Popular Positive Emotions News and Current Events

Popular Positive Emotions News and Current Events, Positive Emotions News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Eight of 10 people with cancer risk genes don't know it
Genomic screening of more than 50,000 people shows that more than 80 percent of those who carry an identifiable genetic risk for breast, ovarian, prostate, and pancreatic cancer don't know it despite frequent interaction with the healthcare system. (2018-09-21)

Non-invasive first trimester blood test reliably detects Down's syndrome
Cell-free fetal DNA testing, which measures the relative amount of free fetal DNA in a pregnant woman's blood, is a new screening test that indicates the risk of Down syndrome (trisomy 21), (2015-02-02)

Seasonal variation in daylight influences brain function
A Finnish research group has studied how seasons influence the function of the brain. Researchers at the Turku PET Centre showed that the length of daylight affects the opioid receptors, which in turn regulates the mood we experience. (2021-02-23)

Brain neurons help keep track of time
Turning the theory of how the human brain perceives time on its head, a novel analysis in mice reveals that dopamine neuron activity plays a key role in judgment of time, slowing down the internal clock. (2016-12-08)

Obesity and health problems: New research on a safeguard mechanism
Obesity and health problems: Researchers at Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital in Montreal shed light on a safeguard mechanism. (2018-03-16)

Social grooming factors influencing social media civility on COVID-19
A new study analyzing tweets about COVID-19 found that users with larger social networks tend to use fewer uncivil remarks when they have more positive responses from others. (2020-04-20)

Can AI spot liars?
Though algorithms are increasingly being deployed in all facets of life, a new USC study has found that they fail basic tests as truth detectors. (2019-09-04)

Quantifying nature's mental health benefits
The BioScience Talks podcast features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences. (2017-03-08)

Could mental math boost emotional health?
Engaging the brain's dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DL-PFC) while doing mental math may be connected with better emotional health, according to Duke researchers. Although they seem unrelated, doing 'cold' calculations and regulating 'hot' emotions both rely on similar mental gymnastics: the ability to manipulate and update information. Increased DL-PFC activity has been associated with fewer symptoms of anxiety and depression. (2016-10-10)

School performance and body weight affects kids' self-esteem, study shows
It's well-known that within the adult population body weight and self esteem are very much inter related. But until now, the same wasn't known about children's healthy body weight and its relationship with a positive self-image. (2009-01-20)

Feelings of ethical superiority can lead to workplace ostracism, social undermining: Study
A new Baylor study published in the Journal of Business Ethics suggests that feelings of ethical superiority can cause a chain reaction that is detrimental to you, your coworkers and your organization. (2018-04-24)

Intestinal worms may solve allergy puzzle
Young people with parasite worms currently have a four times higher risk for developing allergies and asthma than others. (2017-12-04)

Physiological markers for cutting, other self-harming behaviors by teenage girls found
Non-fatal, self-inflicted injuries by adolescent and young adult females have become major public health problems and researchers have found physiological evidence that this behavior may lead to a more serious psychological condition called borderline personality disorder. (2006-06-16)

How technology use affects at-risk adolescents
More use of technology led to increases in attention, behavior and self-regulation problems over time for adolescents already at risk for mental health issues, a new study from Duke University finds. However, on days that adolescents spent more time using digital technologies they were less likely to report symptoms of depression and anxiety. (2017-05-03)

Appetizing imagery puts visual perception on fast forward
People rated images containing positive content as fading more smoothly compared with neutral and negative images, even when they faded at the same rate, according to findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (2017-10-05)

Attention, bosses: Why angry employees are bad for business
According to University of Arizona research, employees who are angry are more likely to engage in unethical behavior at work -- even if the source of their anger is not job-related. (2016-11-14)

New blood test for the detection of bovine TB
A new blood test to detect Mycobacteria in blood has been developed by a team at The University of Nottingham. The researchers have used this new method to show that cattle diagnosed with bovine tuberculosis (bTB) have detectable levels of the bacterium Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) in their blood which causes this disease. The research paper is available on request. (2016-05-31)

Using envy as a marketing tool can backfire
For decades, marketers have used envy to sell, attempting to cash in on consumers' desire to want what others have. But does it actually work? According to a new study from the UBC Sauder School of Business, employing envy can boost brands but it can also completely backfire -- and it depends on a consumer's self-esteem. (2018-06-05)

Attitudes about health affect how older adults engage with negative health news
To get older adults to pay attention to important health information, preface it with the good news about their health. That's one takeaway from a study that found older adults are more willing to engage with negative health information when they have a positive attitude about their health. (2019-03-05)

The digital transformation of news media and the rise of online disinformation
A new report by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre contains an overview of the relevant economic research literature on the digital transformation of news markets and related impact on the quality of news. (2018-04-27)

Self-rating mental health as 'good' predicts positive future mental health
Researchers have found that when a person rates their current mental health as 'positive' despite meeting criteria for a mental health problem, it can predict good mental health in the future, even without treatment. (2018-04-02)

