Popular Piezoelectric News and Current Events

Popular Piezoelectric News and Current Events, Piezoelectric News Articles.
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Developing roads that can generate power from passing traffic
Researchers are looking at advanced materials for roads and pavements that could generate electricity from passing traffic. Engineers from Lancaster University are working on smart materials such as 'piezolectric' ceramics that when embedded in road surfaces would be able to harvest and convert vehicle vibration into electrical energy. (2017-09-18)

Designing a new material for improved ultrasound
Development of a theoretical basis for ultrahigh piezoelectricity in ferroelectric materials led to a new material with twice the piezo response of any existing commercial ferroelectric ceramics, according to an international team of researchers from Penn State, China and Australia. (2018-03-22)

Optical generation of ultrasound via photoacoustic effect
Limitations of the piezoelectric array technologies conventionally used for ultrasonics inspired researchers to explore an alternative mechanism for generating ultrasound via light (the photoacoustic effect). Coupling this with 3-D printing, the group was able to generate sounds fields with specific shapes for potential use in biological cell manipulation and drug delivery. As the group reports in this week's Applied Physics Letters, their work focuses on using the photoacoustic effect to control ultrasound fields in 3-D. (2017-02-28)

Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect
Researchers from IOCB Prague and IP CAS demonstrated for the first time a single molecule piezoelectric effect. The study published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society represents a breakthrough in understanding the electromechanical behavior of individual molecules and provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale. (2018-02-15)

Material can turn sunlight, heat and movement into electricity -- all at once
Many forms of energy surround you: sunlight, the heat in your room and even your own movements. All that energy -- normally wasted -- can potentially help power your portable and wearable gadgets, from biometric sensors to smart watches. Now, researchers from the University of Oulu in Finland have found that a mineral with the perovskite crystal structure has the right properties to extract energy from multiple sources at the same time. (2017-02-07)

Piezomagnetic material changes magnetic properties when stretched
Piezoelectric materials, which generate an electric current when compressed or stretched, are familiar and widely used: lighters that spark when you press a switch, microphones, sensors, motors and all kinds of other devices. Now a group of physicists has found a material with a similar property, but for magnetism. This 'piezomagnetic' material changes its magnetic properties when put under mechanical strain. (2018-03-16)

A nanophenomenon that triggers the bone-repair process
Researchers at the Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia have resolved one of the great unknowns in bone self-repair: how the cells responsible for forming new bone tissue are called into action. Their work reveals the role of an electromechanical phenomenon at the nanoscale, flexoelectricity, as a possible mechanism for stimulating the cell response and guiding it throughout the fracture repair process. (2018-01-19)

Fiber-based nanotechnology in clothing could harvest energy from physical movement
Nanotechnology researchers are developing the perfect complement to the power tie: a (2008-02-13)

Electric textile lights a lamp when stretched
Working up a sweat from carrying a heavy load? That is when the textile works at its best. Swedish researchers have developed a fabric that converts kinetic energy into electric power. The greater the load applied to the textile and the wetter it becomes the more electricity it generates. The results are now published in the Nature Partner journal Flexible Electronics. (2018-03-22)

Why cancer drugs can't take the pressure
A major reason why cancer drugs fail is that they cannot penetrate the high-pressure environment of solid tumors. A study published May 10 in Biophysical Journal reveals that hyaluronic acid is primarily responsible for generating elevated gel-fluid pressures in tumors. In a mouse model of pancreatic cancer, treatment with an enzyme that breaks down hyaluronic acid normalized fluid pressure in tumors and allowed vessels to re-expand, thereby overcoming a major barrier to drug delivery. (2016-05-10)

Magnetoelectric memory cell increases energy efficiency for data storage
A team of researchers has now developed a magnetoelectric random access memory (MELRAM) cell that has the potential to increase power efficiency, and thereby decrease heat waste, by orders of magnitude for read operations at room temperature. The research could aid production of devices such as instant-on laptops, close-to-zero-consumption flash drives, and data storage centers that require much less air conditioning. The research team reported their findings this week in Applied Physics Letters. (2017-05-30)

Taking control at the junction
Fine tuning the composition of nitride alloys can further the development of optical and electronic interface devices. (2018-01-22)

Marine exploration sensing with light and sound
Unveiling new strategies to improve future wireless underwater sensing networks for marine research and communication. (2018-03-12)

