Popular Peripheral Neuropathy News and Current Events | Page 3

Popular Peripheral Neuropathy News and Current Events, Peripheral Neuropathy News Articles.
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Poor diet can lead to blindness
An extreme case of 'fussy' or 'picky' eating caused a young patient's blindness, according to a new case report published today [2 Sep 2019] in Annals of Internal Medicine. The University of Bristol researchers who examined the case recommend clinicians consider nutritional optic neuropathy in any patients with unexplained vision symptoms and poor diet, regardless of BMI, to avoid permanent vision loss. (2019-09-02)

Dual energy computed tomography angiography in the peripheral arterial imaging
This is a systematic review of 9 studies on the diagnostic applications of dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) in peripheral arterial disease. The systematic analysis of these studies represent the first summary of studies using DECT with regard to its diagnostic value, radiation dose and contrast medium dose. (2017-01-26)

MDI Biological Laboratory discovery could lead to new therapies for diabetics
New research by MDI Biological Laboratory scientist Sandra Rieger, Ph.D., has demonstrated that an enzyme she had previously identified as playing a role in peripheral neuropathy induced by cancer chemotherapy also plays a role in peripheral neuropathy caused by diabetes. The significance of the identification of a common molecular mechanism is that the drug candidates she identified to treat chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy could potentially be used to treat peripheral neuropathy caused by diabetes as well. (2018-01-11)

Diagnosing, treating neuropathy symptoms in cancer patients not exact science
Most of the roughly 15.5 million cancer survivors in the US receive chemotherapy, and roughly 65 percent develop some degree of the chemotherapy-induced nerve damage known as peripheral neuropathy. (2018-04-17)

Interacting with more people is shown to keep older adults more active
Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have found that older adults who spend more time interacting with a wide range of people were more likely to be physically active and had greater emotional well-being. (2019-02-20)

Scanning the lens of the eye could predict type 2 diabetes and prediabetes
New research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Barcelona, Spain, (Sept. 16-20) shows that specialist analysis of the lens in the eye can predict patients with type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) (also known as prediabetes, a condition that often leads to full blown of type 2 diabetes). (2019-09-15)

Biofeedback relaxation app may help kids during medical procedures
A new Pain Practice study indicates that biofeedback-assisted relaxation may help manage pain and anxiety in children undergoing medical procedures. (2018-04-19)

Thwack! Insects feel chronic pain after injury
Scientists have known insects experience something like pain since 2003, but new research published today from Associate Professor Greg Neely and colleagues at the University of Sydney proves for the first time that insects also experience chronic pain that lasts long after an initial injury has healed. (2019-07-12)

Glia and axons: A match made in evolution
The evolutionary prerequisites of myelin -- the fatty substance that insulates axons and enables rapid communication between cells of the nervous system in jawed vertebrates -- are described in new research in fish published in JNeurosci. (2018-06-25)

MicroRNA may help control arterial thrombosis
In a new study published online this week in The FASEB Journal, a Brigham and Women's Hospital research team investigated the role of miR-181b in blocking the development of arterial thrombosis. The new findings have implications for heart attacks, stroke and peripheral artery disease. (2016-06-14)

How circadian clocks communicate with each other
Multiple biological clocks control the daily rhythms of physiology and behavior in animals and humans. Whether and how these clocks are connected with each other is still a largely open question. A new study now shows that a central clock governs the circadian rhythms in certain cases. (2017-05-30)

Navigating navigating land and water
Centipedes not only walk on land but also swim in water. Researchers at Tohoku University, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, University of Ottawa, and Hokkaido University with the support of the Human Frontier Science Program have, for the first time, decoded the flexible motor control mechanism underlying amphibious locomotion, or the ability to walk on land and to swim in water, in centipedes. (2019-12-09)

New advances in the fight against cancer
Research into cancer can provide new insight into how this disease works and how it can be stopped. The Experimental Biology 2018 meeting (EB 2018) will showcase innovative research that could lead to new ways to treat and prevent cancer. (2018-04-21)

