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Popular Plankton News and Current Events

Popular Plankton News and Current Events, Plankton News Articles.
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Parents unknown
Animals in hard-to-reach places, especially strange, 'unattractive,' animals, may completely escape our attention. (2019-05-13)
The heat is on
Climate change is reorganizing the life in our oceans in a big way: as waters warm, cold-loving species, from plankton to fish, leave the area and warm water species become more successful. (2019-11-25)
UCI-led study: Plankton are more resilient to nutrient stress than previously thought
Surface ocean phosphate is a key mineral supporting the growth and diversification of phytoplankton, a marine organism the absorbs significant amounts of carbon dioxide from Earth's atmosphere. (2019-08-28)
Overfishing increases fluctuations in aquatic ecosystems
Overfishing reduces fish populations and promotes smaller sizes in fish. (2016-03-02)
Study finds body size of marine plankton, currents keys to dispersal in ocean
A new international study found that the size of plankton, and the strength and direction of currents, are key to how they are dispersed in the ocean -- much more so than physical conditions including differences in temperature, salinity and nutrient availability. (2018-01-10)
Organism responsible for paralytic shellfish poisoning may affect fisheries
New research by scientists at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology suggests that ingestion of toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense changes the energy balance and reproductive potential of Calanus finmarchicus in the North Atlantic, which is key food source for young fishes, including many commercially important species. (2016-05-27)
Herring larvae could benefit from an acidifying ocean
Excess CO2 in the atmosphere is making the oceans more acidic. (2018-03-29)
Theory of oscillations may explain biological mysteries
An article by John Vandermeer of the University of Michigan shows how extensions of established theory can model coupled oscillations resulting from interactions such as predation and competition. (2006-12-01)
Ocean floor mud reveals secrets of past European climate
Samples of sediment taken from the ocean floor of the North Atlantic Ocean have given researchers an unprecedented insight into the reasons why Europe's climate has changed over the past 3,000 years. (2017-11-23)
How corals adapt to day and night
Researchers have uncovered a gene in corals that responds to day/night cycles, which provides some tantalizing clues into how symbiotic corals work together with their plankton partners. (2008-09-12)
The size of marine plankton is key to its global dispersal and distribution
In a paper published in the latest issue of Nature Communications a group of international researchers, led by AZTI scientists, shows that the size of marine plankton is key to its global dispersal and distribution. (2018-01-10)
West Coast waters returning to normal but salmon catches lagging
Ocean conditions off most of the US West Coast are returning roughly to average, after an extreme marine heat wave from about 2014 to 2016 disrupted the California Current Ecosystem and shifted many species beyond their traditional range, according to a new report from NOAA Fisheries' two marine laboratories on the West Coast. (2018-03-09)
Rapid evolution of a calcareous microalgae
When simulating future environmental conditions researchers face a problem: laboratory experiments are easy to control and to reproduce, but are insufficient to mimic the complexity of natural ecosystems. (2018-02-14)
Trawl of Red Sea surface waters finds little plastic
The Red Sea has relatively low amounts of floating plastic debris in its surface waters due to fewer sources or faster removal. (2018-01-08)
Species hitch a ride on birds and the wind to join green roof communities
New research suggests that species that live on green roofs arrived by hitching lifts on birds or by riding air currents. (2018-04-06)
Dolphin diets suggest extreme changes in the ocean may shorten food chains
Extreme marine conditions like El Niño are associated with shorter food chain length in the California Current ecosystem, a new analysis reports. (2017-10-18)
Marine scientists discover kleptopredation -- a new way of catching prey
When it comes to feeding time sea slugs are the pirates of the underwater world -- attacking prey that have just eaten in order to plunder their target's meal, new research has found. (2017-11-01)
Scientists rethink co-evolution of marine life, oxygenated oceans
Researchers in the Department of Earth Sciences at Syracuse University have confirmed that rising oceanic and atmospheric oxygen levels co-evolved with marine life hundreds of millions of years ago. (2018-05-31)
Brain damage in fish affected by plastic nanoparticles
A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that plastic particles in water may end up inside fish brains. (2017-09-25)
The melting ice makes the sea around Greenland less saline
For the first time, ocean data from Northeast Greenland reveals the long-term impact of the melting of the Greenland ice sheet. (2017-10-13)
