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Popular Plants News and Current Events, Plants News Articles.
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Team discovers a significant role for nitrate in the Arctic landscape
Because of the very low nitrate levels found in arctic tundra soil, scientists had assumed that plants in this biome do not use nitrate. (2018-03-23)
Plant respiration could become a bigger feedback on climate than expected
New research suggests that plant respiration is a larger source of carbon emissions than previously thought, and warns that as the world warms, this may reduce the ability of Earth's land surface to absorb emissions due to fossil fuel burning. (2017-11-17)
UGR research calls current methods of studying photosynthesis into question
New theory developed by Prof. Andrew Kowalski, which records non-diffusive gas transport, key to calculating water use efficiency and CO2 concentrations in plants. (2017-12-07)
Life in the fast lane: USU ecologist says dispersal ability linked to plants' life cycles
Utah State University ecologist Noelle Beckman says seed dispersal is an essential, yet overlooked, process of plant demography, but it's difficult to empirically observe, measure and assess its full influence. (2018-06-17)
Solving Darwin's 'abominable mystery': How flowering plants conquered the world
In a study publishing on Jan. 11 in the open access journal PLOS Biology, researchers found that flowering plants have small cells relative to other major plant groups, made possible by a greatly reduced genome size, and this may explain how they became dominant so rapidly in ecosystems across the world. (2018-01-11)
Ragweed casts shade on soy production
Ragweed, its pollen potent to allergy sufferers, might be more than a source of sneezes. (2018-03-28)
How a fungus inhibits the immune system of plants
A newly discovered protein from a fungus is able to suppress the innate immune system of plants. (2016-10-27)
Caterpillar attacks allow aphids to sneak up on plants
A New Phytologist study indicates that plants prioritize the protection of flowers over leaves and that simultaneous attack by aphids, caterpillars and bacteria leaves plants vulnerable to aphids but more protected from caterpillars. (2017-12-06)
RNA discovery could help boost plant heat, drought tolerance
The discovery of a RNA that can increase drought and salt tolerance in thale cress could illuminate a new research approach and hold implications for other plants, including food crops. (2017-09-18)
Anesthetics have the same effects on plants as they have on animals and humans
A new study published in Annals of Botany has shown that plants react to anesthetics similarly to the way animals and humans do, suggesting plants are ideal objects for testing anesthetics actions in future. (2017-12-11)
Light green plants save nitrogen without sacrificing photosynthetic efficiency
Scientists designed plants with light green leaves with hopes of allowing more light to penetrate the crop canopy and increase overall light use efficiency and yield. (2017-11-20)
Hunting is changing forests, but not as expected
In many tropical forests, over-hunting is diminishing the populations of animals who are vital for dispersing the seeds of woody plants. (2018-02-15)
Viral probe gives ringside view of cell-to-cell combat
A fascinating blow-by-blow account of the arms struggle between plants and viral pathogens, is revealed in new research. (2018-01-23)
Assessing carbon capture technology
Carbon capture and storage could be used to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and thus ameliorate their impact on climate change. (2016-02-17)
Worm pheromones protect major crops
Protecting crops from pests and pathogens without using toxic pesticides has been a longtime goal of farmers. (2019-07-25)
Physics, photosynthesis and solar cells
A University of California, Riverside assistant professor has combined photosynthesis and physics to make a key discovery that could help make solar cells more efficient. (2016-11-30)
Artificial leaf goes more efficient for hydrogen generation
A new study, affiliated with Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology has introduced a new artificial leaf that generates hydrogen, using the power of the Sun to mimic underwater photosynthesis. (2017-01-04)
Evolutionary crop research: Ego-plants give lower yield
Evolutionary biologists are calling for a shift in the usual plant breeding paradigm, which is based on selecting the fittest plants to create new varieties. (2017-10-02)
When did flowers originate?
