Popular Plant Diversity News and Current Events

Popular Plant Diversity News and Current Events, Plant Diversity News Articles.
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Freiburg biologists have analyzed in detail for the first time which animals are captured by the carnivorous waterwheel plant (2019-03-25)

Eating the flu
Given the importance and wide distribution of Influenza A viruses, it is surprising how little is known about infections of wild mammals. A new study led by Alex D. Greenwood and Gábor Á. Czirják of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in Berlin sheds light on which species are commonly infected and why. (2019-03-06)

Insect food webs
Biological diversity stabilizes species interactions. (2019-03-06)

Parasitic plants conspire to keep hosts alive
The plant that encourages kissing at Christmas is in fact a parasite, and new research reveals mistletoe has an unusual feeding strategy. When two mistletoes invade the same tree, they increase photosynthesis to get the nutrients they need, essentially sharing the tree and causing it less harm. (2021-02-23)

Grains in the rain
Of the major food crops, only rice is currently able to survive flooding. Thanks to new research, that could soon change -- good news for a world in which rains are increasing in both frequency and intensity. (2019-09-19)

Multi-ethnic neighborhoods in England retain diversity unlike in the U.S.
Multi-ethnic neighborhoods in England retain their diversity and are much more stable than such neighborhoods in the U.S., according to geographers from the U.S. and U.K. The team examined how neighborhood diversity has changed on a national scale from 1991 to 2011 using U.K. Census data. (2021-02-23)

Illuminating the genome
Development of a new molecular visualisation method, RNA-guided endonuclease -- in situ labelling (RGEN-ISL) for the CRISPR/Cas9-mediated labelling of genomic sequences in nuclei and chromosomes. (2019-03-08)

DNA exchange among species is major contributor to diversity in Heliconius butterflies
Exchange of genetic material among species played a major role in the wide diversity of Heliconius butterflies, according to a new study, results of which inform a centuries-long debate about the value of hybridization to species evolution. (2019-10-31)

Innovations for investigating the plant tree of life
Advances in genome sequencing are providing vast amounts of genetic information that researchers are using to explore the plant family tree. This special issue showcases cutting-edge techniques that are providing solutions to challenges in the study of evolution of species (or phylogenetics); issue highlights include an overview of current options for phylogenomic studies, a new natural language processing pipeline, metagenomics pipeline comparisons, and reviews of sequence capture methods and custom pipelines for marker selection. (2018-04-19)

New epidemiological study finds no connection between cases of cancer and use of plant protection products containing glyphosate
BfR Communication No. 036/2017 from 22 December 2017 Epidemiological studies are a central element of public discussion in the debate surrounding the carcinogenic potential of glyphosate. A publication that appeared in the USA in November examined whether there is a possible connection between the use of glyphosate containing plant protection products and cases of cancer among people who work in agriculture using a significantly broader data base. (2018-01-12)

How roots grow hair
The roots of plants can do a lot of things: They grow in length to reach water, they can bend to circumvent stones, and they form fine root hairs enabling them to absorb more nutrients from the soil. A team of researchers led by scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now identified an important regulator of this process. (2019-10-17)

Cigarette butts hamper plant growth -- study
Researchers have shown for the first time that cigarette butts reduce plant growth. Cigarette butts are the most common form of litter worldwide, with an estimated 4.5 trillion discarded annually. (2019-07-19)

OUP publishes free article collection about Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster
March 11, 2016, marks five years since the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster. In the last five years, researchers all over the world have been conducting substantial studies to find out the effect on the environment, human bodies, and our society. In honor of their great work, Oxford University Press has made 30 research articles about the accident from nine journals freely available to read online for a year. (2016-03-09)

Border fences pose threats to wildlife on US-Mexico border, study shows
Current and proposed border fences pose significant threats to wildlife populations, with those animals living in border regions along the Texas Gulf and California coasts showing some of the greatest vulnerability, a new study from the University of Texas at Austin shows. (2011-07-12)

