Popular Pollutants News and Current Events

Popular Pollutants News and Current Events, Pollutants News Articles.
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New material cleans and splits water
Researchers at EPFL's Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering have developed a photocatalytic system based on a material in the class of metal-organic frameworks. The system can be used to degrade pollutants present in water while simultaneously producing hydrogen that can be captured and used further. (2018-11-05)

Bacteria-killing gel heals itself while healing you
McMaster researchers have developed a novel new gel made entirely from bacteria-killing viruses. The anti-bacterial gel, which can be targeted to attack specific forms of bacteria, holds promise for numerous beneficial applications in medicine and environmental protection. (2019-07-25)

Climate change expected to increase premature deaths from air pollution
A new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill estimates that future climate change, if left unaddressed, is expected to cause roughly 60,000 deaths globally in the year 2030 and 260,000 deaths in 2100 due to climate change's effect on global air pollution.    (2017-07-31)

Important development could reduce numbers of fish required in toxicology research
Scientists at the University of Plymouth, working in partnership with AstraZeneca, have developed a new method which could help assess the effects of chemicals on digestive systems. (2018-03-26)

Early-life events linked to lung health in young adulthood
Early-life events, such as the exposure to air pollutants, increases the risk of chronic lung disease in young adulthood, according to new results by researchers at Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, published in the European Respiratory Journal and Thorax. The studies add to the growing evidence that chronic lung disease in adulthood can be traced back to childhood. (2020-11-12)

From pollutants to human health: Key questions for a better environmental future in Europe
A new study, published in the journal Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, wants to shape a new guideline --with a more global and coordinated perspective-- for several social and economic sectors in the field of chemical products and management of environmental risks in Europe. (2018-07-20)

Put a charge on it
The results, published in Nature Materials, make the US Department of Energy 150ºC challenge for emissions more attainable. Scientists from the López Group propose a dynamic charge and oxidation state for Single-Atom Catalysts. The dynamic charge transfer between metal and oxide is crucial to understanding the nature of the active site in Single-Atom Catalysts. (2019-08-05)

Asthma attacks reduced in tree-lined urban neighborhoods
People living in polluted urban areas are far less likely to be admitted to hospital with asthma when there are lots of trees in their neighborhood, a study by the University of Exeter's medical school has found. (2017-11-17)

Air pollution is associated with cancer mortality beyond lung cancer
A large scale epidemiological study associates some air pollutants with kidney, bladder and colorectal cancer death. (2017-10-31)

Cocktail tests on toxic waste called for
Surprisingly low concentrations of toxic chemicals -- from fungicides to antidepressants -- can change the way some aquatic creatures swim and feed, according to new research. In addition, depending on the cocktail of toxins they can produce unexpected results. (2017-10-16)

New standards for better water quality in Europe
The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) is due to be revised by 2019. The necessary work process is already in full swing and scientific research is providing important input. In a recent study under the auspices of the UFZ, an international team of researchers formulated recommendations designed to improve the monitoring, assessment and management of pollutants. The study was recently published in the journal Science of the Total Environment. (2017-02-27)

Fracking likely to result in high emissions
Natural gas releases fewer greenhouse gases than other fossil fuels. That's why it is often seen as a bridge technology to a low-carbon future. A study by the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) has estimated emissions from shale gas production through fracking in Germany and the UK. It shows that CO2-eq. emissions would exceed the estimated current emissions from conventional gas production in Germany. The potential risks make strict adherence to environmental standards vital. (2019-07-25)

'Excess emissions' make significant contribution to air pollution
A study by Indiana University researchers shows that excess emissions -- which occur with plant shut-downs, start-ups and malfunctions, and not just in connection with natural disasters -- can make serious contributions to overall air pollution. (2018-02-14)

New catalyst meets challenge of cleaning exhaust from modern engines
Researchers have created a catalyst capable of reducing pollutants at the lower temperatures expected in advanced engines. (2017-12-14)

