Popular Physicians News and Current Events

Popular Physicians News and Current Events, Physicians News Articles.
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Houston Methodist launches real-time flu tracker website
Pathologists at Houston Methodist developed a real-time website to track flu cases, just in time to assist physicians, the CDC and patients for the fall 2018 flu season. (2018-12-06)

Lots of patients with cancer, cancer survivors use but don't report complementary/alternative medicine therapies
This study used data from a nationwide survey to estimate how many patients with cancer and cancer survivors use complementary and alternative medicines (CAMS) in addition to or instead of conventional therapies, and how many don't disclose that to their physicians. (2019-04-11)

Malcolm Gladwell published in the Journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology
In his best sellers 'The Tipping Point,' 'Blink' and 'Outliers,' Malcolm Gladwell writes about the unexpected implications of scientific research, urging readers to think different. In an editorial published this month in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, Gladwell offers another example of his stock in trade: to make medical students better doctors, send them to art school. (2018-01-03)

New study uncovers major differences in billing complexity among US health insurers
One frequently proclaimed advantage of single-payer health care is its potential to reduce administrative costs, but new research from the Vancouver School of Economics calls that assumption into question. (2018-04-02)

Physicians' experiences with family and friends impact breast cancer screening
Results of a national survey of more than 800 physicians suggest that their experiences with patients, family members and friends with breast cancer are linked with their recommendations for routine mammograms. (2017-12-04)

Pediatric telemedicine services can work well under the right conditions
Doctors who provide pediatric care over the telephone -- known as 'telemedicine' -- face a range of challenges that do not come with traditional face-to-face contact. In a qualitative study led by Motti Haimi of Clalit Health Services at the Children's Health Center in Haifa in Israel, researchers found that physicians in a pediatric telemedicine service frequently face difficulties and challenges. (2018-08-06)

Online physician reviews don't reflect responses in patient satisfaction surveys
Physicians who receive negative reviews online do not receive similar responses in rigorous patient satisfaction surveys, according to new Mayo Clinic research in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2018-04-02)

Some primary care doctors not prepared to help with cancer treatment decisions
Research has shown patients are discussing initial cancer treatment options with their primary care doctors. And now a new study finds that a significant number of these physicians report notable gaps in their knowledge of cancer treatment options. (2019-02-12)

Study finds opportunity to increase opioid dependence treatment in Ontario jails
The study included completion of an online survey by 27 physicians, who reported working in 15 of 26 provincial correctional facilities for adults in Ontario. This included 10 of the 13 facilities with a population of more than 200. The study identified that about half of the physicians prescribed methadone and half prescribed buprenorphine/naloxone to treat opioid dependence. (2018-02-15)

Medscape's annual physician compensation report finds modest increase in physician pay
This is the 2018 Medscape Annual Physician Compensation Report, which surveys more than 20,000 US physicians across 29 specialties on questions such as quality of life, salary, and more. It has been used by more than 470,000 physicians in the US to assess information on compensation, hours worked, time spent with patients, and what they find most rewarding -- and challenging -- about their jobs (2018-04-11)

Obesity may influence rheumatoid arthritis blood tests
New research reveals that in women, obesity may influence blood tests used to diagnose and monitor rheumatoid arthritis. The findings, which appear in Arthritis Care & Research, indicate that physicians need to take obesity into account when using these tests. (2017-04-10)

Smartphones in the ER can help discharge patients faster
Chest pain patients in the emergency department whose attending emergency physicians received lab results delivered direct to their smartphones spent about 26 minutes less waiting to be discharged than patients whose lab results were delivered to the electronic patient record on the hospital computer system. The results of a randomized, controlled trial of a quality improvement initiative were published online Tuesday in Annals of Emergency Medicine. (2017-05-12)

Physicians, especially female and rural doctors, retiring earlier than expected
Physicians in British Columbia are retiring earlier than previously thought and many are reducing their working hours in the years leading up to retirement, found new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). These findings indicate that estimates based on physician 'head counts' from data on physician licences may be overestimating the number of active physicians. (2017-12-11)

Automated notification system improves follow-up of actionable tests pending at discharge
A new study by researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital demonstrates that the implementation of a simple automated notification system can improve tests pending at discharge (TPAD) follow-up. (2018-03-21)

Forgotten, but not gone: Leprosy still present in the US
Long believed to be a disease of biblical times, leprosy, also known as Hansen's disease, continues to be seen in the United States. (2008-11-07)

Physicians use complex process in addressing non-patient requests
When confronted with a medical request from family or friends (non-patients), physicians follow a complex process in deciding how to respond. According to a focus group study of 33 family medicine residents and 16 senior physicians, physicians first orient themselves to the situation: who is this person; what is he or she asking of me, and where are we? (2018-01-09)

Physicians' work should focus on personalized care, not transactional tasks
Shifting physicians' roles from transactional tasks to personalized care would best serve patients, physicians and society. (2018-03-13)

Time for physicians to prepare for impending appropriate use mandate
Within a year, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will implement a provision in the Protecting Access to Medicare Act that requires physicians to consult appropriate use criteria using CMS-approved computer-based clinical decision support mechanisms when ordering advanced imaging procedures. (2017-02-27)

Training trials
First national study shows cutting residents' training hours has not resulted in lower performance for new doctors. Resident training was capped at 80 hours per week in 2003, down from 100+ hours, a controversial move that left many worried. Despite worries, reduced hours did not change 30-day patient mortality, readmissions or spending. (2019-07-11)

Physicians and burnout: It's getting worse
Burnout among US physicians is getting worse. An update from a three-year study evaluating burnout and work-life balance shows that American physicians are worse off today than they were three years earlier. (2015-12-01)

