Popular Preterm Birth News and Current Events

Popular Preterm Birth News and Current Events, Preterm Birth News Articles.
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Maternal gestational diabetes linked to diabetes in children
Children and youth of mothers who had gestational diabetes during pregnancy are at increased risk of diabetes themselves, according to new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-04-15)

Specific identification of chronic lung disease in premature babies
Infants born prematurely frequently develop a form of chronic lung disease known as Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia. Previously, this disease could only be diagnosed clinically and with a low degree of differentiation. Researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the University Hospital of the Ludwig-Maximilians University -- partner in the German Center for Lung Research (DZL) -- have now successfully developed a new protocol for identifying neonatal patients with the disease by the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). (2019-05-09)

Risk of preterm birth reliably predicted by new test
Scientists at UC San Francisco have developed a test to predict a woman's risk of preterm birth when she is between 15 and 20 weeks pregnant, which may enable doctors to treat them early and thereby prevent severe complications later in the pregnancy. (2018-05-24)

Black babies more likely to have nursing care missed in their NICU stay
Everybody wants a healthy life for their baby. Black babies are more likely to be born prematurely, which puts them at risk for death and developmental problems. In fact, a third of all infant deaths are preterm-related. The critical period in preterm babies' lives is when they are just born and are in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The care they receive is vital to a healthy future. (2017-09-18)

New approach to predict respiratory allergy in early childhood
A new study in EBioMedicine by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and the Medical University of Vienna, Austria, suggests that immune response in early childhood to a handful of allergen molecules can predict the onset of allergic rhinitis and asthma in adolescence. These findings could accelerate the development of preventive strategies and novel treatments for respiratory allergy in children. (2017-12-04)

Reduced exposure to bullying could reduce mental illness in extreme preemies
Researchers say meaningful interventions for extremely low birth weight survivors and their parents can improve the lives of preterm survivors and potentially prevent the development of depression and anxiety in adulthood. The study utilized the McMaster Extremely Low Birth Weight (ELBW) Cohort, which includes a group of 179 extremely low birth weight survivors and 145 normal birth weight controls born between 1977 and 1982, which has 40 years' worth of data. (2017-10-03)

Anti-Muellerian hormone predicts IVF success
Women with a high concentration of anti-Muellerian hormone stand a better chance of giving birth after in vitro fertilization, according to a recent study accepted for publication in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2013-02-12)

Premature hearts less able to cope with exercise
The hearts of people born prematurely are less able to cope with the pressures of exercise in adulthood, according to a new study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and part-funded by the British Heart Foundation. (2018-03-19)

Online intervention improves depression treatment rates in teen moms
An online program persuaded teenage mothers across 10 Kentucky counties to seek medical help for depression, highlighting an inexpensive way to increase mental health treatment rates for the vulnerable group, according to a University of Louisville study. (2018-03-16)

Association of quitting smoking during pregnancy, risk of preterm birth
This study of more than 25 million pregnant women reports on rates of smoking cessation at the start of and during pregnancy and also examines the association of quitting cigarette smoking and the risk of preterm birth. (2019-04-19)

WVU biostatistician studies link between microbiome and preterm birth
Pregnant African American women are more likely than white women to give birth prematurely, but they're underrepresented in studies of preterm birth rates. Snehalata Huzurbazar, a biostatistics professor in the West Virginia University School of Public Health, is working to change that. (2019-05-29)

45 percent of parents experience depression, anxiety and stress when newborns leave NICU
Almost half of parents whose children were admitted to Children's National Health System's neonatal intensive care unit experienced postpartum depressive symptoms, anxiety and stress when their newborns were discharged from the hospital. (2017-09-15)

When a common cold may trigger early supportive care
A new study led by Children's National Health System shows that in infants who were born severely premature, human rhinovirus infections appear to trigger airway hyper-reactivity, which leads to wheezing, hyperinflation and more severe respiratory disease. (2017-12-06)

Time between pregnancies may affect autism risk
Investigators have found a link between the amount of time between pregnancies and autism spectrum disorder in children. (2017-11-22)

New biomarker for dementia diagnosis
Medical researchers in the UK and Australia have identified a new marker which could support the search for novel preventative and therapeutic treatments for dementia. In an innovative new study, coordinated by Flinders University and University of Aberdeen, the researchers investigated the role of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), a blood marker associated with atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease in epidemiological studies, on temporal changes in cognition in an established cohort of human ageing (the 1936 Aberdeen Birth Cohort). (2020-07-10)

How to attack Africa's neonatal mortality problem
Giving birth at home is the most significant risk factor for neonatal deaths in major sections of Africa -- a continent that continues to be plagued by the highest neonatal mortality rates in the world, indicates a new study by Michigan State University scholars. (2017-06-01)

New disease gene will lead to better screening for pediatric heart disease
Cardiomyopathy, or a deterioration of the ability of the heart muscle to contract, generally leads to progressive heart failure. It is frequently inherited, and, because approximately 40 percent of children born with it are likely to die within five years of diagnosis, being able to identify its genetic basis is particularly important. Now, an international team of researchers has identified a new disease gene which is implicated in the development of severe pediatric cardiomyopathies. (2016-05-23)

Kids with headache after stroke might be at risk for another stroke
A new study has found a high incidence of headaches in pediatric stroke survivors and identified a possible association between post-stroke headache and stroke recurrence. (2019-06-12)

C-sections and gut bacteria increase risk of childhood obesity
New CHILD Study research has found that overweight and obese women are more like to have children who are overweight or obese by three years of age--and that bacteria in the gut may be partially to blame. (2018-02-22)

