Popular Poisoning News and Current Events

Popular Poisoning News and Current Events, Poisoning News Articles.
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Engineering a new cancer detection tool
E. coli may have potentially harmful effects but scientists in Australia have discovered this bacterium produces a toxin which binds to an unusual sugar that is part of carbohydrate structures present on cells not usually produced by healthy cells. This structure is a known tumor antigen leading scientists to develop a new cancer detection tool. (2017-06-07)

'Pulling' bacteria out of blood
Magnets instead of antibiotics could provide a possible new treatment method for blood infection. This involves the blood of patients being mixed with magnetic iron particles, which bind the bacteria to them after which they are removed from the blood using magnets. The initial laboratory tests at Empa in St. Gallen have been successful, and seem promising. (2016-12-07)

Young cancer survivors have twice the risk of suicide
Survivors of cancer diagnosed before the age of 25 had a more than two-fold increased risk of suicide compared to their non-cancer peers. (2016-11-30)

Scientists have discovered a new type of Botox
A new source of the botulinum neurotoxin was discovered by Canadian and American scientists in a strain of animal gut bacteria known as Enterococcus faecium. The neurotoxic protein is known for its paradoxical ability to remove wrinkles yet cause botulism, a potentially fatal illness associated with food poisoning. (2018-01-26)

Organism responsible for paralytic shellfish poisoning may affect fisheries
New research by scientists at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology suggests that ingestion of toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense changes the energy balance and reproductive potential of Calanus finmarchicus in the North Atlantic, which is key food source for young fishes, including many commercially important species. (2016-05-27)

Suicide prevention: Reacting to the tell-tale signs
Can search engines save lives? Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers are working on an approach which would enable search engines to more effectively identify users who are at risk of suicide and provide them with information on where to find help. (2016-10-25)

Gut reaction: Repeated food poisoning triggers chronic disease
Small bacterial infections that may go unnoticed and which the body easily clears without treatment, such as occurs during mild food poisoning, nevertheless can start a chain of events that leads to chronic inflammation and potentially life-threatening colitis. (2017-12-21)

Risk of chocolate poisoning in dogs peaks at Christmas, warn experts
Experts are warning of a 'significant peak' in the risk of chocolate poisoning in dogs over the Christmas period as households stock up on festive treats. (2017-12-20)

Superbug genome sequenced
The genome of a newly-emerging superbug, commonly known as Steno, has just been sequenced. The results reveal an organism with a remarkable capacity for drug resistance. The research was carried out by scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute near Cambridge and the University of Bristol. (2008-05-07)

A better informed society can prevent lead poisoning disasters
In a paper published Sept. 8 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, John R. Scully and Raymond J. Santucci address unresolved scientific questions that can help avert future lead poisoning disasters. A better-informed society can prevent such disasters from happening through improved risk assessment, anticipation and management of factors affecting lead release. (2020-09-18)

Study paves way for healthier and more robust eggs
An eggshell is made up of both organic and inorganic matter that contains calcium carbonate. One of the important findings of the study was that the nanostructure was closely linked to the presence of osteopontin, a protein which is also found in bones. (2018-04-17)

Solanine in potatoes: Green and strongly germinating potato tubers should be sorted out
Following a case of poisoning caused by a potato dish, the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment is reminding people about the correct handling of potatoes. Glycoalkaloids, of which solanine is an important derivative, are natural ingredients of the potato, but the ingestion of higher amounts of glycoalkaloids can lead to poisoning in humans. (2018-04-27)

Health Department IDs 10 outbreaks of foodborne illness using Yelp reviews since 2012
The NYC Health Department announced that since 2012, 10 outbreaks of foodborne illness were identified through a computer system jointly created with Columbia University's Department of Computer Science. Launched in 2012, the computer system tracks foodborne illnesses based on certain keywords that appear in Yelp restaurant reviews. This strategy has helped Health Department staff identify approximately 1,500 complaints of foodborne illness in New York City each year, for a total of 8,523 since July 2012. (2018-01-10)