Nearly 40% of species are very rare and are vulnerable to climate change
Almost 40 percent of global flora is categorized as 'exceedingly rare,' and these species are most at risk of extinction by human development and as the climate continues to change, according to new University of Arizona-led research. (2019-11-27)

Scientists from CMU and NTU Singapore discover how mechanical strain shapes plants
Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and Carnegie Mellon University in the U.S have discovered how mechanical forces can influence the shapes of plant leaves and flower petals. (2018-11-22)

Plant scientists at CSHL demonstrate new means of boosting maize yields
A team of plant geneticists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory has successfully demonstrated what it describes as a (2013-02-03)

Plant respiration could become a bigger feedback on climate than expected
New research suggests that plant respiration is a larger source of carbon emissions than previously thought, and warns that as the world warms, this may reduce the ability of Earth's land surface to absorb emissions due to fossil fuel burning. (2017-11-17)

Researchers study how to improve southern sea otter survival
Analysis of 13 years of demographic and genetic data from 1,006 sea otters to assess multiple effective population size estimators, as well as temporal trends in genetic diversity and population genetic structure, show a need for development of new delisting criteria for the southern sea otter. (2018-05-01)

More plant diversity, less pesticides
Increasing plant diversity enhances the natural control of insect herbivory in grasslands. Species-rich plant communities support natural predators and simultaneously provide less valuable food for herbivores. This was found by a team of researchers, who conducted two analogous experiments in Germany and the USA. Their results were published in Science Advances and show that increasing plant biodiversity could help reduce pesticide inputs in agricultural systems by enhancing natural biological control. (2020-11-06)

Mount Kilimanjaro: Ecosystems in global change
Land use in tropical mountain regions leads to considerable changes of biodiversity and ecological functions. The intensity of such changes is greatly affected by the climate. (2019-03-27)

How to be a winner in the game of evolution
A new study by University of Arizona biologists helps explain why different groups of animals differ dramatically in their number of species, and how this is related to differences in their body forms and ways of life. (2017-01-13)

How a fungus inhibits the immune system of plants
A newly discovered protein from a fungus is able to suppress the innate immune system of plants. This has been reported by research teams from Cologne and Würzburg in the journal Nature Communications. (2016-10-27)

The effects of variation in T6SS and bacteria on competition in host environment
A group of scientists studying the ways plant-associated bacteria interact were surprised to find that strains predicted to be more sensitive to bacteria were able to coexist with aggressor strains. 'Our findings are not consistent with a 'winner-take-all' result,' says Jeff Chang, 'and may cause researchers to think differently about bacterial behaviors that are generally assumed to be hostile and open new directions to pursue on the role of microbe-microbe interactions in plant-microbe interactions.' (2019-09-17)

Rhino genome results
A study by San Diego Zoo Global reveals that the prospects for recovery of the critically endangered northern white rhinoceros -- of which only three individuals remain -- will reside with the genetic resources that have been banked at San Diego Zoo Global's Frozen Zoo®. Frozen cell cultures housed here from nine northern white rhinos contain genetic variation that is missing in surviving individuals of this subspecies of rhinoceros, which is now extinct in the wild. (2017-01-25)

Mapping Biodiversity and Conservation Hotspots of the Amazon
Researchers have used remote sensing data to map out the functional diversity of the Peruvian Andes and Amazon basin, a technique that revealed hotspots for conservation. (2017-02-09)

How humans and their gut microbes may respond to plant hormones
A bowl of salad contains more than vitamins and minerals. Plant matter also includes remnants of the hormones plants produce to control how they grow, age, and manage water intake. Recently, scientists have reported that our gut microbes and cells may respond to these hormones and even produce similar molecules of their own. In an opinion article published in Trends in Plant Science, researchers in France explore how plant hormones may influence human health. (2017-08-22)