Among body shapes, pears are healthier than apples
For women, fat usually accumulates around the hips, resulting in a pear-shaped look. In men, fat tends to build up around the abdomen, creating an apple shape. As it turns out, it's healthier to be a pear than an apple. A UC Riverside research team has found that only male mice experienced neuroinflammation after being fed a high-fat diet. While females were unaffected, males showed low testosterone and reduced sperm count, in addition to neuroinflammation. (2018-09-12)

New study analyzes cost effectiveness of smoked cannabis to treat chronic neuropathic pain
Smoked cannabis as an adjunctive second-line therapy to treat chronic peripheral neuropathy can be both effective and cost-effective. (2019-01-29)

Researchers investigate correlation between blood flow and body position
For the first time ever, an international research group detected alterations in capillary blood flow around the face caused by body position change. This became possible through the use of imaging photoplethysmography. Using this method, scientists can examine blood vessels located in the carotid system in order to, for example, investigate the cerebral blood flow response to various stimuli in health and disease. The results of the research were published in Scientific Reports. (2018-09-18)

Visualization strategies may backfire on consumers pursuing health goals
Using visualization as motivation is a common technique for achieving goals, but consumers who are pursuing health goals such as eating healthy or losing weight should use caution when using perspective-based visualizations. (2019-04-04)

Nearly 25 percent of chronic ischemic heart disease patients dead or hospitalized in 6 months
Nearly a quarter of patients with chronic ischemic cardiovascular disease are dead or hospitalized within six months, reports a European Society of Cardiology study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. (2018-01-17)

Researchers find novel mutation affecting YARS causes multisystem disease
Researchers have identified a novel missense mutation in tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (YARS c.499C>A, p.Pro167Thr) that causes a severe recessive disorder in affected individuals. The report includes detailed clinical characterization of seven related Amish children who were homozygous for the variant. The children all exhibited poor growth, developmental delay, abnormal brain white matter, hearing loss, involuntary eye movements, progressive cholestatic liver disease, pancreatic insufficiency, hypoglycemia, anemia, intermittent excess of protein in urine, recurrent bloodstream infections, and chronic pulmonary disease. (2018-11-06)

It takes a lot of nerve: Scientists make cells to aid peripheral nerve repair
Peripheral nerve injuries, such as those resulting from neuropathies, physical trauma or surgery, are common and can cause partial or complete loss of nerve function and a reduced quality of life. Now, researchers are able to produce large quantities of specialized cells known as Schwann cells that could be used to help treat such injuries. This strategy offers great potential in cell-based therapies for peripheral nerve injuries, including spinal cord injuries. (2015-08-06)

Eating more fruits and vegetables may lower risk of blockages in leg arteries
Eating three or more servings of fruit and vegetables per day may lower your risk of developing blockages in leg arteries. (2017-05-18)

Diabetes-associated pain linked to disrupted insulin signalling
Chronic pain hypersensitivity is commonly experienced by individuals with diabetes, and is difficult to treat. The origin of this pain was previously assumed to be damaged blood vessels or the effect of high blood sugar on tissue surrounding neurons. Now, new research in fruit flies indicates that the pain results instead from disrupted insulin signalling in pain sensory neurons, and demonstrates reversal of pain hypersensitivity when insulin signalling is restored. (2018-05-10)

Second cause of hidden hearing loss identified
Some people can pass a hearing test but have trouble understanding speech in a noisy environment. New research identifies a new mechanism for this condition just years after its discovery. (2017-02-17)

New 'smart drug' shows promise for metastatic triple-negative breast cancer
A clinical trial at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia and other centers found that patients responded to a new 'smart drug' for women with an aggressive form of breast cancer. (2019-02-20)

First human clinical trial for nicotinamide riboside
In the first controlled clinical trial of nicotinamide riboside (NR), a newly discovered form of vitamin B3, researchers have shown that the compound is safe for humans and increases levels of a cell metabolite that is critical for cellular energy production and protection against stress and DNA damage. (2016-10-10)

Synthetic carbohydrates against autoimmune diseases
Researchers are developing an innovative approach for the treatment of a rare autoimmune disease of the peripheral nervous system, using a type of molecular sponge consisting of carbohydrates to remove pathogenic antibodies from the bloodstream. Developed to treat anti-MAG neuropathy, the approach also has potential applications for the treatment of other autoimmune diseases. Scientists from the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel have reported their findings in the scientific journal PNAS. (2017-04-17)