Cutting carbon emissions sooner could save 153 million lives
Up to 153 million premature deaths linked to air pollution could be avoided this century if governments accelerate efforts to reduce fossil fuel emissions, a Duke-led study finds. Deaths would drop on every inhabited continent, but the greatest drops would occur in Asia and Africa. The study projects the number of lives that could be saved in 154 cities worldwide if emissions are reduced and global temperature rise is limited to 1.5oC sooner than later. (2018-03-19)

Heavy metal link to mutations, low growth and fertility among crustaceans in Sydney Harbor tributary
Heavy metal pollutants are linked to genetic mutations, stunted growth and declining fertility among small crustaceans in the Parramatta River, the main tributary of Sydney Harbor, new research shows. The finding adds to mounting evidence that toxic sediments and seaweeds in Sydney Harbor are a deadly diet for many sea creatures. (2008-08-25)

Salty snow could affect air pollution in the Arctic
In pictures, the Arctic appears pristine and timeless with its barren lands and icy landscape. In reality, the area is rapidly changing. Scientists are working to understand the chemistry behind these changes to better predict what could happen to the region in the future. One team reports in ACS' Journal of Physical Chemistry A that sea salt could play a larger role in the formation of local atmospheric pollutants than previously thought. (2016-10-12)

Fish lice could be early indicators of metal pollution in freshwater
Water quality in rivers and dams is decaying all over the world, and metal pollution is a major factor. Meanwhile, freshwater resources are very limited. A tiny fish louse shows promise as a sensitive early indicator for metal pollution in freshwater. (2018-08-23)

Substances used in household goods affect the immune system of a coastal mussel
In a study published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, researchers from National University of Singapore have determined how perfluoalkyl substances (PFAS) affect the immune system of green mussels. Mussels, and other invertebrates, play an essential role in their ecosystem, and the ocean is the final sink for many pollutants like PFAS, so it is important to monitor regions that may have higher environmental concentrations due to unregulated discharges of these substances. (2018-02-05)

Connection between home energy efficiency and respiratory health in low-income homes
A new study finds people living in drafty homes in low-income, urban communities are at a higher risk of respiratory health issues. (2019-02-11)

Nitrogen, phosphorus from fertilizers and pet waste polluting urban water
New research from the University of Minnesota points to lawn fertilizers and pet waste as the dominant sources of nitrogen and phosphorus pollutants in seven sub-watersheds of the Mississippi River in Saint Paul, Minn. (2017-04-05)

Fire air pollution weakens forest productivity
Fire impacts on global carbon cycle. The damage to ecosystem productivity not only occurs in fire regimes, but also over the downwind areas through long-range transport of air pollution. Such negative impacts may exacerbate in the future as fire activities are expected to escalate in a warming climate. (2018-12-21)

How environmental pollutants and genetics work together in rheumatoid arthritis
New research documents how chemicals and a certain gene activate an enzyme to increase the risk and severity of RA and bone destruction. (2018-04-19)

One in four Americans suffer when exposed to common chemicals
University of Melbourne research reveals that one in four Americans report chemical sensitivity, with nearly half this group medically diagnosed with Multiple Chemical Sensitivities (MCS), suffering health problems from exposure to common chemical product. (2018-03-14)

High blood pressure linked to short-, long-term exposure to some air pollutants
High blood pressure was associated with short-term and long-term exposure to some air pollutants commonly associated with the burning / combustion of fossil fuels, dust and dirt. Researchers suggest people -- especially those with high blood pressure -- limit their time outdoors when pollution levels are high. (2016-05-31)

Those living near oil and gas facilities may be at higher risk of disease
People living near oil and gas facilities along Colorado's Northern Front Range may be exposed to hazardous air pollutants, including carcinogens like benzene, that could pose health risks above levels deemed acceptable by the US Environmental Protection Agency, according to researchers at the Colorado School of Public Health, Boulder County Public Health, CU Boulder, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the University of California Irvine. (2018-04-09)

Blacks have more exposure to air pollutants raising heart disease risk, death
Blacks often have higher exposures to air pollutants than whites, elevating their risk for developing heart disease and death. Air pollution is associated with elevated blood sugar, blood vessel dysfunction, heart disease and death. (2018-03-15)

