Popular Peripheral Neuropathy News and Current Events

Popular Peripheral Neuropathy News and Current Events, Peripheral Neuropathy News Articles.
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Healthy lifestyle smartphone app slows artery aging
Using a healthy lifestyle smartphone application helps to slow artery ageing, according to results from the EVIDENT II trial presented today at EuroHeartCare 2018, the European Society of Cardiology's annual nursing congress. (2018-06-09)

New test may quickly identify mild traumatic brain injury with underlying brain damage
A new test using peripheral vision reaction time could lead to earlier diagnosis and more effective treatment of mild traumatic brain injury, often referred to as a concussion. (2017-02-16)

Defective sheath
Schwann cells form a protective sheath around nerve fibres and ensure that nerve impulses are transmitted rapidly. If these cells are missing or damaged, severe neurological diseases may occur as a result. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have succeeded in demonstrating a complex interaction within Schwann cells which plays an important role for correct cell maturation. (2019-08-27)

Drug combination may provide option to patients with NSCLC ineligible for bevacizumab
Nab-paclitaxel and carboplatin yielded a 41 percent response rate. Toxicity of the combination is (2012-04-03)

High levels of estrogen in lung tissue related to lung cancer in postmenopausal women
Researchers from Kumamoto University, Japan have found that postmenopausal women with multicentric adenocarcinoma of the lung have a higher concentration of estrogen in non-cancerous areas of the peripheral lung than similar women diagnosed with single tumor lung cancer. The research is an extension of their previous investigation into a gene mutation found to be related to an increased risk of multicentric lung cancer. (2016-10-25)

Alectinib provides longer symptom improvement than crizotinib in ALK-positive lung cancer
The findings of the ALEX trial presented at the ELCC (European Lung Cancer Congress) 2018 in Geneva, Switzerland, support the use of alectinib as the new standard of care in the frontline treatment of ALK-positive lung cancer. Alectinib was found to provide longer symptom improvement than crizotinib in ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer. (2018-04-12)

Follow-up cholesterol testing reduces risk of reocurrence for heart attack and stroke patients
If you have a heart attack or stroke, it's important to get your 'bad' cholesterol measured by your doctor on a follow up visit. Researchers have found that one step is significantly associated with a reduced risk of suffering another serious cardiovascular episode. (2017-11-12)

Tumor-targeting viral therapy slows neuroblastoma, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors
Researchers in a multi-institutional study led by Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center slowed the growth of two particularly stubborn solid tumor cancers -- neuroblastoma and peripheral nerve sheath tumors -- without harming healthy tissues by inserting instructions to inhibit tissue growth into an engineered virus, according to study results published in the Feb. 15 Cancer Research. (2008-02-15)

Unexpected helpers in wound healing
Nerve cells in the skin help wounds to heal. When an injury occurs, cells known as glial cells change into repair cells and disseminate into the wound, where they help the skin to regenerate, researchers from the University of Zurich have shown. (2018-01-24)

Blood vessels also affected by Alzheimer's disease
A research conducted by the UAB demonstrates that mice suffering from this disease also have substantial malfunctions in small blood vessels, important in nourishing different organs and tissues and in regulating blood pressure, and which mainly affects females. The study also demonstrates a correlation between the state of peripheral blood vessels and different levels of anxious behaviour, both in normal ageing and in those suffering from Alzheimer's disease. (2018-03-16)

Multimodal intervention can reduce PIVC insertion in the emergency department
Peripheral intravenous cannula (PIVC) insertion in the emergency department can be reduced using a multimodal approach designed to support critical thinking and promote clinically appropriate peripheral intravenous cannula insertion and use. (2017-12-27)

Opioids produce analgesia via immune cells
Opioids are the most powerful painkillers. Researchers at the Charité -- Universitätsmedizin Berlin have now found that the analgesic effects of opioids are not exclusively mediated by opioid receptors in the brain, but can also be mediated via the activation of receptors in immune cells. Results from this research have been published in the journal Brain, Behavior, and Immunity. (2017-01-17)

Ludwig study extends potential for personalized immunotherapy to large variety of cancers
A Ludwig Cancer Research study shows that ovarian cancer, which has proved resistant to currently available immunotherapies, could be susceptible to personalized immunotherapy. (2018-03-15)

