Popular Poverty News and Current Events

Popular Poverty News and Current Events, Poverty News Articles.
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Families have high awareness of healthy eating but struggle to access good food
Low-income families have a high awareness of healthy diets but can't afford good quality and nutritious food, new research shows. (2021-02-23)

Satellite images reveal global poverty
How far have we come in achieving the UN's sustainable development goals that we are committed to nationally and internationally? Yes, it can be difficult to make a global assessment of poverty and poor economic conditions, but with an eye in the sky, researchers are able to give us a very good hint of the living conditions of populations in the world's poor countries. (2019-01-07)

The importance of children at play
Research highlights positive strengths in developmental learning for Latino children in low-income households based on their interactive play skills. (2016-01-20)

High numbers of elderly Japanese women will soon live in poverty, predicts new model
Roughly one in four elderly Japanese women will live below the poverty level in the near future, predicts a model of the Japanese pension system. Never-married and divorced women will be the most affected, with around 50 percent of these women predicted to become impoverished in the next 50 years. (2018-03-14)

Repeated periods of poverty accelerate the ageing process
People who have found themselves below the relative poverty threshold four or more times in their adult life age significantly earlier than others. This is shown in new research from the Department of Health and Medical Sciences at the University of Copenhagen. (2019-09-12)

Coral reefs suffering in Philippines despite outlawing damaging fishing practices
Some of the fishing methods used in today's small-scale fisheries are causing more damage to coral reefs than ever, a new UBC study has found. (2018-03-16)

African-Americans still disproportionately affected by HIV
African-Americans are still much more likely to be diagnosed with HIV than white Americans. A new paper on the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the African-American community shows that despite recent drops in HIV diagnoses across every population in the US, there are still great disparities between ethnic groups. The paper was led by Cato T. Laurencin of the University of Connecticut in the US and is published in Springer's Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities. (2018-06-05)

Relationship found between HIV risk and individual and community level educational status
African-American men who have sex with men (MSM) remain at heightened risk for HIV infection and account for the largest number of African-Americans living with HIV/AIDS. It has long been understood that there is a clear and persistent association between poverty, transactional sex behavior, and HIV risk. A new University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) study has investigated how educational status relates to HIV risk in this population. (2017-09-18)

Shifts to renewable energy can drive up energy poverty, PSU study finds
Efforts to shift away from fossil fuels and replace oil and coal with renewable energy sources can help reduce carbon emissions but do so at the expense of increased inequality, according to a new Portland State University study (2019-07-12)

Growing isolation of poor helps explain changes in concentrated poverty
Concentrated poverty -- neighborhoods where 40 percent of the population or more lives below the federal poverty level -- is back on the rise for all races in the United States, according to Penn State demographers. (2017-03-14)

Countries most affected by weather disasters do not spend more on weather services
Countries hit hardest by weather-related disasters do not necessarily spend more on commercial weather and climate information services that assist in preparing for these events, a new study finds. Identifying countries for which this is true and improving the design and delivery of weather and climate services in these locations could lead to better decision-making regarding risks and challenges, ultimately helping to save lives, protect infrastructure, and move people out of poverty. (2017-05-24)

The presence of sexual violence in neighborhoods erodes feelings of safety
Feelings about the frequency of rape or other forms of sexual assault in a neighborhood are significantly tied to women's -- but not men's -- perceptions of its safety, according to new research. (2018-01-15)

Health care financing system deepens poverty and income inequality
Households' payments for medical premiums, copayments and deductibles pushed more than 7 million Americans into poverty in 2014, according to a study in the American Journal of Public Health. Medical payments also dramatically worsened overall income inequality among Americans. (2018-01-18)

Better be safe than sorry: Economic optimization risks tipping of Earth system elements
# While the concept of profit maximization can be successful in bringing down costs of greenhouse gas reductions... # ... it does not suffice to avoid the tipping of critical elements in the Earth system. # Scientists used mathematical experiments to analyse three grand concepts of environmental policy. (2018-06-15)

Arthritis may be a major driver of poverty
Developing arthritis increases the risk of falling into poverty, especially for women, new research shows. (2015-09-08)

Health insurance is not assurance of healthcare
Because of high out-of-pocket expenses, Ohioans who purchase subsidized health-exchange insurance often can't afford the care they need when they need it. That is a central finding of a new study from researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. (2019-02-27)

Poverty leaves a mark on our genes
In this study, researchers found evidence that poverty can become embedded across wide swaths of the genome. They discovered that lower socioeconomic status is associated with levels of DNA methylation (DNAm) -- a key epigenetic mark that has the potential to shape gene expression -- at more than 2,500 sites, across more than 1,500 genes. (2019-04-04)

How common is food insecurity among older adults?
Food insecurity occurs when people lack access to food or go hungry due to poverty or other challenges. It remains a serious problem for many older adults. Recently, a research team from the Institute for Health Research, Kaiser Permanente, Colorado, designed a study to learn more about food insecurity and older adults. Their study was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. (2018-03-08)

Large racial and ethnic disparity in world's most common STI
In a new Johns Hopkins study, researchers have added to evidence that Trichomonas vaginalis (TV), the world's most common curable sexually transmitted infection (STI), disproportionately affects the black community. (2018-03-15)

Study details poverty, lack of health insurance among female health care workers
A study carried out by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania finds that low wages and poor benefits leave many female health care workers living below the poverty line. (2019-01-02)

Parental enrollment in Medicaid yields increase in preventive health care for children
Enrolling in Medicaid may have health benefits not only for low-income parents but also for their children, according to a Johns Hopkins analysis of over 50,000 parent-child pairs (2018-02-05)