Improved NIST SRM aids lead poisoning detection
Lead in goat blood might not be on the top of your shopping list, but for US medical personnel who each year perform more than 2 million human blood measurements, Standard Reference Material 955c from NIST can't be beat. (2007-08-03)

Four kinds of algal toxins found in San Francisco Bay shellfish
Researchers monitoring San Francisco Bay for algal toxins have found a surprising array of different toxins in the water and in mussels collected from the bay. Four different classes of toxins, including one produced in freshwater environments, occur regularly throughout the bay, according to a study led by UC Santa Cruz researchers. (2018-03-12)

The 'Batman' in hydrogen fuel cells
In a study published in Nature on Jan. 31, researchers at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) report advances in the development of hydrogen fuel cells that could increase its application in vehicles, especially in extreme temperatures like cold winters. (2019-01-30)

Iron supplements in the fight against lead
Targeted iron supplements in biscuits can achieve a striking reduction in the level of lead in children's blood in regions with high exposure to this toxic heavy metal. This has been demonstrated for the first time by an ETH-led research group in a study of schoolchildren in Morocco. (2016-10-26)

Discovery of new bacteria complicates problem with salmon poisoning in dogs
Researchers have identified for the first time another bacterium that can cause symptoms similar to 'salmon poisoning' in dogs -- and may complicate the efforts of Pacific Northwest pet owners to keep their dogs protected and healthy. (2016-11-03)

Chelation Therapy May Alter Immune System
A commonly used drug for reducing toxicological effects of lead poisoning, DMSA, may alter the immune system, a Cornell University study of pregnant rats and their offspring has found. (1999-02-22)

The body's own fat-metabolism protects against the harmful effects of sugar
Researchers at Aarhus University, Denmark, have discovered that the fat-metabolism in the cells takes place simultaneously with a detoxification of the harmful substances from the blood sugar, which can avert the damage that can in turn lead to age-related diseases such as diabetes, Alzheimer's and cancer. This indicates that we have a detoxification system which we were not previously aware of. (2017-09-15)

Kitchen towels could contribute to the growth of potential pathogens that cause food poisoning
Researchers from the University of Mauritius have shown that factors such as family size, type of diet, multi-usage of towels, among other factors, impact the growth of pathogens on kitchen towels, potentially causing food poisoning. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11, 2018 in Atlanta, Ga. (2018-06-09)

Saliva plays a role in the body's defense against traveler's diarrhea
Researchers have identified a protein in saliva (histatin-5) that protects the body from traveler's diarrhea. The findings, available online in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, may lead to the development of new preventive therapies for the disease. (2018-03-08)

Increased risk of unnatural death to people with epilepsy found
A new study has shown that people diagnosed with epilepsy in England and Wales are at increased risk of dying from suicide and accidents. Though the risks of unnatural death for people with epilepsy are still low, they are significantly higher than the general population says Dr. Hayley Gorton from The University of Manchester. (2018-04-09)

Organic insect deterrent for agriculture
Traditional insecticides are killers: they not only kill pests, they also endanger bees and other beneficial insects, as well as affecting biodiversity in soils, lakes, rivers and seas. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now developed an alternative: A biodegradable agent that keeps pests at bay without poisoning them. (2018-06-06)

Study examines sickness absence from work among abstainers, low-risk drinkers and at-risk drinkers
In a recent study, people who reported not drinking any alcohol over several years were absent from work due to illness more often than low-risk drinkers. (2018-06-06)

Hot weather not to blame for Salmonella on egg farms
New research conducted by the University of Adelaide shows there is no greater risk of Salmonella contamination in the production of free range eggs in Australia due to hot summer weather, compared with other seasons. (2017-01-05)

An emergency response to Canada's opioid overdose crisis
To help address the opioid overdose epidemic, Canada should develop a regulated program to distribute opioids and prevent deaths, argues a commentary in CMAJ. (2018-01-15)

Leading toxicologist warns against new drug of abuse
An internationally recognized toxicologist at the University of Newcastle has warned of the dangers of abusing the drug benzylpiperazine. (2007-04-27)

