Popular Plant Species News and Current Events

Popular Plant Species News and Current Events, Plant Species News Articles.
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Freiburg biologists have analyzed in detail for the first time which animals are captured by the carnivorous waterwheel plant (2019-03-25)

Eating the flu
Given the importance and wide distribution of Influenza A viruses, it is surprising how little is known about infections of wild mammals. A new study led by Alex D. Greenwood and Gábor Á. Czirják of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in Berlin sheds light on which species are commonly infected and why. (2019-03-06)

Insect food webs
Biological diversity stabilizes species interactions. (2019-03-06)

Meet the tenrecs
Researchers reviewed the conservation priorities for the 31 species of tenrec -- a poorly understood family of small mammals superficially resembling hedgehogs, found only on the island of Madagascar. (2019-05-16)

Grains in the rain
Of the major food crops, only rice is currently able to survive flooding. Thanks to new research, that could soon change -- good news for a world in which rains are increasing in both frequency and intensity. (2019-09-19)

New tool developed by UBC researchers helps conservationists make smarter decisions
A new tool developed by University of British Columbia researchers could help ensure limited conservation dollars are well spent by determining which actions would save the most species per dollar. (2018-09-15)

Good neighbors
In the animal kingdom, food access is among the biggest drivers of habitat preference. It influences, among other things, how animals interact, where they roam and the amount of energy they expend to maintain their access to food. But how do different members of ecologically similar species manage to live close to each other? (2019-01-22)

Parasitic plants conspire to keep hosts alive
The plant that encourages kissing at Christmas is in fact a parasite, and new research reveals mistletoe has an unusual feeding strategy. When two mistletoes invade the same tree, they increase photosynthesis to get the nutrients they need, essentially sharing the tree and causing it less harm. (2021-02-23)

DNA exchange among species is major contributor to diversity in Heliconius butterflies
Exchange of genetic material among species played a major role in the wide diversity of Heliconius butterflies, according to a new study, results of which inform a centuries-long debate about the value of hybridization to species evolution. (2019-10-31)

The heat is on
Climate change is reorganizing the life in our oceans in a big way: as waters warm, cold-loving species, from plankton to fish, leave the area and warm water species become more successful. So say an international group of scientists in the most comprehensive assessment of the effects of ocean warming on the distribution fish communities. (2019-11-25)

Innovations for investigating the plant tree of life
Advances in genome sequencing are providing vast amounts of genetic information that researchers are using to explore the plant family tree. This special issue showcases cutting-edge techniques that are providing solutions to challenges in the study of evolution of species (or phylogenetics); issue highlights include an overview of current options for phylogenomic studies, a new natural language processing pipeline, metagenomics pipeline comparisons, and reviews of sequence capture methods and custom pipelines for marker selection. (2018-04-19)

The black forest and climate change
Silver and Douglas firs could replace Norway spruce in the long run due to their greater resistance to droughts. (2017-06-30)

New epidemiological study finds no connection between cases of cancer and use of plant protection products containing glyphosate
BfR Communication No. 036/2017 from 22 December 2017 Epidemiological studies are a central element of public discussion in the debate surrounding the carcinogenic potential of glyphosate. A publication that appeared in the USA in November examined whether there is a possible connection between the use of glyphosate containing plant protection products and cases of cancer among people who work in agriculture using a significantly broader data base. (2018-01-12)

How roots grow hair
The roots of plants can do a lot of things: They grow in length to reach water, they can bend to circumvent stones, and they form fine root hairs enabling them to absorb more nutrients from the soil. A team of researchers led by scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now identified an important regulator of this process. (2019-10-17)

Cigarette butts hamper plant growth -- study
Researchers have shown for the first time that cigarette butts reduce plant growth. Cigarette butts are the most common form of litter worldwide, with an estimated 4.5 trillion discarded annually. (2019-07-19)

Illuminating the genome
Development of a new molecular visualisation method, RNA-guided endonuclease -- in situ labelling (RGEN-ISL) for the CRISPR/Cas9-mediated labelling of genomic sequences in nuclei and chromosomes. (2019-03-08)

OUP publishes free article collection about Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster
March 11, 2016, marks five years since the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster. In the last five years, researchers all over the world have been conducting substantial studies to find out the effect on the environment, human bodies, and our society. In honor of their great work, Oxford University Press has made 30 research articles about the accident from nine journals freely available to read online for a year. (2016-03-09)

Researchers examine contaminants in hunted wildlife
Concerning environmental contaminants, game species are not subject to the same safety testing as commercially marketed livestock. (2017-08-09)

Scientists from CMU and NTU Singapore discover how mechanical strain shapes plants
Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and Carnegie Mellon University in the U.S have discovered how mechanical forces can influence the shapes of plant leaves and flower petals. (2018-11-22)

Nearly 40% of species are very rare and are vulnerable to climate change
Almost 40 percent of global flora is categorized as 'exceedingly rare,' and these species are most at risk of extinction by human development and as the climate continues to change, according to new University of Arizona-led research. (2019-11-27)

Plant respiration could become a bigger feedback on climate than expected
New research suggests that plant respiration is a larger source of carbon emissions than previously thought, and warns that as the world warms, this may reduce the ability of Earth's land surface to absorb emissions due to fossil fuel burning. (2017-11-17)

