Popular Pregnant Women News and Current Events

Popular Pregnant Women News and Current Events, Pregnant Women News Articles.
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Non-invasive first trimester blood test reliably detects Down's syndrome
Cell-free fetal DNA testing, which measures the relative amount of free fetal DNA in a pregnant woman's blood, is a new screening test that indicates the risk of Down syndrome (trisomy 21), (2015-02-02)

Young breast cancer patients undergoing breast conserving surgery see improved prognosis
A new analysis indicates that breast cancer prognoses have improved over time in young women treated with breast conserving surgery. (2017-08-09)

Does MRI plus mammography improve detection of new breast cancer after breast conservation therapy?
A new article published by JAMA Oncology compares outcomes for combined mammography and MRI or ultrasonography screenings for new breast cancers in women who have previously undergone breast conservation surgery and radiotherapy for breast cancer initially diagnosed at 50 or younger. (2017-06-22)

Men place less value on care-oriented careers like nursing: UBC study
Men assign less importance to care-oriented careers than women do, possibly because men internalize different values than women, suggests new research from the University of British Columbia. (2018-08-20)

A better way to predict diabetes
An international team of researchers has discovered a simple, accurate new way to predict which women with gestational diabetes will develop type 2 diabetes after delivery. The discovery would allow health care providers to identify women at greatest risk and help motivate women to make early lifestyle changes and follow other strategies that could prevent them from developing the disease later in life. (2016-06-23)

Breast cancer statistics, 2017
Breast cancer death rates dropped 39 percent between 1989 and 2015, averting 322,600 breast cancer deaths during those 26 years. Death rates in several states are now statistically equivalent, perhaps reflecting an elimination of disparities in those states. (2017-10-03)

Energy dense foods may increase cancer risk regardless of obesity status
While there is a proven link between obesity and certain types of cancer, less is known about how the ratio of energy to food weight, otherwise known as dietary energy density (DED), contributes to cancer risk. To find out, researchers looked at DED in the diets of post-menopausal women and discovered that consuming high DED foods was tied to a 10 percent increase in obesity-related cancer among normal weight women. (2017-08-17)

Many women diagnosed with cancer have sexual health concerns
A new review published in the European Journal of Cancer Care indicates that, in women diagnosed with cancer, concerns pertaining to sexual health are diverse, multiple, and pervade all types and stages of cancer. (2017-08-11)

Risk of preterm birth reliably predicted by new test
Scientists at UC San Francisco have developed a test to predict a woman's risk of preterm birth when she is between 15 and 20 weeks pregnant, which may enable doctors to treat them early and thereby prevent severe complications later in the pregnancy. (2018-05-24)

A deep male voice helps women remember
Men take note: If you want women to remember, speak to them in a low pitch voice. Then, they may rate you as a potential mate. That's according to a new study by scientists from the University of Aberdeen, UK. Their work shows for the first time that a low masculine voice is important for both mate choice and the accuracy of women's memory. The research is published online in Springer's journal, Memory & Cognition. (2011-09-12)

Avoiding obesity and maintaining stable weight both important in preventing several obesity-related cancers in women
Avoiding obesity as well as maintaining a stable weight in middle adulthood could help prevent certain cancers in women, according to new research presented at this year's European Conference on Obesity (ECO) in Vienna, Austria (May 23-26). (2018-05-23)

Partial breast irradiation effective treatment option for low-risk breast cancer
Partial breast irradiation produces similar long-term survival rates and risk for recurrence compared with whole breast irradiation for many women with low-risk, early stage breast cancer, according to new clinical data from a national clinical trial involving researchers from The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC - James). (2019-05-16)

Study confirms beauty is in the eye of the beer holder
University of Nebraska-Lincoln psychology researchers used eye-tracking technology to determine how alcohol influences when college-age will men drop their eyes from a woman's face to other parts of her anatomy. (2017-12-21)

Physical activity in mid-life may help protect joint health during aging
In an Arthritis Care & Research analysis of 6,661 participants in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, maintaining at least low levels of physical activity throughout middle age was associated with lower prevalence and incidence of joint symptoms later in life. (2017-12-06)

Writing away the body image blues
Body dissatisfaction among women is widespread and can lead to a number of worrisome outcomes, including eating disorders, depression and anxiety. While researchers know a lot about what makes women's body image worse, they are still short on empirically supported interventions for improving women's body image. Northwestern psychology professor Renee Engeln tested the effect of three specific writing exercises on college women's body satisfaction, along with co-author Natalie G. Stern. (2018-06-21)

Surgery to remove unaffected breast in early breast cancer increases
The proportion of women in the United States undergoing surgery for early-stage breast cancer who have preventive mastectomy to remove the unaffected breast increased significantly in recent years, particularly among younger women, and varied substantially across states. (2017-03-29)

Type 2 diabetes associated with risk of aggressive breast cancer in black women
African American women with type 2 diabetes (often referred to as adult-onset diabetes) are at a greater risk for developing breast cancer. (2017-11-15)

Menopause found to worsen symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis
A recent study published in Rheumatology suggests that women with rheumatoid arthritis suffer a greater decline in physical function following menopause. After studying 8,189 women with rheumatoid arthritis, researchers found that pre-menopausal women experienced a slower physical decline than those that were post-menopausal. (2018-01-28)

Eating more foods with choline during pregnancy could boost baby's brain
When expectant mothers consume sufficient amounts of the nutrient choline during pregnancy, their offspring gain enduring cognitive benefits, a new Cornell University study suggests. (2018-01-04)

Digital technology is helping women to explore their sexuality
Women who consume Internet pornography are using technology to explore their sexuality and connect with others to discuss their sexual interests, according to research from the University of Waterloo. (2018-01-12)