Mindful yoga can reduce risky behaviors in troubled youth, says UC research
Study shows a marked reduction in risky sex and substance abuse in troubled 18- to 24-year-olds after several months of participating in mindful yoga and positive coping strategies. (2017-12-07)

How emotions influence our internal clock
A research team headed by Freiburg psychologist finds previously unknown effects. (2017-11-14)

Too much commitment may be unhealthy for relationships, UH psychology professor says
Researchers at the University of Houston report that partners who base their self-worth solely upon the outcomes of romantic interactions may experience depression and anxiety and ultimately undermine their relationships. (2008-12-02)

We read emotions based on how the eye sees
We use others' eyes -- whether they're widened or narrowed -- to infer emotional states, and the inferences we make align with the optical function of those expressions, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The research reveals, for example, that people consistently associate narrowed eyes -- which can enhance visual discrimination -- with discrimination-related emotions including disgust and suspicion. (2017-02-22)

Community factors and social connection may determine whether sexual minority parents view their community as tolerant versus supportive
A new Family Relations study has found that lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) parents feel more positive about where they live when that place is more legally, politically, and religiously supportive of LGB people; when there are more LGB-friendly employers; and when there are other LBG-headed households. (2017-12-20)

Breast size dissatisfaction affects self-examination
New research shows that women who are dissatisfied with the size of their breasts are less likely to carry out regular self-examinations to screen for breast cancer. (2018-01-04)

Pride tops guilt as a motivator for environmental decisions
A lot of pro-environmental messages suggest that people will feel guilty if they don't make an effort to live more sustainably or takes steps to ameliorate climate change. But a recent study from Princeton University finds that highlighting the pride people will feel if they take such actions may be a better way to change environmental behaviors. (2018-02-13)

Brain training for old dogs: Could touchscreen games be the Sudoku of man's best friend?
Spoiling old dogs in their twilight years by retiring them to the sofa and forgiving them their stubbornness or disobedience, doesn't do our four-legged friends any good. Regular brain training and lifelong learning create positive emotions and can slow down mental deterioration in old age. Physical limitations, however, often do not allow the same sort of training as used in young dogs. Cognitive biologists from Vetmeduni Vienna propose computer interaction as a practical alternative. (2018-02-07)

We feel connected when we move together in time with music
Go dancing! A new study conduted at Center for Music in the Brain at Aarhus University, Denmark, suggest that then moving together with music, synchronous movements between individuals increase social closeness. (2020-06-26)

In test of wisdom, new research favors Yoda over Spock
A person's ability to reason wisely about a challenging situation may improve when they also experience diverse yet balanced emotions, say researchers from the University of Waterloo. (2019-01-28)

Putting oneself in another person's place is the best antidote against prejudice
Research performed by a team at the School of Education at the University of Cordoba shows an indirect relationship between empathy and the development of prejudices by means of personality and ideological attitudes. (2018-06-25)

Science confirms you should stop and smell the roses
A UBC researcher says there's truth to the idea that spending time outdoors is a direct line to happiness. In fact, Holli-Anne Passmore says if people simply take time to notice the nature around them, it will increase their general happiness and well-being. (2017-11-03)

New study advances treatment options for PTSD
Dr. Stephen Maren, University Distinguished Professor in the Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, recently published significant research on the psychological and neural basis of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). (2019-04-11)

A mom's support helps a child learn to handle negative emotions, but what if mom is distressed?
When children become upset, showing negative emotions or behaviors, some parents become distressed, while others are able to talk their child through the difficult situation. Studies have shown that a mothers' reaction -- positive or negative -- to her child's negative emotions can predict whether her child develops the ability to effectively regulate his emotions and behavior. A new University of Illinois study explores potential predictors of mothers' supportive or non-supportive behavior during emotional challenges. (2017-11-17)

Distorted view amongst smokers of when deadly damage caused by smoking will
Smokers have a distorted perception on when the onset of smoking-related conditions will occur, a new study in the Journal of Cognitive Psychology reports. (2018-01-18)

ADHD drugs increase brain glutamate, predict positive emotion in healthy people
The findings by Brown University scientists offer clues about how misused drugs affect healthy brains and hint at an undiscovered link between glutamate and mood. (2018-03-14)

Get better customer service by choosing your words wisely
The next time you make a complaint to your cellphone or cable company, don't get personal. (2016-12-12)

Humans will actually react pretty well to news of alien life
Hollywood has it wrong. Humans would actually react positively to news of alien life -- intelligent or microbial. (2018-02-16)

Schizophrenia: Adolescence is the game-changer
Schizophrenia may be related to the deletion syndrome. However, not everyone who has the syndrome necessarily develops psychotic symptoms. What triggers the illness? Researchers (UNIGE) have provided an initial answer after analysing several years of patients with deletion syndrome. They found that the size of the hippocampus was smaller than normal but followed the same developmental curve as in healthy subjects. Yet, when the first psychotic symptoms appear - generally in adolescence - the hippocampus atrophies dramatically. (2019-06-17)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.