Persistent poverty affects one in five UK children
Persistent poverty affects one in five children in the UK, and is associated with poor physical and mental health in early adolescence, suggests research published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood. (2019-06-11)

Childhood poverty can rob adults of psychological health
A large and growing body of research shows that poor kids grow up to have a host of physical problems as adults. (2017-01-03)

Poverty, ethics and discrimination: How culture plays into cognitive research
In a new paper published in Nature Human Behaviour, scientists look at how cognitive research on poverty, ethics and discrimination would be enriched by engaging more with cultural sociology. They examine three of the most prominent cognitive research models: studies of poverty focused on scarcity and cognitive bandwidth, studies of dual-process morality, and studies of biases using the implicit association test. (2017-11-29)

Study finds new insights on overdose rates, county segregation, and socioeconomics
Deaths from drug overdoses have risen dramatically in the United States over the past 20 years, and researchers seek to understand complex factors that may affect these deaths. A new study led by George Mason University's College of Health and Human Services examined drug overdose deaths at the county level. It found that socioeconomic factors and segregation may have independent effects that vary by racial and ethnic groups. (2019-07-25)

Breastfeeding gaps between white, black, and Hispanic mothers in the US
Chapman University has published research on how breastfeeding rates differ among white, black and Hispanic mothers. The study looked to see if ethnic and racial disparities in breastfeeding could be explained by differences in the use of formula in hospitals, family history of breastfeeding, mother's belief that 'breast is best'; and demographic measures including poverty, education and relationship status. (2016-07-12)

Nearly half of American children living near poverty line
Nearly half of children in the US live dangerously close to the poverty line, according to new research from the National Center for Children in Poverty. Using latest data from the American Community Survey, NCCP researchers found that while the total number of children in the US has remained about the same since 2008, more children today are likely to live in families barely able to afford their most basic needs. (2016-03-02)

Predicting poverty by satellite with detailed accuracy
By combining satellite data and sophisticated machine learning, researchers have developed a technique to estimate household consumption and income. (2016-08-18)

There can be no sustainable development without profound changes in food systems
An international group of experts, including researchers from CIRAD, is calling for profound changes in food systems in order to meet the sustainable development goals (SDGs) set by the UN in 2015, and the terms of the Paris Agreement on climate. The authors propose a four-pillar strategy. (2018-08-09)

Study: Transgender people who are denied mental health care at higher risk of self-harm
When those who identify as transgender are denied mental health care, they stand at higher risk of substance abuse as a coping method. In turn, this can increase their vulnerability to attempted suicide. (2018-05-03)

Victims of gun violence tell their stories: Everyday violence, 'feelings of hopelessness'
Invited to share their personal stories, victims of urban gun violence describe living with violence as a 'common everyday experience' and feeling abandoned by police and other societal institutions, reports a study in the November/December Journal of Trauma Nursing, official publication of the Society of Trauma Nurses. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2018-11-14)

UC Davis hosts the second Climate-Smart Agriculture Global Science Conference
The University of California, Davis, will host the second Climate-Smart Agriculture Global Science Conference on March 20-22, 2013. Co-organized by UC Davis and the World Bank, the conference will focus on science-based actions that can provide resilience for food systems despite the future uncertainty of climate change and extreme events. (2013-02-19)

New index maps relationships between poverty and accessibility in Brazil
Poor transportation availability can result in poor access to health care and employment, hence reinforcing the cycle of poverty and concerning health outcomes such as low life expectancy and high child mortality in rural Brazil. (2019-12-02)

New study examines urban-rural residence and rates of child physical abuse hospitalizations
Rural counties have higher child poverty and less access to social services. The limited existing literature is conflicting on how child physical abuse (CPA) rates may vary across the urban-rural spectrum. Understanding these population-level data could inform policy and CPA prevention strategies. (2018-05-05)

Immigrant parents report fewer adverse childhood experiences than US-born parents
A new study found immigrants reported fewer potentially health-harming adverse childhood experiences, such as abuse, violence, or divorce, than native-born Americans. The findings, which will be highlighted in an abstract presentation during the American Academy of Pediatrics 2017 National Conference & Exhibition, suggest immigrants may experience different forms of stress early in life than do those born in the United States. (2017-09-15)

Skipping breakfast linked to lower GCSE grades
Students who rarely ate breakfast on school days achieved lower GCSE grades than those who ate breakfast frequently, according to a new study in Yorkshire. (2019-11-20)

State administrative data can help identify children's adverse experiences
State administrative data can help identify children's adverse experiences. (2018-01-09)

Vulnerable populations: A special CMAJ focus
Canada's major medical journal, CMAJ, will champion the health of vulnerable populations with a special focus on groups that experience adverse health outcomes because of poverty, isolation, discrimination and other factors. (2018-03-19)

Following Presidential action, AGS renews call for bipartisan collaboration
Presidential action to alter current law risks undermining progress made by Congress, the American people, and a cadre of healthcare stakeholders to improve care access, care quality, and care costs for us all as we age, so say experts at the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) evaluating recent orders by the Trump Administration. In light of these concerns, the AGS continues to call for stakeholder input, public hearings, and ample opportunities for feedback on health reform from the American public. (2017-10-13)

COVID-19 second wave in Myanmar causes dramatic increases in poverty
New evidence combining surveys from urban and rural Myanmar and simulation analysis find COVID-19 second wave dramatically increasing poverty and food insecurity. (2020-11-24)

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