Popular Positive Emotions News and Current Events | Page 2

Popular Positive Emotions News and Current Events, Positive Emotions News Articles.
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Get better customer service by choosing your words wisely
The next time you make a complaint to your cellphone or cable company, don't get personal. (2016-12-12)

Is it ok for parents to be supportive to children's negative emotions?
New research suggests that whereas mothers who are more supportive of their children's negative emotions rate their children as being more socially skilled, these same children appear less socially adjusted when rated by teachers. (2017-06-16)

A combination of personality traits might make you more addicted to social networks
As social networking companies feel the heat to create a more socially responsible and positive experience for their millions of users, new research out of Binghamton University, State University of New York explores how the interaction of personality traits can impact the likelihood of developing an addiction to social networking. (2018-03-12)

Bedside art therapy decreases pain and anxiety in patients with cancer
A brief bedside visual art intervention (BVAI) facilitated by art educators improved mood and reduced pain and anxiety in a study of inpatients with hematological cancers. (2018-04-19)

Scientists map monogamy, jealousy in the monkey mind
A recent study at the California National Primate Research Center studied jealousy in pair-bonded titi monkeys. The study was part of a larger study examining the neurobiology of pair-bonded primate species. (2017-10-19)

Cringeworthy politics: Trump sparks 'embarrassment' spikes on Twitter
A piece of not-fake-news: there has been a 45-percent increase in people tweeting about embarrassment since Donald Trump took office. In an analysis of Twitter traffic between June 2015 and June 2017, researchers revealed how the platform's users responded to Trump's actions at high-profile events. (2019-03-27)

Being HIV positive and staying on antiretroviral therapy in Africa: A systematic review
An international team of researchers have carried out a review of the evidence examining what influences people who are HIV positive to go to health services and then stay on antiretroviral drugs in Africa. (2019-01-11)

Brain's appetite regulator disrupted in obese teens
Researchers using advanced MRI to study obese adolescents found disrupted connectivity in the complex regions of the brain involved in regulating appetite, according to a new study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. (2017-11-30)

People with depression have stronger emotional responses to negative memories
People with major depressive disorder (MDD) feel more negative emotion when remembering painful experiences than people without the disorder, according to a new study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging. The study reports that people with MDD were able to control the negative emotions about as well as people unaffected by MDD, but used somewhat different brain circuits to do so. (2018-03-06)

Study: ADHD drugs do not improve cognition in healthy college students
Contrary to popular belief across college campuses, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications may fail to improve cognition in healthy students and actually can impair functioning, according to a study by researchers at the University of Rhode Island and Brown University. (2018-07-19)

Fear and hoping: Adding hope to health messages may motivate better behaviors
While fear about health concerns may grip people, adding a little hope to a message might make people more willing to take preventative actions, according to researchers. (2018-02-23)

How tails help geckos and other vertebrates make great strides
A wagging tail is often associated with dogs' emotions, but the side-to-side motion may also help them take longer strides and move faster, according to a study by researchers at the University of California, Riverside. The research was done on leopard geckos, which are ideal animals for the study of tail function because they naturally lose their tails as a defense mechanism against predators in a process called autotomy. (2017-09-07)

Crowded urban areas have fewer songbirds per person
People in crowded urban areas -- especially poor areas -- see fewer songbirds such as tits and finches, and more potential 'nuisance' birds, such as pigeons, magpies and gulls, new research shows. (2018-04-13)

Tumor-associated bacteria hitches a ride to metastatic sites
The same bacteria present in primary tumors of patients with colorectal cancer are also present in liver metastases, a new study finds. (2017-11-23)

Program for parents improves ADHD behaviors in young children
Effective early intervention is crucial for young children with ADHD, due to the unfavorable short-term and long-term outcomes associated with the disorder. (2017-10-03)

Lingering negative responses to stress linked with health a decade later
People whose negative emotional responses to stress carry over to the following day are more likely to report health problems and physical limitations later in life compared with peers who are able to 'let it go,' according to findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (2018-04-09)

MDMA users more empathetic than other drug users
Long-term MDMA users have higher levels of empathy than cannabis and other drugs users, new research suggests. (2019-02-08)

Teens who can describe negative emotions can stave off depression
Teenagers who can describe their negative emotions in precise and nuanced ways are better protected against depression than their peers who can't. That's the conclusion of a new study about negative emotion differentiation, or NED--the ability to make fine-grained distinctions between negative emotions and apply precise labels. (2019-06-28)

What makes a happy working mom?
A happy working mom feels competent in interacting with her child, experiences a sense of freedom and choice in her actions, while having a warm and affectionate relationship with her baby. She is also not too hard on herself about how she is faring as a mother. So says Katrijn Brenning of the University of Ghent in Belgium who led research that investigated what affects a working mother's sense of well-being. The study is published in Springer's Journal of Happiness Studies. (2017-12-06)

Study shows that chronic grief activates pleasure areas of the brain
Most of us experience the grief associated with the loss of a loved one at some point in our lives. New research from UCLA now suggests that people who never get over their loss, who never (2008-06-20)

Parents may help prep kids for healthier, less violent relationships
Warm, nurturing parents may pass along strategies for building and maintaining positive relationships to their kids, setting them up for healthier, less-violent romantic relationships as young adults, according to researchers. In a study, adolescents who reported a positive family climate and their parents using more effective parenting strategies tended to go on to have better relationship problem-solving skills and less-violent romantic relationships as young adults. (2018-04-27)

Study sheds new light on mechanism of breast cancer treatment resistance
A study by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute has illuminated a specific mechanism by which estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancers can become resistant to standard therapies and metastasize. (2018-02-12)