The Fitbits of food ingestion?
A multi-disciplinary team co-led by researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital and MIT has developed flexible sensors with the capacity to sense movement and ingestion in the stomach. (2017-10-10)

Harvesting energy from walking human body Lightweight smart materials-based energy harvester develop
A research team led by Professor Wei-Hsin Liao from the Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) has developed a lightweight smart materials-based energy harvester for scavenging energy from human motion, generating inexhaustible and sustainable power supply just from walking. (2019-11-20)

NIST's quick test may speed antibiotic treatment and combat drug resistance
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated a potential new tactic for rapidly determining whether an antibiotic combats a given infection, thus hastening effective medical treatment and limiting the development of drug-resistant bacteria. Their method can quickly sense mechanical fluctuations of bacterial cells and any changes induced by an antibiotic. (2017-09-22)

A new architecture for miniaturization of atomic clocks
NICT developed a simple miniaturized atomic clock system, which does not require a complicated frequency multiplication, as an outcome of a collaboration with Tohoku University and Tokyo Institute of Technology. We propose a new microwave generator that exploits thickness extensional vibration in a piezoelectric thin film to miniaturize an atomic clock. By transferring this technology into practical products, atomic clocks, which are deployed in high-end systems such as satellites, can be incorporated on smartphones. (2018-01-23)

Berkeley Lab scientists generate electricity from viruses
Berkeley Lab scientists have developed a way to generate power using harmless viruses that convert mechanical energy into electricity. The scientists tested their approach by creating a generator that produces enough current to operate a small liquid-crystal display. Their generator is the first to produce electricity by harnessing the piezoelectric properties of a biological material. (2012-05-13)

Powering a pacemaker with a patient's heartbeat
Implantable pacemakers have without doubt altered modern medicine, saving countless lives by regulating heart rhythm. But they have one serious shortcoming: Their batteries last only five to 12 years, at which point they have to be replaced surgically. Now, researchers have surmounted this issue by designing a pacemaker powered by the energy of heartbeats, according to a report in ACS Nano. The device was successfully tested in pigs, which have a similar physiology to humans. (2019-02-20)

Irish scientists can now produce electricity from tears
A team of Irish scientists has discovered that applying pressure to a protein found in egg whites and tears can generate electricity. The researchers from the Bernal Institute, University of Limerick (UL), Ireland, observed that crystals of lysozyme, a model protein that is abundant in egg whites of birds as well as in the tears, saliva and milk of mammals can generate electricity when pressed. Their report is published today (October 2) in the journal, Applied Physics Letters. (2017-10-02)

Biodegradable sensor could help doctors monitor serious health conditions
University of Connecticut engineers have created a biodegradable pressure sensor that could help doctors monitor chronic lung disease, swelling of the brain, and other medical conditions before dissolving harmlessly in a patient's body. (2018-01-16)

Engineers harvest heart's energy to power life-saving devices
The heart's motion is so powerful that it can recharge life-saving devices, according to new research from Dartmouth. Using a dime-sized invention developed by engineers at Dartmouth's Thayer School of Engineering, the heart's energy can be harnessed to power implantable devices, according to the study. Creating an energy source within the body could save millions of people who rely on pacemakers and other implantable devices from having to undergo surgery to replace batteries. (2019-02-04)

Samarium-doped crystals with 'giant' piezoelectricity
By introducing trace amounts of the element samarium (Sm), researchers greatly enhanced the performance of piezoelectric crystals used in advanced piezoelectric devices like sensors, a new study reports. (2019-04-18)

Piezoelectrics stretch their potential with a method for flexible sticking
Thin-film piezoelectrics, with dimensions on the scale of micrometers or smaller, offer potential for new applications where smaller dimensions or a lower voltage operation are required. Researchers have demonstrated a new technique for making piezoelectric microelectromechanical systems by connecting a sample of lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric thin films to flexible polymer substrates. They report their results in this week's Journal of Applied Physics. (2017-10-25)

Researchers generate electricity from low-cost biomaterial
Mobile phone speakers and motion detectors in cars and video games may soon be powered by electricity generated from low cost and sustainable biomaterials, according to research carried out at University of Limerick (UL), Ireland. (2017-12-04)

Relax, just break it
Argonne scientists and their collaborators are helping to answer long-held questions about a technologically important class of materials called relaxor ferroelectrics. (2018-07-19)