Caterpillar attacks allow aphids to sneak up on plants
A New Phytologist study indicates that plants prioritize the protection of flowers over leaves and that simultaneous attack by aphids, caterpillars and bacteria leaves plants vulnerable to aphids but more protected from caterpillars. (2017-12-06)

Plant perfumes woo beneficial bugs
Scientists funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council have discovered that maize crops emit chemical signals which attract growth-promoting microbes to live amongst their roots. This is the first chemical signal that has been shown to attract beneficial bacteria to the maize root environment. (2012-04-24)

Solving Darwin's 'abominable mystery': How flowering plants conquered the world
In a study publishing on Jan. 11 in the open access journal PLOS Biology, researchers found that flowering plants have small cells relative to other major plant groups, made possible by a greatly reduced genome size, and this may explain how they became dominant so rapidly in ecosystems across the world. (2018-01-11)

A Cereal survives heat and drought
An international consortium around the biologist Wolfram Weckwerth has published the genome sequence of Pearl millet, a drought resistant crop plant most important in aride regions in Africa and Asia. This plant is important to small and medium farmers who grow the plant without larger irrigation. Pearl millet delivers a good harvest index under drought and heat conditions when rice, maize or wheat already have no grains anymore. (2017-09-18)

Life in the fast lane: USU ecologist says dispersal ability linked to plants' life cycles
Utah State University ecologist Noelle Beckman says seed dispersal is an essential, yet overlooked, process of plant demography, but it's difficult to empirically observe, measure and assess its full influence. (2018-06-17)

Scientists discover new 'architecture' in corn
New research on the US's most economically important agricultural plant -- corn -- has revealed a different internal structure of the plant than previously thought, which can help optimize how corn is converted into ethanol. (2019-01-21)

Passenger pigeon case study: How even large, stable populations may be at risk for extinction
A new study on passenger pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius) genomics suggests that even species with large and stable populations can be at risk of extinction if there's a sudden environmental change. (2017-11-16)

Ethnic diversity in schools may be good for students' grades, a UC Davis study suggests
The findings suggest that schools might look for ways to provide cross-ethnic interaction among students to take advantage of ethnic diversity. (2017-09-11)

Monitor climate change, not predators, to protect lake diversity: Study
Climate change and other environmental factors are more threatening to fish diversity than predators, according to new research from the University of Guelph. It is a surprising and important finding, as humans rely upon freshwater lakes for more than one-fifth of their protein needs worldwide, says lead author Prof. Andrew MacDougall in U of G's Department of Integrative Biology. (2018-03-23)

A new tool to decipher evolutionary biology
A new bioinformatics tool to compare genome data has been developed by teams from the Max F. Perutz Laboratories, a joint venture of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna, together with researchers from Australia and Canada. The program called 'ModelFinder' uses a fast algorithm and allows previously not attainable new insights into evolution. The results are published in the influential journal Nature Methods. (2017-05-09)

Genetically boosting the nutritional value of corn could benefit millions
Rutgers scientists have found an efficient way to enhance the nutritional value of corn -- the world's largest commodity crop -- by inserting a bacterial gene that causes it to produce a key nutrient called methionine, according to a new study. (2017-10-09)

Worm pheromones protect major crops
Protecting crops from pests and pathogens without using toxic pesticides has been a longtime goal of farmers. Researchers at Boyce Thompson Institute have found that compounds from an unlikely source - microscopic soil roundworms - could achieve this aim. As described in research published in Journal of Phytopathology, these compounds helped protect major crops from various pathogens, and thus have potential to save billions of dollars and increase agricultural sustainability around the world. (2019-07-25)

Barley genome sequenced
Looking for a better beer or single malt Scotch whiskey? A team of researchers at the University of California, Riverside may have you covered. They are among a group of 77 scientists worldwide who have sequenced the complete genome of barley, a key ingredient in beer and single malt Scotch. The research, 10 years in the making, was just published in the journal Nature. (2017-04-26)

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