Children with neuroblastoma have an elevated risk of long-term psychological difficulties
A new study reveals that pediatric neuroblastoma patients are at elevated risk for long-term psychological impairment. In addition, those who experience such impairment as they get older tend to require special education services and to not go on to college. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. (2018-06-11)

Multiple sclerosis drug could reduce painful side effects of common cancer treatment
Researchers from the Saint Louis University School of Medicine have discovered why many multiple myeloma patients experience severe pain when treated with the anticancer drug bortezomib. The study, which will be published April 27 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that a drug already approved to treat multiple sclerosis could mitigate this effect, allowing myeloma patients to successfully complete their treatment and relieving the pain of myeloma survivors. (2018-04-27)

ESC Guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral arterial diseases published today
European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Peripheral Arterial Diseases, developed in collaboration with the European Society for Vascular Surgery (ESVS), are published online today in European Heart Journal,1 European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, and the ESC website. (2017-08-26)

Regenerating blood vessels gets $2.7 million grant
Biomedical engineers in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin have received $2.7 million in funding to advance a treatment that regenerates blood vessels. (2016-04-26)

Physical activity prepares neurons to regenerate in case of spinal cord injury
The influence of an active lifestyle on the regenerative capacity of the peripheral nervous system, that is, the set of cranial and spinal nerves that control motor and sensory functions, is described here for the first time, explains Ángel Barco, who has led the participation of the Institute of Neurosciences UMH-CSIC, in Alicante, in this international study. (2019-04-10)

From vascular medicine: Focus on vascular imaging and diagnostics
Vascular disease is a leading cause of morbidity and death worldwide. In order to combat the disease, specialists must have skills with imaging techniques. With this in mind, Vascular Medicine, the official journal of the Society for Vascular Medicine, dedicated its April 2018 issue to the topic of vascular imaging and diagnostics. (2018-04-10)

Peripheral nerve block provides some with long-lasting pain relief for severe facial pain
A new study has shown that use of peripheral nerve blocks in the treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia (TGN) may produce long-term pain relief. (2018-08-13)

Genes that aid spinal cord healing in lamprey also present in humans, MBL team discovers
Many of the genes involved in natural repair of the injured spinal cord of the lamprey are also active in the repair of the peripheral nervous system in mammals, according to a study by a collaborative group of scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) and other institutions. (2018-01-15)

'Pain paradox' discovery provides route to new pain control drugs
A natural substance known to activate pain in the central nervous system has been found to have the opposite effect in other parts of the body, potentially paving the way to new methods of pain control. (2016-07-28)

Study explores how emotions in facial expressions are understood
New research by academics at the University of East Anglia (UEA) reveals how well fearful facial expressions are perceived in peripheral vision. Although human vision has the highest resolution when we look directly at something, we see a much wider view of the visual world in our lower resolution peripheral vision. In fact, detecting signals of potential danger in our periphery - especially moving ones - is something our visual system is well adapted for. (2018-06-01)

TSRI scientists zero in on treatment for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have now shown a path to developing treatments for disease subtype CMT2D. (2018-03-08)

Prism glasses expand the view for patients with hemianopia
Innovative prism glasses can significantly improve the vision and the daily lives of patients with hemianopia, a condition that blinds half the visual field in both eyes. The peripheral prism glasses, which were invented by Dr. Eli Peli, a senior scientist at Schepens Eye Research Institute. (2008-05-12)

Understanding the causes of neurological abnormalities that result from premature birth
New research shows motor abnormalities frequently associated with low birth weight babies could originate due to peripheral nerve defects. (2017-01-03)

Berkeley engineers build smallest volume, most efficient wireless nerve stimulator
Berkeley engineers have taken their neural dust invention a step forward by building the smallest volume, most efficient wireless nerve stimulator to date. (2018-04-10)

Origin of cells for connective tissues of skull and face challenged
With improved resolution, tissue-specific molecular markers and precise timing, University of Oregon biologist James A. Weston and colleagues have possibly overturned a long-standing assumption about the origin of embryonic cells that give rise to connective and skeletal tissues that form the base of the skull and facial structures in back-boned creatures from fish to humans. (2008-05-23)

