Popular Polar Research News and Current Events

Popular Polar Research News and Current Events, Polar Research News Articles.
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Glaciers accelerate in the Getz region of West Antarctica
Glaciers in West Antarctica are moving more quickly from land into the ocean, contributing to rising global sea levels. A 25-year record of satellite observations has been used to show widespread increases in ice speed across the Getz sector for the first time, with some ice accelerating into the ocean by nearly 50%. (2021-02-23)

Research pioneers
Five UC Santa Barbara professors join the ranks as Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) for 2018. Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers for 'their efforts toward advancing science applications that are deemed scientifically or socially distinguished.' (2018-11-27)

Mars is emerging from an ice age
Radar measurements of Mars' polar ice caps reveal that the mostly dry, dusty planet is emerging from an ice age, following multiple rounds of climate change. (2016-05-26)

Increasing loss of spring sea ice taxes polar bear metabolism
Tracking polar bears during the spring -- their prime hunting season, when sea ice conditions should be ideal -- reveals that in recent years, many bears are expending notably more energy than they are consuming. (2018-02-01)

Animal images used in marketing may skew public perception about their survival risks
Many of the world's most charismatic animal species -- those that attract the largest interest and deepest empathy from the public -- are at high risk of extinction in part because many people believe their iconic stature guarantees their survival. (2018-04-12)

Update on the Larsen-C iceberg breakaway
Since an iceberg four times the size of London broke free earlier this month, scientists have continued to track its progress using satellites. Their observations show the Larsen-C story might not be over yet. (2017-08-02)

Unraveling a major cause of sea ice retreat in the Arctic Ocean
Quantitative analysis has evidenced the acceleration system of melting ice: dark water surfaces absorb more heat than white ice surfaces, thus melting ice and making more water surfaces in the Arctic Ocean. (2017-09-06)

Tropical Cyclone Joyce makes landfall on Australia's Pilbara Coast
NOAA's JPSS-1 satellite provided a visible image of the tropical storm after it made landfall along the Pilbara Coast in the northwestern part of Western Australia. (2018-01-12)

Tropical Cyclone Joyce soaking northwestern Australia coast
Tropical Cyclone Joyce, formerly known as tropical cyclone 5S, was moving south along the coast of Cape Leveque, Western Australia on Jan. 11 when a polar-orbiting satellite passed overhead. NOAA's JPSS-1 satellite provided a visible image of the tropical storm as it continued to move south along the northwestern part of Western Australia. (2018-01-11)

Polar vortex defies climate change in the Southeast
Overwhelming scientific evidence has demonstrated that our planet is getting warmer due to climate change, yet parts of the eastern US are actually getting cooler. According to a Dartmouth-led study in Geophysical Research Letters, the location of this anomaly, known as the 'US warming hole,' is a moving target. During the winter and spring, the US warming hole sits over the Southeast, as the polar vortex allows arctic air to plunge into the region, resulting in persistently cooler temperatures. (2018-02-13)

Climate variability -- past and future
On the basis of a unique global comparison of data from core samples extracted from the ocean floor and the polar ice sheets, AWI researchers have now demonstrated that, though climate changes have indeed decreased around the globe from glacial to interglacial periods, the difference is by no means as pronounced as previously assumed (Nature advanced online publication). Until now, it was believed that glacial periods were characterised by extreme temperature variability, while interglacial periods were relatively stable. (2018-02-05)

Shedding light on arctic zooplankton in the dark
We know that tiny marine creatures in the Arctic respond to weak light from the Moon or the Northern Lights during the polar night. Now researchers have learned that artificial light from research vessels can also have a negative effect. (2018-02-01)

Wandering greenhouse gas
On the seafloor of the shallow coastal regions north of Siberia, microorganisms produce methane when they break down plant remains. If this greenhouse gas finds its way into the water, it can also become trapped in the sea ice that forms in these coastal waters. (2018-03-16)

New species discovered in Antarctica
A team of Japanese scientists has discovered a new species of polychaete, a type of marine annelid worm, 9-meters deep underwater near Japan's Syowa Station in Antarctica, providing a good opportunity to study how animals adapt to extreme environments. (2017-02-08)

Study shows polar bear metabolic rates are higher than previously predicted
A new study on polar bear metabolism, behavior, and foraging success sheds important light on their energy demands. The study, published in the journal Science, found that polar bears have metabolic rates greater than previously predicted and greater than other terrestrial mammals of similar size. The study reinforces the understanding that polar bears are reliant on a diet of fat-rich seals to survive in the energetically-demanding Arctic. (2018-02-01)

Does Mars have rings? Not right now, but maybe one day
Purdue researchers developed a model that suggests that debris that was pushed into space from an asteroid or other body slamming into Mars around 4.3 billion years ago and alternates between becoming a planetary ring and clumping up to form a moon. (2017-03-20)

Researchers create first global map of water in Moon's soil
A new study maps the trace concentrations of water implanted in the lunar soil by the solar wind, a water source that could be used as resource in future lunar exploration. (2017-09-13)

Albatross populations in decline from fishing and environmental change
The populations of wandering, black-browed and grey-headed albatrosses have halved over the last 35 years on sub-antarctic Bird Island according to a new study published today (Nov. 20) in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2017-11-20)

Scientists create complex transmembrane proteins from scratch
Molecular engineers have now show that it is possible to build complex, custom-designed transmembrane proteins from scratch. In the living world, transmembrane proteins naturally occur embedded in the membranes of cells and cellular organelles. They are essential for a number of functions, such as movement of signals or substances from inside or outside a living cell. The ability to design synthetic proteins to span membranes could allow scientists to build ones that can perform specific, useful tasks. (2018-03-01)