Helicopter parenting may negatively affect children's emotional well-being, behavior
It's natural for parents to do whatever they can to keep their children safe and healthy, but children need space to learn and grow on their own, without Mom or Dad hovering over them, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. The study, published in the journal Developmental Psychology, found that overcontrolling parenting can negatively affect a child's ability to manage his or her emotions and behavior. (2018-06-18)

Daily stresses can trigger heart abnormalities during everyday life
Such common emotions as tension, frustration and sadness trigger frequent and painless heart abnormalities that can lead to permanent heart damage, a research team at Duke University Medical Center has concluded (1997-05-21)

Study explores how emotions in facial expressions are understood
New research by academics at the University of East Anglia (UEA) reveals how well fearful facial expressions are perceived in peripheral vision. Although human vision has the highest resolution when we look directly at something, we see a much wider view of the visual world in our lower resolution peripheral vision. In fact, detecting signals of potential danger in our periphery - especially moving ones - is something our visual system is well adapted for. (2018-06-01)

Clothes make the woman: Less empathy towards women showing more skin
Sexualized representations, especially the emphasis of secondary sexual characteristics, can change the way we perceive an individual. An international team of researchers led by Giorgia Silani from the Faculty of Psychology at the University of Vienna has shown that empathic feelings and brain responses are reduced when we observe the emotions of sexualized women. The results of the study were recently published in the renown scientific journal Cortex. (2018-01-11)

People will desire something even more if you increase their focus on it
The relationship between desire and attention was long thought to only work in one direction: When a person desires something, they focus their attention on it. (2017-11-13)

Biological factors don't fully explain racial disparities for breast cancer type
The biological features of patients' tumors partially explained a racial disparity for women with hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer, but UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers said it didn't explain it completely. The preliminary findings were reported at the 2017 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. (2017-12-07)

Genetic counselors turn to unconventional counseling to meet demand for genetic testing
Imagine receiving genetic test results for a disease you could develop later in life without having anyone with whom to discuss your options for managing the risk. That's becoming a common occurrence as people turn to the Internet and other outlets for genetic testing without genetic counseling. In an effort to broaden accessibility to genetic counseling, researchers are exploring nonconventional counseling methods that challenge traditional approaches. (2008-03-17)

Moving pictures, feeble words: Emotional images sway people more than emotional words
New research suggests that your behavior can be influenced by subtle, barely visible images: people consume more of a beverage when exposed to positive images, such as smiling faces or cute dogs, and less when exposed to negative images, such as scowling faces or guns. However, exposure to emotionally charged words does not have the same effect. (2018-01-29)

Is the key to sparking climate action a game?
New research led by UMass Lowell and published by PLoS ONE found that 81 percent of participants in the World Climate Simulation, a role-playing game of the UN climate talks, showed increased motivation to combat climate change, even among Americans who are free market proponents, a belief strongly linked to denial of human-caused climate change in the United States. (2018-09-06)

Flourishing under an abusive boss? You may be a psychopath, study shows
According to research from Notre Dame, certain types of 'psychopaths' actually benefit and flourish under abusive bosses. (2018-01-23)

People with false-positive cancer screening results may be more likely to receive future screening
An analysis of electronic medical records indicates that patients who previously had a false-positive breast or prostate cancer screening test are more likely to obtain future recommended cancer screenings. (2018-04-23)

Your stress and mine
A new Tel Aviv University study finds that people often project their own experiences with stress onto their colleagues and employees, causing miscommunication and, often, missed opportunities. (2017-11-13)

Pre-K students benefit when teachers are supportive
New research has found that minimum standards of quality in early education classrooms, including teachers' level of education and field of study, class size, and child-to-teacher ratio were not directly related to children's learning and social development. The research was conducted among 2,349 4-year olds enrolled in 671 pre-kindergarten classrooms in 11 states. The findings suggest that focusing on high quality instructional and emotional interactions within pre-K classrooms has the potential to improve children's development. (2008-05-15)

Emotions are cognitive, not innate, researchers conclude
Emotions are not innately programmed into our brains, but, in fact, are cognitive states resulting from the gathering of information, New York University Professor Joseph LeDoux and Richard Brown, a professor at the City University of New York, conclude. (2017-02-15)

Brain activity helps explain diabetics' negative feelings, risk for depression
For millions of Americans who are obese and living with diabetes or prediabetes, feelings of sadness, anger and anxiety are often part of daily life. A new Iowa State University study suggests those negative feelings may stem from problems regulating blood sugar levels that influence emotional response in the brain. (2018-05-07)

Teaching happiness to dementia caregivers reduces their depression, anxiety
Caring for family members with dementia -- which is on the rise in the US -- causes significant emotional and physical stress that increases caregivers' risk of depression, anxiety and death. A new method of coping with that stress by teaching people how to focus on positive emotions reduced their anxiety and depression after six weeks, reports a new national study. It also resulted in better self-reported physical health and positive attitudes toward caregiving. (2019-05-02)

Recurring nightmares could reflect your daily frustrations
People who are frustrated because their basic psychological needs for autonomy, relatedness and feeling competent are not met are more likely to have a recurring bad dream and to analyze their dreams negatively. This is according to Netta Weinstein of the University of Cardiff in the UK, who is lead author of an article on dreams published in Springer's journal Motivation and Emotion. (2017-11-30)

Intervention shows promise for treating depression in preschool-aged children
Children as young as 3-years-old can be diagnosed with clinical depression. Although young children are sometimes prescribed antidepressants, a psychotherapeutic intervention is needed. Researchers adapted Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), (a validated treatment for disruptive behavioral disorders in children), by adding new emotional development content. PCIT-ED treatment resulted in significant improvements in depression for both children and their parents, suggesting PCIT-ED as a powerful and low-risk approach to the treatment of preschool depression. (2018-06-20)

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