Border fences pose threats to wildlife on US-Mexico border, study shows
Current and proposed border fences pose significant threats to wildlife populations, with those animals living in border regions along the Texas Gulf and California coasts showing some of the greatest vulnerability, a new study from the University of Texas at Austin shows. (2011-07-12)

Team discovers a significant role for nitrate in the Arctic landscape
Because of the very low nitrate levels found in arctic tundra soil, scientists had assumed that plants in this biome do not use nitrate. But a new study co-authored by four Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) Ecosystems Center scientists challenges this notion. The study has important implications for predicting which arctic plant species will dominate as the climate warms, as well as how much carbon tundra ecosystems can store. (2018-03-23)

New comprehensive study on feeding patterns of tiger mosquitos in Europe
This study, published recently in the international journal Insects, was conducted by researchers from the University of Granada, the Doñana Biological Station, and the Biomedical Research Networking Centre for Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP) (2021-02-23)

Plant scientists at CSHL demonstrate new means of boosting maize yields
A team of plant geneticists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory has successfully demonstrated what it describes as a (2013-02-03)

Microbiome boost may help corals resist bleaching
Providing corals with cocktails of natural probiotics could enhance their tolerance to stress and reduce mortality in coral bleaching events. (2021-02-23)

Corals in Singapore likely to survive sea-level rise: NUS study
Marine scientists from the National University of Singapore found that coral species in Singapore's sedimented and turbid waters are unlikely to be impacted by accelerating sea-level rise (2019-07-01)

How to be a winner in the game of evolution
A new study by University of Arizona biologists helps explain why different groups of animals differ dramatically in their number of species, and how this is related to differences in their body forms and ways of life. (2017-01-13)

Mount Kilimanjaro: Ecosystems in global change
Land use in tropical mountain regions leads to considerable changes of biodiversity and ecological functions. The intensity of such changes is greatly affected by the climate. (2019-03-27)

Study provides insights for combating devastating amphibian disease
Amphibian chytridiomycosis, caused by infection with the Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis fungus, is the most devastating vertebrate disease on record. (2017-11-14)

Mechanisms explaining positional diversity of the hindlimb in tetrapod evolution
Elucidating how body parts in their earliest recognizable form are assembled in tetrapods during development is essential for understanding the nature of morphological evolution. Nagoya University researchers found in eight tetrapod species that the position of the sacral vertebrae and the hindlimbs is determined by the initiation timing of Gdf11 gene expression. This will contribute to a forthcoming model explaining the coupling of spine and hindlimb positioning - a major step in fully understanding tetrapod evolution. (2017-08-18)

Life in marine driftwood: The case of driftwood specialist talitrids
The rare and difficult-to-sample driftwood talitrids, also called driftwood hoppers, are reviewed by David Wildish in the open access journal Zoosystematics and Evolution. The scientist links these crustaceans' trend to small size (dwarfism) to the poor quality of driftwood as food, and/or the size of empty burrows they occupy. Behavioural experiments suggest that the smallest talitrids can occupy most available burrows, whereas the largest ones could complete their life cycle in 58% of them. (2017-12-20)

The effects of variation in T6SS and bacteria on competition in host environment
A group of scientists studying the ways plant-associated bacteria interact were surprised to find that strains predicted to be more sensitive to bacteria were able to coexist with aggressor strains. 'Our findings are not consistent with a 'winner-take-all' result,' says Jeff Chang, 'and may cause researchers to think differently about bacterial behaviors that are generally assumed to be hostile and open new directions to pursue on the role of microbe-microbe interactions in plant-microbe interactions.' (2019-09-17)

Celebrity fossil reveals all for science
With the help of an artist, a geology professor at Lund University in Sweden has figuratively speaking breathed life into one of science's most well-known fossil species; Agnostus pisiformis. The trilobite-like arthropod lived in huge numbers in Scandinavia a half-billion years ago. Today, this extinct species provides important clues for science in several ways. (2017-09-15)

Can pollution alter wildlife behavior?
A team of scientists from the University of Portsmouth have developed new scientific tests to better understand the effects of pollution on wildlife behavior. (2018-07-27)

Fast evolution affects everyone, everywhere
Rapid evolution of other species happens all around us all the time -- and many of the most extreme examples are associated with human influences. (2016-12-05)

Rhino genome results
A study by San Diego Zoo Global reveals that the prospects for recovery of the critically endangered northern white rhinoceros -- of which only three individuals remain -- will reside with the genetic resources that have been banked at San Diego Zoo Global's Frozen Zoo®. Frozen cell cultures housed here from nine northern white rhinos contain genetic variation that is missing in surviving individuals of this subspecies of rhinoceros, which is now extinct in the wild. (2017-01-25)

How humans and their gut microbes may respond to plant hormones
A bowl of salad contains more than vitamins and minerals. Plant matter also includes remnants of the hormones plants produce to control how they grow, age, and manage water intake. Recently, scientists have reported that our gut microbes and cells may respond to these hormones and even produce similar molecules of their own. In an opinion article published in Trends in Plant Science, researchers in France explore how plant hormones may influence human health. (2017-08-22)

Doubling down on DNA
The African clawed frog X. laevis genome contains two full sets of chromosomes from two extinct ancestors. (2016-10-19)

How a fungus inhibits the immune system of plants
A newly discovered protein from a fungus is able to suppress the innate immune system of plants. This has been reported by research teams from Cologne and Würzburg in the journal Nature Communications. (2016-10-27)

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