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Popular Perception News and Current Events, Perception News Articles.
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Stimuli fading away en route to consciousness
Whether or not we consciously perceive the stimuli projected onto our retina is decided in our brain. A recent study by the University of Bonn shows how some signals dissipate along the processing path to conscious perception. This process begins at rather late stages of signal processing. By contrast, in earlier stages there is hardly any difference in the reaction of neurons to conscious and unconscious stimuli. The paper is published in Current Biology. (2017-09-22)

A fish of all flavors
Japanese researchers achieve atomic resolution images of taste receptors in fish. The structure explains why so few receptors are sufficient to sense a nearly limitless variety of sweet and savory flavors. Because these receptors are shared across vertebrate species, including humans, the findings are expected to provide new insights on how humans ascertain different tastes. (2017-06-08)

Approaching the perception of touch in the brain
More than ten percent of the cerebral cortex are involved in processing information about our sense of touch -- a larger area than previously thought. This is the result of a joint study by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig and Ruhr Universität Bochum. (2019-11-25)

Close relations exhibit greater agreement on the attractiveness of faces
Researchers at Harvard University have shown that spouses, siblings and close friends are more likely to have similar preferences with regard to the attractiveness of faces. (2007-12-12)

Drivers don't ignore a ringing phone but do ignore the risk
Drivers find it difficult to ignore a ringing phone but do ignore the dangers, with a new QUT study revealing almost 50 percent believe locating and answering a ringing phone is not as risky as talking and texting. Research by QUT's Centre for Accident Research & Road Safety -- Queensland has found locating a ringing phone, checking who's calling, and rejecting or answering the call, is the most frequent mobile phone task undertaken by drivers. (2017-09-07)

Children gain more weight when parents see them as 'overweight'
Children whose parents considered them to be 'overweight' tended to gain more weight over the following decade compared with children whose parents thought they were a 'normal' weight, according to analyses of data from two nationally representative studies. The findings indicate that children whose parents identified them as being overweight perceived their own body size more negatively and were more likely to attempt to lose weight, factors that partly accounted for their weight gain. (2017-01-13)

Using endangered barbary macaques as photo props could negatively impact Moroccan tourism
Wild animals are increasingly exploited for entertainment and photo opportunities. A new study highlights that tourists in Morocco object to the use of barbary macaques as photo props, raising concerns about the animal's welfare and risk to human health. The findings are presented today at the British Ecological Society annual conference in Birmingham. (2018-12-18)

Determinant factors for energy consumption and perception of energy conservation clarified
Change in lifestyle is a key component to realizing a low-carbon society. A research group at Osaka University examined determinant factors associated with the residential consumption and perception of savings of electricity and gas based on data collected from a large-scale survey in Suita City, Osaka, Japan, in two different years: 2009 and 2013, and 'household income,' 'actual amount of energy consumption,' and 'perception of energy savings' were identified as three closely related elements. (2015-12-02)

Species in the north are more vulnerable to climate change
For the first time, researchers have proposed the hypothesis that animals that live in climate zones at a safe distance from both the poles as well as the tropics have the most to gain from acclimating to changes in climate. The findings contradict previous research in the field. (2017-11-16)

Self-perception and reality seem to line-up when it comes to judging our own personality
When it comes to personality, it turns out your peers probably think the same way about you as you do about yourself (2018-12-14)

Exploring gender perception via speech
Snap judgments of speakers' femininity or masculinity are based on acoustic information from the speakers' voices, but some vocal qualities deemed 'feminine' can overlap with acoustic cues for 'clear speech,' which is a set of changes speakers make when they suspect their listener is having difficulty hearing. This overlap inspired researchers to explore gender perception via speech -- largely to determine whether adopting clear speech could help transgender people who would like to sound more feminine. (2016-05-25)

Study suggests that fear and anger had different effects on conservatives and liberals
The emotional underpinnings of political ideology motivated how the electorate sought and processed information about the 2016 presidential election and the major issue of climate change. ''This has important implications for how political dialogue is shaped,'' said Janet Yang, an expert in the communication of risk information related to science, health and the environment. ''It's not just what the candidates are saying; it's also how we communicate with one another.'' (2019-01-09)

Tics are common in famous boys choir
'Tis the season for choirs to raise their voices in holiday song. (2017-12-20)

