screen. (2017-12-04)

Study explores how emotions in facial expressions are understood
New research by academics at the University of East Anglia (UEA) reveals how well fearful facial expressions are perceived in peripheral vision. Although human vision has the highest resolution when we look directly at something, we see a much wider view of the visual world in our lower resolution peripheral vision. In fact, detecting signals of potential danger in our periphery - especially moving ones - is something our visual system is well adapted for. (2018-06-01)

Whether a fashion model or not, some body image concerns are universal
When researchers from UCLA and the Laureate Institute for Brain Research in Tulsa, Oklahoma, wanted to test an app they created to measure body image perception, they went to the body image experts -- fashion models. (2019-10-29)

The brain's imperfect execution of mathematically optimal perception
Human perception is based on mathematically optimal principles, but the brain implements those principles imperfectly, suggests new research by Elina Stengård and Ronald van den Berg of the University of Uppsala, Sweden. They present their findings in PLOS Computational Biology. (2019-04-18)

It's all relative: How our brains overstate the prevalence and intensity of threats
In a series of experiments, David Levari et al. reveal how people are deceived by their own perceptions, where threatening or harmful stimuli are perceived as remaining abundant even when they are, in fact, decreasing in prevalence. (2018-06-28)

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