A candidate genetic factor for the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure has been found
Researchers at the University of Helsinki have found a genetic variation, which associates with the damage caused by maternal alcohol consumption. This genetic variation clarifies the role of genetic factors in the alcohol-induced developmental disorders and could be useful in future diagnostics. (2017-10-05)

Researchers create first 3-D mathematical model of uterine contractions
By studying the electric activity that causes uterine contractions in pregnant women, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis and their collaborators have developed a multiscale model they believe may aid in predicting preterm birth. (2016-05-31)

Improved maternity care practices decrease racial gaps in breastfeeding in the US South
A new paper published in Pediatrics links successful implementation of Baby-Friendly™ practices in the southern US with increases in breastfeeding rates and improved, evidence-based care. The changes were especially positive for African-American women. (2019-01-18)

Postpartum depression least severe form of depression in mothers
Postpartum depression -- a household term since actress Brooke Shields went public in 2005 about her struggle with it -- is indeed serious. But depression that begins before or during pregnancy is often more severe because it lasts longer and usually goes undetected until the doctor screens for it after the birth of the baby, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. (2016-06-15)

Women choose more effective contraception when cost not an issue
When cost isn't an issue, women will choose more effective, long-term methods of contraception, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. (2018-03-15)

Fossil discovery rewrites understanding of reproductive evolution
A remarkable 250-million-year-old 'terrible-headed lizard' fossil found in China shows an embryo inside the mother -- clear evidence for live birth. Head of The University of Queensland's School of Earth and Environmental Sciences and co-author Professor Jonathan Aitchison said the fossil unexpectedly provided the first evidence for live birth in an animal group previously thought to exclusively lay eggs. (2017-02-14)

Preeclampsia screening method found superior to current tests
New research highlights a more accurate way to screen for preeclampsia in pregnant women than currently recommended methods. (2018-03-14)

How does the immune system develop in the first days of life?
Researchers highlight the anti-inflammatory response taking place after birth and designed to shield the newborn from infection. Early protection is ensured by the innate immunity through the rapid development of the complement pathway during the first week after birth. (2020-10-22)

Birth weight and social class linked to educational achievement
Birth weight and social class at birth have a strong influence on cognitive (mental) function in children, say researchers in this week's BMJ. (2002-08-08)

Newborn Immune Activation May Have Long-Term Negative Impact on Brain FunctionNewborn immune activation may have long-term negative impact on brain function
McLean neuroscientists have found that even a brief episode of immune system activation within days of birth can cause persistent changes in sleep patterns concurrent with increases in epilepsy-like brain activity -- a combination of symptoms common in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental conditions. (2018-01-12)

Premature infants at greater risk of SIDS
Premature infants still have a greater risk compared to full-term babies of dying of SIDS and other sleep-related infant deaths despite recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics that hospital NICU's provide more safe infant sleep education to parents before they go home. (2017-06-26)

Scientists find new evidence about how to prevent worsening pneumonia
Sodium channels in the cells that line the tiny capillaries in our lungs play an important role in keeping those capillaries from leaking and potentially worsening conditions like pneumonia, scientists report. (2017-09-05)

Diabetes, but not diabetes drug, linked to poor pregnancy outcomes
New research indicates that pregnant women with pre-gestational diabetes who take metformin are at a higher risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes -- such as major birth defects and pregnancy loss -- than the general population, but their increased risk is not due to metformin but diabetes. (2017-12-20)

Education and income determine whether women participate in cervical screening
The impression that foreign-born women in Sweden more often are excluded from gynecological cancer screening needs to be reconsidered. A study from Sahlgrenska Academy, published in the journal PLOS One, makes it clear that foreign-born women participate to the same extent as women born in Sweden with a corresponding educational level and income. (2018-01-11)

The Lancet: Conceiving within a year of stillbirth does not increase risks for next pregnancy
The results are from the first large-scale observational study to investigate the interval between stillbirth and subsequent pregnancy, including almost 14,500 births in women from Australia, Finland and Norway who had a stillbirth in their previous pregnancy. The findings are published in The Lancet. (2019-02-28)

Health indicators for newborns of breast cancer survivors may vary by cancer type
In a study published in the International Journal of Cancer, researchers from the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center analyzed health indicators for children born to young breast cancer survivors in North Carolina. (2018-02-05)

What causes women to stop breastfeeding early?
A recent systematic literature review has investigated potential sociodemographic, physical, mental, and social factors that may cause breastfeeding mothers to stop breastfeeding before infants reach 6 months of age. (2017-06-07)

Women with intellectual and developmental disabilities have almost double the rate of repeat pregnancy
Women with intellectual and developmental disabilities have nearly double the rate of having another baby within a year of delivering compared to women without such disabilities, according to a new study published in CMAJ. (2018-08-13)

Asthma in infant boys may eventually be preventable
A new University of Alberta study shows that the family risk for asthma -- typically passed from moms to babies -- may not be a result of genetics alone: it may also involve the microbes found in a baby's digestive tract. (2017-11-27)

Protection against Malaria: A matter of balance
A balanced production of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines at two years of age protects against clinical malaria in early childhood, according to a study led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by ''la Caixa'' Foundation. The results also indicated that early exposure to the parasite does not affect the risk of developing the disease, although it could affect the parasite-specific immune response later in life. (2018-11-14)

NIH scientists find that breast cancer protection from pregnancy starts decades later
In general, women who have had children have a lower risk of breast cancer compared to women who have never given birth. However, new research has found that moms don't experience this breast cancer protection until many years later and may face elevated risk for more than 20 years after their last pregnancy. (2018-12-14)

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