Researchers explore psychological effects of climate change
While some people have little anxiety about the Earth's changing climate, others are experiencing high levels of stress, and even depression, based on their perception of the threat of global climate change, researchers found. Psychological responses to climate change seem to vary based on what type of concern people show for the environment, with those highly concerned about the planet's animals and plants experiencing the most stress. (2018-01-17)

Münster researchers identify factors promoting physical activity in childhood
Researchers at Münster University (Germany) show in a study published in the 'Scientific Reports' journal that the more accurately children assess their motor competences, the more positive is the effect on their physical activity. (2018-04-24)

Can pursuing happiness make you unhappy?
Researchers have found that people who pursue happiness often feel like they do not have enough time in the day, and this paradoxically makes them feel unhappy. Aekyoung Kim of Rutgers University in the US and Sam Maglio of the University of Toronto Scarborough in Canada have investigated this effect in a study in the journal Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, which is published by Springer and is an official journal of the Psychonomic Society. (2018-03-12)

The invisible world of human perception
Perception experts have long known that we see less of the world than we think we do. We create mental models of our surroundings by stitching together scraps of information gleaned while shifting attention from place to place. The process that creates the illusion of a complete picture relies on filtering out most of what's out there. Now, University of Toronto researchers find people have more control over what gets filtered out than previously believed. (2016-03-21)

Investigational cream may help patients with inflammatory skin disease
A study published in the British Journal of Dermatology indicates that an investigational nonsteroidal topical cream (PAC-14028) may be effective for treating atopic dermatitis, one of the most common inflammatory skin diseases. (2019-01-09)

More stroke awareness, better eating habits may help reduce stroke risk for young adult African-Americans
Young African-Americans are experiencing higher rates of stroke because of health conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity, yet their perception of their stroke risk is low. Increased education and better eating habits are important to help reduce stroke risk in young adults. (2020-02-12)

Engineers build a soft robotics perception system inspired by humans
An international team of researchers has developed a perception system for soft robots inspired by the way humans process information about their own bodies in space and in relation to other objects and people. They describe the system, which includes a motion capture system, soft sensors, a neural network, and a soft robotic finger, in the Jan. 30 issue of Science Robotics. (2019-01-30)

LSD alters perception via serotonin receptors
Researchers from UZH have discovered how the perception of meaning changes in the brain under the influence of LSD. The serotonin 2A receptors are responsible for altered perception. This finding will help develop new courses of pharmacotherapy for psychiatric disorders such as depression, addictions or phobias. (2017-01-26)

Neuroscience research provides evidence the brain is strobing not constant
It's not just our eyes that play tricks on us, but our ears. That's the finding of a landmark Australian-Italian collaboration that provides new evidence that oscillations, or 'strobes', are a general feature of human perception. While our conscious experience appears to be continuous, the University of Sydney and Italian universities study suggests that perception and attention are intrinsically rhythmic in nature. (2017-11-16)

The cause of all hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II cases has been established
A major discovery that details the existence of a neuronal specific form of the WNK1 gene, henceforth referred to as the WNK1/HSN2 isoform, was recently completed by the research group of Dr. Guy A. Rouleau and published in the scientific journal the Journal of Clinical Investigation. (2008-06-10)

Popular psychology theories on self-esteem not backed up by serious research
Low self-esteem is associated with a greater risk of mental health problems such as eating disorders and depression. From a public health perspective, it is important for staff in various health-related professions to know about self-esteem. However, there is a vast difference between the research-based knowledge on self-esteem and the simplified popular psychology theories that are disseminated through books and motivational talks, reveals research from the University of Gothenburg. (2011-02-28)

Screen children with reading difficulties for hearing problems, says report
The study found 25 percent of its young participants who had reading difficulties showed mild or moderate hearing impairment, of which their parents and teachers were unaware. (2017-10-05)

Researchers advise the use of anaesthesia in foetuses from 21 weeks of gestation
From the second trimester of pregnancy, the future baby already shows signs of pain when given a harmful stimulus or as a response to stress. In response to this confirmation, the researchers indicate the need to anaesthetise the foetus during open foetal surgery, OFS. (2018-03-16)

The mathematics of music history
New research from Center for Music in the Brain shows that patriotism in music is expressed through use of speech rhythms from the composer's native language. (2016-10-06)