Women with dementia receive less medical attention
Women with dementia have fewer visits to the GP, receive less health monitoring and take more potentially harmful medication than men with dementia, new UCL research reveals. The study, published in Age and Ageing, also found that only half of all dementia patients had a documented annual review even though GP surgeries are offered financial incentives to carry these out. (2016-12-04)

One in 4 women at sexual health clinics reports coercion over their reproductive lives
As many as one in four women attending sexual and reproductive healthcare services say they are not allowed to take control of their own reproductive lives, reveals a review of the available evidence, published today in BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health. (2019-01-07)

High numbers of elderly Japanese women will soon live in poverty, predicts new model
Roughly one in four elderly Japanese women will live below the poverty level in the near future, predicts a model of the Japanese pension system. Never-married and divorced women will be the most affected, with around 50 percent of these women predicted to become impoverished in the next 50 years. (2018-03-14)

Nearly half of women who stop smoking during pregnancy go back to smoking soon after baby is born
A major new review published today by the scientific journal Addiction reveals that in studies testing the effectiveness of stop-smoking support for pregnant women, nearly half (43 percent) of the women who managed to stay off cigarettes during the pregnancy went back to smoking within six months of the birth. (2016-03-15)

Sexism and gender inequality
Individual beliefs don't stay confined to the person who has them; they can affect how a society functions. A new study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, looks at 57 countries and finds that an individual's sexism leads to gender inequality in the society as a whole -- not surprising, but it is the largest study to find this relationship. (2011-10-28)

Maternal inflammation boosts serotonin and impairs fetal brain development in mice
Fighting the flu during pregnancy sickens a pregnant woman, but it may also put the fetus at a slightly increased risk for neurodevelopmental disorders like autism later in life. A new study in pregnant mice, published June 1 in The Journal of Neuroscience, offers a potential mechanism explaining why: Inflammation alters neurotransmitters and impairs growth of nerve cells in the developing fetal brain. (2016-05-31)

Anti-Muellerian hormone predicts IVF success
Women with a high concentration of anti-Muellerian hormone stand a better chance of giving birth after in vitro fertilization, according to a recent study accepted for publication in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2013-02-12)

Women are naturally more fit than men
Women can process oxygen more quickly than men when they start to exercise, according to a new study from the University of Waterloo. (2017-12-04)

Poor oral health may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer among African American women
African American women with poor oral health may be more likely to get pancreatic cancer (PC). (2019-03-28)

Weight loss surgery's effects on bone marrow fat and bone mass
Bone marrow fat is thought to regulate bone metabolism, and high levels of marrow fat are seen in states of low bone mass, severe underweight, and diabetes. (2017-08-09)

Can our genes help predict how women respond to ovarian cancer treatment?
New research, led by Professor Anna deFazio from the Westmead Institute and Westmead Hospital, has shown that the genes we inherit can have a significant impact on how the body processes chemotherapy drugs, which may lead to different clinical outcomes for ovarian cancer patients. (2018-02-15)

Breast density and outcomes of supplemental breast cancer screening
In a study appearing in the April 26 issue of JAMA, Elizabeth A. Rafferty, M.D., formerly of Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, and colleagues evaluated the screening performance of digital mammography combined with tomosynthesis (a type of imaging) compared with digital mammography alone for women with varying levels of breast density. (2016-04-26)

Weight loss actually possible after menopause
Talk to a woman in menopause and you're likely to hear complaints about hot flashes and an inability to lose weight, especially belly fat. A new study shows how regular exercise can help reduce weight and control bothersome symptoms such as hot flashes, even in women who previously led sedentary lifestyles. The study outcomes are being published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2017-02-15)

One in 4 elderly Australian women have dementia
At least a quarter of Australian women over 70 will develop dementia according to University of Queensland researchers. Australian policymakers previously had to rely on dementia rates from international studies, or extrapolated from clinical assessments made on small groups of people. The researchers used a technique borrowed from ecologists to provide an up-to-date estimate for dementia in the Australian population. (2017-03-17)

Breastfeeding may have long-term heart health benefits for some moms
Women with normal blood pressure during pregnancy and who breastfed their babies for at least six months following birth had better markers of cardiovascular health years later compared to women who never breastfed, based on research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session. The same benefits were not observed in women who had high blood pressure during pregnancy. (2018-02-28)

Maternal chronic disease linked to higher rates of congenital heart disease in babies
Pregnant women with congenital heart defects or type 2 diabetes have a higher risk of giving birth to babies with severe congenital heart disease and should be monitored closely in the prenatal period, according to a study published in CMAJ. (2016-10-11)

Maternal vaccination again influenza associated with protection for infants
How long does the protection from a mother's immunization against influenza during pregnancy last for infants after they are born? (2016-07-05)

New measure of equality reveals a fuller picture of male well-being
Researchers from the University of Missouri and University of Essex in the United Kingdom say a new way of measuring gender inequality is fairer to both men and women, and presents a simplified but more accurate picture of peoples' well-being than previous calculations. The new Basic Index of Gender Inequality (BIGI) focuses on three factors -- educational opportunities, healthy life expectancy and overall life satisfaction. (2019-01-03)

Research reveals risk factors for urgency urinary incontinence
In a large representative British population of individuals in their late 60s, the prevalence of urinary incontinence was 15 percent in men and 54 percent in women. (2018-03-07)

Taking paracetamol during pregnancy may reduce fertility of daughters
Taking paracetamol during pregnancy may impair the future fertility of female offspring, according to a review published in Endocrine Connections. The article reviews three separate rodent studies that all report altered development in the reproductive systems of female offspring from mothers given paracetamol during pregnancy, which may impair their fertility in adulthood. (2018-01-05)

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