Chronic ill-health and the chances of surviving a heart attack
New research has identified the devastating impact of pre-existing health problems on recovery from a heart attack. (2018-03-06)

Pilates provides a range of benefits for patients with chronic musculoskeletal conditions
A Musculoskeletal Care study is the first to investigate individual perceptions of the impact of a Pilates exercise program on the daily lives of people with chronic conditions. (2018-11-07)

Eye's vulnerability to macular degeneration revealed
Scientists have found significant differences in the shape and biology of the same type of cell taken from different parts of the retina, according to a study in eLife. (2019-05-07)

New approach to spinal cord and brain injury research
Many an injury will heal, but the damaged spinal cord is notoriously recalcitrant. There's new hope on the horizon, though. A team of researchers led by the University of South Carolina's Jeff Twiss just reported an innate repair mechanism in central nervous system axons that might be harnessed to regenerate nerves after brain or spinal cord injuries. (2015-07-14)

Weight loss surgery improves microvascular complications in obese diabetic patients
In a BJS (British Journal of Surgery) analysis of published studies in obese patients with type 2 diabetes, researchers found that weight loss surgery helps prevent the development of microvascular complications--which affect small blood vessels--better than medical treatment. The analysis was conducted by investigators from the Surgical Department of the University of Heidelberg in cooperation with the Study Center of the German Surgical Society. (2018-02-05)

Near misses at Large Hadron Collider shed light on the onset of gluon-dominated protons
New findings from University of Kansas researchers center on work at the Large Hadron Collider to better understand the behavior of gluons. (2019-09-10)

Drug does not reduce digital ulcers in patients with systemic sclerosis
In an article appearing in the May 10, 2016 issue of JAMA, Dinesh Khanna, M.D., of the University of Michigan Scleroderma Program, Ann Arbor, and colleagues evaluated the efficacy of the drug macitentan in reducing the number of new digital ulcers in patients with systemic sclerosis. (2016-05-10)

Cigarette smoking associated with increased risk of peripheral artery disease in African-Americans
African-Americans who smoke cigarettes are more likely than those who don't to have peripheral artery disease (PAD). Those who smoked more than 20 cigarettes a day significantly increased their likelihood of having PAD. PAD is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and can lead to stroke, erectile dysfunction and loss of limbs. (2019-01-23)

Endocrine Society experts examine how diabetes harms body's smallest blood vessels
The Endocrine Society issued a new Scientific Statement today examining how diabetes damages the body's smallest blood vessels as well as how the condition affects the body's natural repair processes designed to protect the eyes, kidneys, nerves and other organs. (2017-11-08)

Inflammatory bowel disease appears to impact risk of Parkinson's disease
Amsterdam, NL, November 14, 2019 - Relatively new research findings indicating that the earliest stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) may occur in the gut have been gaining traction in recent years. In a review published in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease, Tomasz Brudek, PhD, evaluates evidence for the association between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and PD and proposes directions for future research. (2019-11-14)

Study identifies specific gene network that promotes nervous system repair
Injured nerve cells in the limbs (the peripheral nervous system or PNS) can regrow and repair. Nerve cells in the central nervous system (CNS) -- brain and spinal cord --cannot. Now a network of genes has been identified in a mouse study that promotes PNS repair. In addition, an existing drug that mimics that gene network has been repurposed to promote nerve regeneration in the CNS. (2016-02-18)

New eye test could detect glaucoma years earlier
UNSW Australia scientists have developed a testing protocol that identifies the blinding eye disease glaucoma four years earlier than current techniques. (2016-07-12)

Hallucinations associated with brain hyperactivity in people with macular degeneration
New research from The University of Queensland has shown for the first time that visual hallucinations in people with macular degeneration are associated with abnormally heightened activity in the visual cortex of the brain. The findings, published in the journal Current Biology, could improve diagnosis of such hallucinations. (2018-10-25)

Research shows key function of specialized cells in peripheral nerve repair
New research led by the University of Plymouth has shed light on the science behind peripheral nerve repair, by highlighting the novel function of a large cell called a macrophage. (2019-02-05)

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