Medicinal marijuana effective for neuropathic pain in HIV
In a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial to assess the impact of smoked medical cannabis, or marijuana, on the neuropathic pain associated with HIV, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine found that reported pain relief was greater with cannabis than with a placebo. (2008-08-06)

HIV-1 kills immune cells in the gut that may never bounce back
Two new studies from Rockefeller University and the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center (ADARC) show that the immune cells in other body tissues may never rebound after HIV infection, suggesting the need for additional ways to monitor immune system health, and the need for hypervigilance as HIV-positive patients live into their forties, fifties, sixties and beyond. (2006-12-04)

Nerve growth factor: Early studies and recent clinical trials
NGF is the first discovered member of a family of neurotrophic factors, collectively indicated as neurotrophins, (which include brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neurotrophin-3 and neurotrophin 4/5). NGF was discovered for its action on the survival and differentiation of selected populations of peripheral neurons. (2019-01-18)

An innovative PET tracer can measure damage from multiple sclerosis in mouse models
In the Jan. 12, 2018, Scientific Reports, a research team describes early tests of a minimally-invasive way to assess myelin damage -- the hallmark of multiple sclerosis -- using positron emission tomography (PET). This approach could be used to follow MS lesions over time. (2018-01-12)

Novel therapy delays muscle atrophy in Lou Gehrig's disease model
Supplementing a single protein found in the spinal cord could help prevent symptoms of Lou Gehrig's disease, according to a new study out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Researchers found high levels of the protein -- called mitofusion 2 or Mfn2 -- prevented nerve degeneration, muscle atrophy, and paralysis in a mouse model of the disease. Since Mfn2 is often depleted during Lou Gehrig's, the new study suggests supplementing it could be a novel therapeutic approach for the disease. (2018-07-12)

Humans risked limb ischemia in exchange for bipedal walking
The micro X-ray CT was established through joint engineering and medical research, and allows for the visualization of tiny structures in three dimensions. By examining the blood vessels of mice in detail via micro CT, researchers compared the vessels in mice to those in humans and identified characteristic mouse blood vessels that provide a circulation bypass when the femoral artery becomes clogged. (2018-03-27)

Alzheimer peripheral blood: mRNA expression of amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in elderly populations. Changes in the expression of the amyloid precursor protein (APP)-cleaving enzymes directly affect the formation of amyloid beta (Aβ) plaques, a neuropathological hallmark of AD.BACE1 mRNA level in AD subjects was significantly higher than those of healthy controls, whereas ADAM10 level was significantly lower in the AD subjects. (2018-12-14)

Enzyme ensures thick insulation
ETH researchers have revealed that Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system largely produce their own fatty acids in order to create electrical insulation for nerve fibres. This process relies on an enzyme whose absence leads to defective insulation and impaired motor function. (2018-03-08)

Nerve study shows how cells adapt to help repair damage
Genetic processes that allow cells to transform so they can mend damaged nerves have been identified by scientists. (2017-10-05)

Sign language users have better reaction times and peripheral vision
People who use British Sign Language have better reaction times in their peripheral vision, a new study from the University of Sheffield has found. (2017-02-06)

Researchers find combination therapy works best for heart diseases
A major international study has found that the combination of two drugs -- rivaroxaban and aspirin -- is superior to aspirin alone in preventing further heart complications in people with vascular disease. The study of 27,400 people with stable coronary or peripheral artery disease from 33 countries worldwide shows that the combination of 2.5 mg of rivaroxaban twice daily plus 100 mg of aspirin once daily was significantly better than only aspirin or only rivaroxaban in preventing heart attacks, strokes and death. (2017-08-27)

High blood pressure reasons differ by gender in teens; young adults
Gender matters when it comes to what's most likely to elevate blood pressure in young to middle-aged adults. The volume of blood pumped from the left ventricle during heartbeats, i.e., stroke volume, is the main determinant of blood pressure levels in women, while blood pressure in men is more likely to be determined by the amount of resistance in the body's blood vessels. (2017-09-15)

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