Today's highest quality composite-piezoelectric developed at NUST MISIS
NUST MISIS scientists jointly with an international group of scientists have managed to develop a composite material that has the best piezoelectric properties today. The research results were published in Scientific Reports journal. (2018-02-12)

SLAC develops novel compact antenna for communicating where radios fail
A new type of pocket-sized antenna, developed at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, could enable mobile communication in situations where conventional radios don't work, such as under water, through the ground and over very long distances through air. (2019-04-12)

Flexible sensors can detect movement in GI tract
MIT researchers have devised a flexible ingestible sensor that could help doctors to diagnose problems caused by a slowdown of food flowing through the digestive tract. The sensors could also be used to detect food pressing on the stomach, helping doctors to monitor food intake by patients being treated for obesity. (2017-10-10)

Researchers get straight to the heart of piezoelectric tissues
While some studies have supported the idea that the walls of the aorta are piezoelectric or ferroelectric, the most recent research finds no evidence of these properties. Researchers investigated by testing samples of pig aorta using a traditional setup, known as Sawyer-Tower, to detect ferroelectricity. Their experiments suggest the aorta has no special properties, and instead acts as a standard dielectric material that does not conduct current. They report their work in Applied Physics Letters. (2017-10-05)

Creating new physical properties in materials
A collaborative effort between research groups at the Technical University of Freiberg and the University of Siegen in Germany demonstrates that the physical properties of SrTiO3, or strontium titanate, in its single crystal form can be changed by a relatively simple electrical treatment. (2016-11-29)

Magnetization reversal achieved at room temperature using only an electric field
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology achieved magnetization reversal in cobalt-substituted bismuth ferrite by applying only an electric field. Such an effect had been sought after for over a decade in order to make new types of low-power-consumption magnetic memory devices. (2019-02-22)

Artificial sensor mimics human sense of touch
A new tactile sensor can detect surface shapes and structures, showing advantages over existing sensors, according to new research in IEEE/ASME Transactions on Mechatronics. (2018-11-07)

Nanowire generates power by harvesting energy from the environment
As the sizes of sensor networks and mobile devices shrink toward the microscale, and even nanoscale, there is a growing need for suitable power sources. Because even the tiniest battery is too big to be used in nanoscale devices, scientists are exploring nanosize systems that can salvage energy from the environment. Researchers at the University of Illinois have now shown that a single nanowire can produce power by harvesting mechanical energy. (2007-09-27)

Researchers ride new sound wave to health discovery
Acoustics experts have created a new class of sound wave -- the first in more than half a century -- in a breakthrough they hope could lead to a revolution in stem cell therapy. (2016-01-07)

Researchers couple artificial atom to acoustic resonator
Researchers from Russia and Britain have demonstrated an artificial quantum system, in which a quantum bit interacts with an acoustic resonator in the quantum regime. This allows the familiar effects of quantum optics to be studied on acoustic waves and enables an alternative approach to quantum computer design, which is based on acoustics and could make quantum computers more stable and compact. (2018-07-11)

UIC chemical engineers first to functionalize boron nitride with other nanosystems
Scientists report that treatment with a superacid causes boron nitride layers to separate into atomically thick sheets, while creating binding sites on the surface of these sheets that provide opportunities to interface with nanoparticles, molecules and other 2D nanomaterials, like graphene. (2018-09-25)

Pushing 'print' on large-scale piezoelectric materials
A new, inexpensive method to 'print' large-scale sheets of two dimensional (2D) piezoelectric material offers tremendous opportunity for new piezo-sensors and energy harvesting. (2018-09-06)

Power generation technology based on piezoelectric nanocomposite materials developed by KAIST
Professor Keon- Jae Lee's research team, KAIST, has developed a nanocomposite-based nanogenerator that successfully overcomes the critical restrictions existed in previous nanogenerators and builds a simple, low-cost, and large-scale self-powered energy system. The team produced a piezoelectric nanocomposite by mixing piezoelectric nanoparticles with carbon-based nanomaterials in a polydimethylsiloxane matrix and fabricated the nanocomposite generator by the simple process of spin-casting or bar-coating method. (2012-05-07)

Flexoelectricity is more than Moore
Researchers from the ICN2 Oxide Nanoelectronics Group, at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, led an international work, published today by Nature Nanotechnology, which has produced the world's first integrated flexoelectric microelectromechanical system on silicon. (2015-11-17)

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