Giant larvaceans transfer ocean pollution by ingesting plastic waste
Pinkie-sized plankton called giant larvaceans can ingest tiny pieces of plastic and pass them in their fecal pellets, which then sink to the bottom of the ocean. (2017-08-16)
Carbonate shells change with time
The carbonate shells of tiny marine plankton, foraminifers, are important archives of geochemical records of past climates. (2017-11-02)
Rare 450-million-year-old 'cone-shaped' fossil discovery
An international team including University of Leicester researchers discover unique fossil of mysterious creature from the Ordovician period. (2018-01-23)
Scientists present El Nino
The ecological effects of the strong 2015-2016 El Niño. Carbon burial in aquatic ecosystems. (2017-02-23)
Predatory sea corals team up to feed on stinging jellyfish
Cave-dwelling corals in the Mediterranean can work alongside one another to catch and eat stinging jellyfish, a study reveals. (2018-07-31)
Global fisheries to be, on average, 20 percent less productive in 2300, UCI study finds
Scientists expect the world's fisheries to be, on average, 20 percent less productive in the year 2300, with those in the North Atlantic down nearly 60 percent and those in much of the western Pacific experiencing declines of more than 50 percent. (2018-03-08)
Pan-European sampling campaign sheds light on the massive diversity of freshwater plankton
In a major pan-European study, a research team from Germany have successfully extracted environmental DNA from as many as 218 lakes to refute a long-year belief that vital microorganisms do not differ significantly between freshwater bodies and geographic regions the way plants and animals do. (2018-01-08)
Could underwater sound waves be the key to early tsunami warnings?
Mathematicians have devised a way of calculating the size of a tsunami and its destructive force well in advance of it making landfall by measuring fast-moving underwater sound waves, opening up the possibility of a real-time early warning system. (2018-01-24)
Creative Use of Noise Brings Bio-Inspired Electronic Improvement
Researchers at Osaka University in Japan are working to exploit stochastic resonance to enhance signal transmission for a new generation of devices, using single-walled carbon nanotubes. (2017-09-25)
Climate shifts shorten marine food chain off California
Environmental disturbances such as El Niño shake up the marine food web off Southern California, new research shows, countering conventional thinking that the hierarchy of who-eats-who in the ocean remains largely constant over time. (2017-10-19)
Mobile device by UCLA enables easy prediction and control of harmful algal blooms
UCLA researchers have developed an inexpensive and portable device that can analyze water samples immediately, which would provide marine biologists with real-time insight about the possibility that the algal blooms could occur in the area they're testing. (2018-09-30)
Disruption tolerant networking to demonstrate internet in space
NASA's Human Exploration and Operations and Science Mission Directorates are collaborating to make interplanetary internet a reality. (2018-07-16)
No-fishing zones help endangered penguins
Small no-fishing zones around colonies of African penguins can help this struggling species, new research shows. (2018-01-16)
Why the seafloor starts moving
When the seabed loses its stability and starts to move, it often happens in much larger dimensions than landslides ashore -- and at slopes with very low gradients. (2018-02-13)
A virus-bacteria coevolutionary 'arms race' solves diversity by 'killing the winner'
Researchers at the Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have shed new light on a fundamental question in ecology, by improving a popular proposed scenario for diversity known as 'Kill the Winner.' Chi Xue and Nigel Goldenfeld, supported by the NASA Astrobiology Institute for Universal Biology, which Goldenfeld directs, approached the diversity paradox from the perspective of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. (2018-01-02)
Climate change and fishing create 'trap' for penguins
Endangered penguins are foraging for food in the wrong places due to fishing and climate change, new research shows. (2017-02-09)
How predatory plankton created modern ecosystems after 'Snowball Earth'
After global glaciation, predatory plankton apparently enabled the development of today's ecosystems. (2019-02-01)
Temperature, not predatory pressures, drives plankton abundance
Plankton blooms in spring are largely driven by temperature-induced increases in cell division, a new study reveals. (2016-10-20)
Changes in solar activity affect local climate
Most of the current climate models suggest that the sun has only a small effect on the global climate, but there is insufficient knowledge of the processes behind this link. (2010-12-08)
More recycling on the farm could reduce environmental problems
An analysis argues that semiclosed agricultural systems could enhance global sustainability of biological resources, curtail greenhouse gas emissions and groundwater contamination, and reduce farming's reliance on oil imports and water. (2007-05-01)
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