Flowering plants likely originated between 149 and 256 million years ago according to new UCL-led research. (2018-02-04)
How bacteria manipulate plants
Attack at the protein front: Xanthomonas bacteria cause diseases in tomato and pepper plants and inject harmful proteins into plant cells. (2018-02-21)
Greenhouse gas 'feedback loop' discovered in freshwater lakes
Latest research finds plant debris in lake sediment affects methane emissions. (2018-05-04)
Transgenic plants against malaria
Scientists have discovered a gene that allows to double the production of artemisinin in the Artemisia annua plant. (2017-03-27)
Flowers use physics to attract pollinators
A new review indicates that flowers may be able to manipulate the laws of physics, by playing with light, using mechanical tricks, and harnessing electrostatic forces to attract pollinators. (2016-12-05)
How climate change alters plant growth
Global warming affects more than just plant biodiversity -- it even alters the way plants grow. (2018-01-12)
Scientists discover new 'architecture' in corn
New research on the US's most economically important agricultural plant -- corn -- has revealed a different internal structure of the plant than previously thought, which can help optimize how corn is converted into ethanol. (2019-01-21)
Systems biology approach identifies nutrient regulation of biological clock in plants
Using a systems biological analysis of genome-scale data from the model plant Arabidopsis, an international team of researchers identified that the master gene controlling the biological clock is sensitive to nutrient status. (2008-03-14)
Grassland plants react unexpectedly to high levels of carbon dioxide
Plants are responding in unexpected ways to increased carbon dioxide in the air, according to a 20-year study conducted by researchers at the University of Minnesota. (2018-04-20)
Yale study offers new paradigm on ecosystem ecology
Predators have considerably more influence than plants over how an ecosystem functions, according to a Yale study published today in Science. (2008-02-14)
How plants conquered the land
Research at the University of Leeds has identified a key gene that assisted the transition of plants from water to the land around 500 million years ago. (2016-05-19)
Flies and bees act like plant cultivators
Pollinator insects accelerate plant evolution, but a plant changes in different ways depending on the pollinator. (2017-03-14)
How do people choose what plants to use?
There are about 400,000 species of plants in the world. (2017-01-23)
Not all milkweed is equal for egg-laying monarchs, U of G study reveals
Milkweed plants in agricultural areas have 3 1/2 times more monarch butterfly eggs than milkweed growing in urban gardens, natural areas and roadsides, according to a new University of Guelph study. (2017-11-09)
Expanding tropical forest spells disaster for conservation
A North Carolina State University study shows that fire suppression efforts in Brazilian savannas turn many of those areas into forest lands, with negative consequences for the plants and animals that live there. (2017-08-30)
Drought-resistant plant genes could accelerate evolution of water-use efficient crops
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have identified a common set of genes that enable different drought-resistant plants to survive in semi-arid conditions, which could play a significant role in bioengineering and creating energy crops that are tolerant to water deficits. (2017-12-01)
Closed marriage: An orchid that never blooms
'When plants give up photosynthesis, this changes their relationship with other organisms, such as the insects who may pollinate them', comments Professor Suetsugu. (2018-01-11)
Freeloading orchid relies on mushrooms above and below ground
The orchid species Gastrodia pubilabiata mimics rotting mushrooms or fermented fruit, and is pollinated by fruit flies who mistakenly lay their eggs in its flowers. (2018-03-22)
Clean and green: A moss that removes lead (Pb) from water
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) in Japan have demonstrated that that moss can be a green alternative for decontaminating polluted water and soil. (2018-01-17)
Two new species of orchids discovered in Okinawa
Two new species of parasitic plants have been discovered on the main island of Okinawa, Japan, and named Gastrodia nipponicoides and Gastrodia okinawensis. (2017-04-10)
Secrets of succulents' water-wise ways revealed
Plant scientists at the University of Liverpool have revealed new insights into the mechanisms that allow certain plants to conserve water and tolerate drought. (2017-11-16)
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