Scientists find a salty way to kill MRSA
Scientists have discovered a new way to attack Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. The team, from Imperial College London, have revealed how the bacteria regulates its salt levels. (2016-08-16)

Sandia attenuation technology may help resolve arsenic envirnomental crisis in Bangladesh
Technology developed at the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories to remove toxin from groundwater contaminated by nuclear waste may offer cludes about how to resolve a catastrophic environmental crisis in Bangladesh where arsenic-polluted wells are slowly poisoning and killing hundreds of thousands of people. (2000-04-12)

Environmental enrichment reverses learning impairments caused by lead poisoning
A study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health finds that environmental enrichment can reverse the long-term learning deficits caused by lead poisoning. Lead poisoning remains a major public health problem with an estimated 34 million housing units in the United States containing lead paint. The study is the first to demonstrate that the long-term deficits in cognitive function caused by lead can be reversed and offers a basis for the treatment. (2002-11-26)

Bacteria-eaters to prevent food poisoning?
Bacteria-killing viruses could be employed not just in health care, but also in the food industry, a study conducted at the University of Helsinki indicates. The researchers have been investigating the possibility of utilising phages in eradicating foodborne pathogens and preventing food poisoning (2018-02-20)

Researchers discover potential antidote to botulism
Researchers have identified a compound that strongly inhibits botulinum neurotoxin, the most toxic compound known. That inhibiting compound, nitrophenyl psoralen (NPP), could be used as a treatment to reduce paralysis induced by botulism. Botulinum neurotoxin is considered a potential bioweapon because there is no FDA-approved antidote. The research is published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (2018-11-02)

Fermentation byproduct suppresses seizures in nerve agent poisoning
A compound found in trace amounts in alcoholic beverages is more effective at combating seizures in rats exposed to an organophosphate nerve agent than the current recommended treatment, according to new research published in eNeuro. (2018-04-16)

Mercury exposure in Canada's northern indigenous communities
Mercury exposure is common in communities in Canada's north, especially in indigenous peoples who consume fish and other wild food with high mercury content, yet current clinical guidelines are not adequate for this population. A review in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.151138 provides guidance for health care providers on the effects of mercury exposure and how to manage it in patients who consume diets high in fish and marine animals. (2016-07-19)

Oxycodone use shifts in Australia after tamper-resistant versions introduced
After the introduction of tamper-resistant oxycodone in Australia, dispensing rates for higher-strength formulations decreased for people younger than 65 years, but there was no change in older adults, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2018-03-26)

Invisible threat: Listeria in smoked fish
Fish should be a regular component of our diets. It is an important source of biologically high-quality and easily digestible protein, minerals and vitamins. However, raw, smoked and cured fish products also often contain pathogenic germs, notably listeria. People can become infected by eating contaminated food and become ill with listeriosis. (2020-10-07)

The Lancet: Highly hazardous pesticides: Bans not secure storage
Global policies on access to highly hazardous pesticides - commonly ingested in acts of self-poisoning and suicide in rural Asia - should focus on national bans, rather than safe storage, according to two studies in The Lancet and The Lancet Global Health journals. (2017-08-11)

Pitt research shows early lead exposure is a significant cause of juvenile delinquency
Children exposed to lead have significantly greater odds of developing delinquent behavior, according to a University of Pittsburgh researcher. The study results, directed by Herbert Needleman, M.D., professor of child psychiatry and pediatrics, were presented today at the 2000 Pediatric Academic Societies and American Academy of Pediatrics Joint Meeting. (2000-05-14)

Astonishing effect enables better palladium catalysts
The taste of the chocolate cake's icing should not depend on whether it is served on a porcelain or a silver plate. Similarly, for chemical reactions on the surface of large precious metal grains, the substrate (the so-called support) should not play a crucial role. Experimental studies performed at TU Wien led to surprising findings. Chemical processes on palladium grains, which are also used for exhaust gas catalysts, changed significantly when they were placed on specific support materials. (2018-05-15)

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