Plastic fantastic -- researchers turn plastic pollution into cleaners
Scientists at the University of Bristol have discovered a way to re-use a common plastic to break down harmful dyes in our waste water. (2018-03-14)

Short-lived greenhouse gases cause centuries of sea-level rise
Even if there comes a day when the world completely stops emitting greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, coastal regions and island nations will continue to experience rising sea levels for centuries afterward, according to a new study by researchers at MIT and Simon Fraser University. (2017-01-09)

Air pollution may impact fetal cardiovascular system, Rutgers study says
Microscopic particles in air pollution inhaled by pregnant women may damage fetal cardiovascular development, according to a study by Rutgers researchers. The study, published in the journal Cardiovascular Toxicology, found that early in the first trimester and late in the third trimester were critical windows during which pollutants most affect the mother's and fetus' cardiovascular systems. (2019-03-11)

Rapid pollution increases may be as harmful to the heart as absolute levels
Rapid increases in pollution may be as harmful to the heart as sustained high levels, according to research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology,1 a European Society of Cardiology journal. The authors urgently call for confirmatory studies as even residents of clean air cities could be at risk. (2018-02-15)

The changing chemistry of the Amazonian atmosphere
Researchers have been debating whether nitrogen oxides (NOx) can affect levels of OH radicals in a pristine atmosphere but quantifying that relationship has been difficult. Now, Harvard researchers have found that accompanying the increase of NOx concentration from urban pollution, daytime peak OH concentrations in the rainforest skyrocketed, increasing by at least 250 percent. These increased levels of OH concentrations in the Amazon atmosphere could lead to changes in atmospheric chemistry, cloud formation, and rainfall (2018-04-11)

Wine 'legs' and minibot motors (video)
As any wine enthusiast knows, the 'legs' that run down a glass after a gentle swirl of vino can yield clues about alcohol content. Interestingly, the physical phenomenon that helps create these legs can be harnessed to propel tiny motors to carry out tasks on the surface of water. Scientists demonstrate the motors in a report in ACS' journal Langmuir. (2017-11-15)

Tiny membrane key to safe drinking water
Using their own specially designed form of graphene, 'Graphair', CSIRO scientists have supercharged water purification, making it simpler, more effective and quicker. (2018-02-14)

Contribution of MOTs to road safety
The study 'Contribution of MOTs to road safety and the protection of citizens' health and the environment,' conducted by the Motor Vehicle Safety Institute 'Duque de Santomauro' of Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, reveals that the Ministry of Transport tests (MOTs) prevent 133 deaths, nearly 12,000 injuries of differing severity and at least 17,700 traffic accidents a year. (2018-07-10)

DDT in Alaska meltwater poses cancer risk for people who eat lots of fish
Children in Alaska whose diet includes a lot of fish from rivers fed by the Eastern Alaska Mountain Range may have a long-term elevated risk for cancer because of insecticides -- including DDT -- in the meltwater. (2018-12-07)

Air pollution damages more than lungs: Heart and blood vessels suffer too
According to an article published in the Aug. 26, 2008, issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, air pollution has both short- and long-term toxic effects that injure the heart and blood vessels, increase rates of hospitalization for cardiac illness and can even cause death. (2008-08-13)

New green solvent could help clean our air
French researchers have patented an eco-friendly liquid mixture that could help trap harmful pollutants from the air. The non-flammable solvent contains urea and choline salt, a common ingredient in chicken feed, says Leila Moura of the Unité de Chimie Environnementale et Interactions sur le Vivant in France. She is the lead author of a study in Springer's journal Environmental Chemistry Letters. (2017-08-24)

Air pollution exposure on home-to-school routes reduces the growth of working memory
A study published in Environment International has demonstrated that exposure to air pollution on the way to school can have damaging effects on children's cognitive development. The study, led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health, found an association between a reduction in working memory and exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and black carbon during the walking commute to and from school. (2017-10-05)

The big picture of Great Lakes mercury pollution
A transdisciplinary team examined regulatory impacts on Great Lakes mercury, focusing on an Upper Peninsula tribal community with high fish consumption. (2018-01-23)

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