How patients and healthcare providers communicate outside the office is changing
How do patients and physicians feel about email, cell phone and text interactions? A new study led by Joy L. Lee, PhD of the Regenstrief Institute compares these ways to communicate, concluding that the relationship the clinician has with a patient may have a greater impact on patient satisfaction than the technology used. (2018-01-09)

Mandate patient access to primary care medical records
Canada's provincial governments should mandate patient access to their electronic medical records, argue authors of a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2018-07-23)

Focus on treatment decisions: Doctor and patient should decide together
This edition of Deutsches Ă„rzteblatt International, which focuses on patient involvement, contains two original articles investigating the following questions: do patients benefit from shared decision making? Is treatment more effective as a result? How do physicians gain from training in shared decision making? (2015-10-23)

More doctors follow the money, more nurse practitioners follow the need
The rural physician shortage is well-established, and there's the notion that doctors don't necessarily establish their practices where need for health care is greatest -- in poor and unhealthy communities. (2018-02-27)

Early diagnosis can save babies' lives: A guide to severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID)
The review, published in CMAJ, is aimed at pediatricians, family physicians and other doctors who may treat newborns, including those who appear healthy at birth but begin to get severe, repeated infections requiring emergency department visits. (2017-12-18)

Avoiding medications that promote weight gain when managing obesity
While diet, exercise and behavior modification are essential components of obesity management, a successful long-term weight loss strategy should also include avoiding or minimizing medication-related weight gain, according to a new report from Weill Cornell Medicine. (2017-02-13)

Payments to doctors linked to prescription practices for two cancer types
Compared to physicians who didn't receive any payments, those who received general payments for meals and lodging from a drug manufacturer had higher odds of prescribing that company's particular drug for metastatic renal cell carcinoma and for chronic myeloid leukemia. (2018-04-09)

Do Democrat and Republican doctors treat patients differently at the end of life?
Despite deep rifts in health care opinions across party lines, a physician's party affiliation appears to have no effect on clinical decisions in end-of-life care. Researchers found no cross-party differences among physicians in their choice of care protocols, including the intensity of life-sustaining treatments, among terminally ill patients. (2018-04-11)

Showing empathy to patients can improve care
Showing clinical empathy to patients can improve their satisfaction of care, motivate them to stick to their treatment plans and lower malpractice complaints, found a study published in CMAJ. (2011-01-24)

Medscape report finds physicians are sexually harassed on the job
A new report from Medscape finds that more than one in 10 female physicians and 16 percent of female residents have experienced sexual harassment within the past three years. Overall, 7 percent of physicians (12 percent women, 4 percent men), and 9 percent of medical residents (16 percent women, 4 percent men) reported harassment. This is the first in a series of Medscape surveys examining this issue. (2018-06-13)

How can patients be protected from post-surgery opioid addiction?
Greater coordination is needed between surgeons and physicians about the prescription of pain-relieving opioid drugs following surgery to help identify patients who are at risk of becoming opioid addicts. This is according to Michael Klueh of the University of Michigan in the US who led a retrospective review of medical specialty areas to find out which are most likely to prescribe opioids for the first time to postoperative patients. (2018-06-12)

Types and distribution of payments from industry to physicians
In 2015, nearly half of physicians were reported to have received a total of $2.4 billion in industry-related payments, primarily involving general payments (including consulting fees and food and beverage), with a higher likelihood and value of payments to physicians in surgical than primary care specialties and to male than female physicians, according to a study published by JAMA in a theme issue on conflict of interest. (2017-05-02)

Uncovering the hidden roles management partners play in ACOs
In the first study of the role of management partners in ACOs, Dartmouth Institute researchers used data from the National Survey of Accountable Care Organizations to examine the prevalence of non-provider management partner involvement in ACOs, the services these partners provide, and the structure of ACOs that have such partners. They found 37% of ACOs had a management partner, and two-thirds of these ACOs reported that the partner shared in the financial risks or rewards. (2018-02-05)

Calif. survey finds physicians, pharmacists comply with prescription drug monitoring law
State law that funded upgrades and mandated registration for California's prescription drug monitoring program significantly increased registration rates, a UC Davis survey has found. (2017-11-29)

Less burnout seen among US physicians, Stanford researcher says
The epidemic levels of physicians reporting burnout dropped modestly in 2017, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine, the Mayo Clinic and the American Medical Association. (2019-02-22)

Does defensive medicine work?
In six out of seven specialties, higher-spending physicians faced fewer malpractice claims, accounting for differences in patient case-mix across physicians. For example, among internal medicine physicians, those in the bottom 20 percent of hospital spending faced a 1.5 percent probability of being involved in an alleged malpractice incident the following year, compared to 0.3 percent in the top spending quintile. (2015-11-04)

Physicians are more likely to use hospice and intensive care at end of life
New research suggests that US physicians are more likely to use hospice and intensive or critical care units in the last months of life than non-physicians. Hospitalization rates were similar. (2016-05-16)

ACP says patient safety must be improved in office-based practice setting
More needs to be done to improve patient safety in the outpatient setting, said the American College of Physicians (ACP) in a new policy paper released today. Patient Safety in the Office-Based Practice Setting offers a set of recommendations aimed at improving patient care in office-based practices. (2017-11-06)

How do minority resident physicians view the role of race/ethnicity in training experiences?
Workplace experiences of minority resident physicians in training are described in a new study. (2018-09-28)

Is higher health care spending by physicians associated with better outcomes?
Higher health care utilization spending by physicians was not associated with better outcomes for hospitalized Medicare beneficiaries in a new article published online by JAMA Internal Medicine. (2017-03-13)

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