New Antarctic geological timeline aids future sea-level predictions
Radiocarbon dates of tiny fossilized marine animals found in Antarctica's seabed sediments offer new clues about the recent rapid ice loss from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and help scientists make better predictions about future sea-level rise. This region of the icy continent is thought to be vulnerable to regional climate warming and changes in ocean circulation. (2013-01-16)

Shedding light on the science of auroral breakups
Japanese scientists have quantitatively confirmed how energetic an auroral breakup can be. Using a combination of cutting-edge ground-based technology and new space-borne observations, they have demonstrated the essential role of an auroral breakup in ionizing the deep atmosphere. The research furthers our understanding of one of the most visually stunning natural phenomena. (2019-02-08)

SwRI scientists discover evidence of ice age at martian north pole
Using radar data collected by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, a Southwest Research Institute-led team found evidence of an ice age recorded in the polar deposits of Mars. Ice ages on Mars are driven by processes similar to those responsible for ice ages on Earth, that is, long-term cyclical changes in the planet's orbit and tilt, which affect the amount of solar radiation it receives at each latitude. (2016-05-26)

Arctic sea ice annual freeze-up underway
After reaching the second-lowest extent ever recorded last month, sea ice in the Arctic has begun to refreeze in the face of autumn temperatures, closing both the Northern Sea Route and the direct route through the Northwest Passage. (2008-10-03)

Strange things happen when a crystal gets split in two
Researchers at the Vienna University of Technology have carefully broken potassium tantalate crystals in specific directions, and imaged the resulting surfaces using a state of the art atomic force microscope. Their data was combined with computations and a series of remarkable phenomena were ultimately explained. The results were published in the journal Science, and are potentially useful for technologies such as hydrogen production. (2018-02-01)

AK-launched rockets to study X-rays, create polar mesospheric cloud
Between Jan. 15-31, 2018, scientists will launch four rockets to measure X-ray emissions from space and determine how large quantities of water could affect the upper atmosphere and form Polar Mesospheric clouds, or PMCs. (2018-01-09)

2008 ozone hole larger than last year
The 2008 ozone hole -- a thinning in the ozone layer over Antarctica -- is larger both in size and ozone loss than 2007 but is not as large as 2006. (2008-10-07)

VIIRS satellite instrument gets 2 views of Tropical Cyclone Marcus
Tropical Cyclone Marcus was moving along the northern coast of Australia when the VIIRS instrument that flies aboard two different satellites captured true-color images of the storm over two days. (2018-03-19)

Antarctic meltwater streams shed light on longstanding hydrological mystery
In one of the coldest, driest places on Earth, CU Boulder scientists have developed a possible answer to a longstanding mystery about the chemistry of streamflow, which may have broad implications for watersheds and water quality around the world. (2019-02-01)

The start of 'healing' for the Antarctic ozone hole?
After persisting for decades, the hole in the ozone over the Antarctic has begun to 'heal,' exhibiting an ozone increase, a new study reports. (2016-06-30)

Scientists present El Nino
The ecological effects of the strong 2015-2016 El NiƱo. Carbon burial in aquatic ecosystems. The presence of pharmaceuticals in streams. (2017-02-23)

NSF-funded researchers find that ice sheet is dynamic and has repeatedly grown and shrunk
The East Antarctic Ice Sheet locks away enough water to raise sea level an estimated 53 meters (174 feet), more than any other ice sheet on the planet. It's also thought to be among the most stable, not gaining or losing mass even as ice sheets in West Antarctica and Greenland shrink. (2017-12-14)

Thawing permafrost 50 million years ago led to global warming events
In a new study reported in Nature, climate scientist Rob DeConto of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and colleagues elsewhere propose a simple new mechanism to explain the source of carbon that fed a series of extreme warming events about 55 million years ago, the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, and a sequence of similar, smaller warming events afterward. (2012-04-04)

Polar bears finding it harder to catch enough seals to meet energy demands
A new study finds polar bears in the wild have higher metabolic rates than previously thought, and as climate change alters their environment a growing number of bears are unable to catch enough prey to meet their energy needs. (2018-02-01)

On second thought, the Moon's water may be widespread and immobile
A new analysis of data from two lunar missions finds evidence that the Moon's water is widely distributed across the surface and is not confined to a particular region or type of terrain. (2018-02-23)

NASA's longest running survey of ice shattered records in 2017
Last year was a record-breaking one for Operation IceBridge, NASA's aerial survey of the state of polar ice. (2018-02-13)

Study in mice examines impact of reused cooking oil on breast cancer progression
New study in mice by University of Illinois researchers finds that the compounds in thermally abused cooking oils may trigger genetic, biochemical changes that hasten the progression of late-stage breast cancer, promoting tumor cells' growth and proliferation. (2019-03-21)

Virtual contact lenses for radar satellites
Radar satellites supply the data used to map sea level and ocean currents. However, up until now the radar's 'eyes' have been blind where the oceans are covered by ice. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now developed a new analysis method to solve this problem. (2018-04-16)

Severe ozone depletion avoided
We are already reaping the rewards of the Montreal Protocol, with the ozone layer in much better shape than it would have been without the UN treaty, according to a new study in Nature Communications. (2015-05-26)

Scientists drill to record depths in West Antarctica
A team of scientists and engineers has for the first time successfully drilled over two kilometres through the ice sheet in West Antarctica using hot water. This research will help understand how the region will respond to a warming climate. (2019-01-24)

Arctic sea ice affects and is affected by mid-latitude weather
New work by Dr Michael Kelleher and Prof James Screen from the University of Exeter find evidence that sea ice change is both a driver of and a response to atmospheric variability. (2017-12-15)

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