More of the Chinese population will be exposed to heat waves
One of the major concerns in climate change studies is how the thermal conditions for the living environment of human beings will change in the future. Scientists found that a general increase in effective temperature in the future leads to a large increase in population exposure to very hot days. (2018-06-12)

Collecting the right quantity of evidence: How the brain makes a difficult decision
New research conducted in the Cognitive Neuroscience group of SISSA shows that a perceptual decision - recognizing an object and taking the appropriate action - is triggered as soon as the brain's processing networks accumulate the exact right quantity of sensory information. The studies uncover fundamental brain mechanisms underlying decision making in an uncertain world. (2019-04-19)

Conflict management improves ICU team knowledge, mindfulness and awareness
The intensive care unit is a stressful place, and conflicts invariably arise. To better understand the relationships between physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists and advanced practitioners, researchers created a conflict management education intervention. The study paid close attention to diagnosing the conflict type and cause, recognizing the internal dialogue, introducing conflict management modes used in conflict situations and developing self and other awareness. (2018-10-04)

Video game players frequently exposed to graphic content may see world differently
Disturbing imagery disrupts perception, but not as much among violent video game players, UNSW Sydney psychologists have shown. (2018-12-13)

Surrounded by low achievers -- High on positive emotions?
Study involving the University of Konstanz proves negative impacts of high-achieving environment on school students' individual emotional well-being. (2019-02-11)

CCNY physicists use mathematics to trace neuro transitions
Unique in its application of a mathematical model to understand how the brain transitions from consciousness to unconscious behavior, a study at The City College of New York's Benjamin Levich Institute for Physico-Chemical Hydrodynamics may have just advanced neuroscience appreciably. The findings, surprisingly by physicists, suggest that the subliminal state is the most robust part of the conscious network and appear on the cover of the journal 'Neuroscience.' (2019-07-18)

Study: LGBTQ+ individuals at high risk to be victims of violence
Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people are at high risk for being victims of physical and sexual assault, harassment, bullying, and hate crimes, according to a new study by RTI International. (2017-03-09)

Do we subconsciously judge face-likeness?
The research team of the Visual Perception and Cognition Laboratory at the Toyohashi University of Technology has suggested that face-likeness is judged by early visual processing at around 100ms after viewing an object. The present study focused on the relation between face-likeness recognition and brain activity to suggest for the first time that face-likeness recognition is influenced by early visual processing. The results of the present study were published in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. (2018-05-11)

What do the red 'ornaments' of female macaques mean?
Scientists demonstrated that, contrary to what had been assumed for several years, colour variations among female macaques do not precisely indicate the time of ovulation. On the other hand, dominant female macaques, who usually have greater reproductive success, have darker hindquarters. (2019-07-19)

Microplastics in food -- Many unanswered questions among scientists and the general public
Although overall 75 percent of the population regard food as safe, more and more Germans are showing concern about microplastics in food. As the latest BfR Consumer Monitor -- a regular population survey conducted by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) -- shows, the topic is better known and more people are concerned about it than they were six months ago. (2018-10-31)

Hearing with your eyes -- a Western style of speech perception
Which parts of a person's face do you look at when you listen them speak? Lip movements affect the perception of voice information from the ears when listening to someone speak, but native Japanese speakers are mostly unaffected by that part of the face. Recent research from Japan has revealed a clear difference in the brain network activation between two groups of people, native English speakers and native Japanese speakers, during face-to-face vocal communication. (2016-11-14)

Research finds fair classroom practices disarm threat of evaluation retaliation
While tuition inflation presents a challenge for many college-bound students, an area of growing concern for many universities is 'grade inflation' -- in part caused when instructors grade more leniently to discourage students from retaliating by giving low teaching evaluations. Washington State University researchers say instructors can stop worrying about evaluation revenge as long as they use practices in the classroom that students perceive as fair. (2018-06-13)

How the olfactory brain affects memory
How sensory perception in the brain affects learning and memory processes is far from fully understood. Two neuroscientists of Ruhr-Universität Bochum have discovered a new aspect of how the processing of odours impacts memory centres. They showed that the piriform cortex -- a part of the olfactory brain -- has a direct influence on information storage in our most important memory structure, the hippocampus. (2019-04-29)

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