Popular Preventive Medicine News and Current Events

Popular Preventive Medicine News and Current Events, Preventive Medicine News Articles.
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Study finds COVID risk communication targeting younger adults may have biggest impact
A study of adults in the United States finds that - broadly speaking - the older you are, the more concerned you are about COVID-19, and the more steps you take to reduce your risk from COVID-19. The study suggests that the biggest boost in risk reduction would stem from communication efforts aimed at raising awareness of COVID-19 risks among U.S. adults under the age of 40. (2021-02-23)

High-deductible health care plans curb both cost and usage, including preventive care
A team of researchers based at IUPUI has conducted the first systematic review of studies examining the relationship between high-deductible health care plans and the use of health care services. They found these plans reduce both the cost and the use of health care services, according to an article published in the October issue of the journal Health Affairs. (2017-10-03)

US Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement on behavioral counseling to prevent skin cancer
The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends behavioral counseling to help reduce the risk of skin cancer from ultraviolet (UV) radiation in persons ages 6 months to 24 years with fair skin types. (2018-03-20)

Want to quit smoking? Partner up
Kicking the habit works best in pairs. That's the main message of a study presented today at EuroPrevent 2019, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). 'Quitting smoking can be a lonely endeavor,' said study author Magda Lampridou, of Imperial College London, UK. (2019-04-12)

Preventive drug therapy may increase right-sided heart failure risk in patients who receive heart devices
Patients treated preemptively with drugs to reduce the risk of right-sided heart failure after heart device implantation may experience the opposite effect and develop heart failure and post-operative bleeding more often than patients not receiving the drugs. The findings highlight the need for a prospective study of the role of the routine use of this approach before left-ventricular assist device implantation. (2019-06-11)

Eye conditions provide new lens screening for Alzheimer's disease
A study of 3,877 randomly selected patients found a significant link between three degenerative eye diseases -- age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma -- and Alzheimer' disease. (2018-08-08)

Where you live could determine risk of heart attack, stroke or dying of heart disease
People living in parts of Ontario with better access to preventive health care had lower rates of cardiac events compared to residents of regions with less access, found a new study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2017-04-03)

New approach to predict respiratory allergy in early childhood
A new study in EBioMedicine by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and the Medical University of Vienna, Austria, suggests that immune response in early childhood to a handful of allergen molecules can predict the onset of allergic rhinitis and asthma in adolescence. These findings could accelerate the development of preventive strategies and novel treatments for respiratory allergy in children. (2017-12-04)

Employers who recognize the impact of migraine may help to improve workplace productivity
Up to $28.7 billion in annual direct and indirect healthcare costs can be attributed to migraine-related losses in productivity. Data presented today at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Neurology in Boston, Mass., reinforced the benefit for employers to acknowledge and assess the impact of migraine to potentially improve workplace productivity. The data also suggested workers consider potential treatment options that may help them prevent or reduce the frequency of migraine attacks. (2007-05-03)

Public health experts celebrate 30 years of CDC's prevention research solutions for communities with health disparities
It has been 30 years since CDC created the Prevention Research Centers (PRC) Program, currently a network of 26 academic institutions across the US dedicated to moving new discoveries into the communities that need them. Marking this milestone, key members of the PRC Network community share their insights and commentaries to provide an insiders' perspective on the past, present, and future of the PRC Program in a special supplement to the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. (2017-02-16)

For city kids with asthma, telemedicine and in-school care cut ER visits in half
Urban children with asthma who received a combination of telemedicine support and school-based medication therapy were less than half as likely to need an emergency room or hospital visit for their asthma. (2018-01-09)

Fake social media accounts can be hazardous to your health
Fake social media accounts already have a reputation of swaying political discourse, but a Keck School of Medicine of USC researcher says these automated accounts are even more dangerous -- they can be bad for your health. USC researchers focused on how these bots promoted the notion that using electronic cigarettes helps people stop smoking, a conclusion not definitively supported by research. (2017-12-20)

Late dinner and no breakfast is a killer combination
People who skip breakfast and eat dinner near bedtime have worse outcomes after a heart attack. That's the finding of research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). (2019-04-18)

Associations between longitudinal beverage intakes and adolescent caries
At the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Teresa A. Marshall, University of Iowa College of Dentistry, Iowa City, presented an oral session titled 'Associations Between Longitudinal Beverage Intakes and Adolescent Caries.' The AADR/CADR Annual Meeting is in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., USA from March 21-24, 2018. (2018-03-24)

Racism is a public health issue
Racism may be important in the development of illness and countering it should be considered a public health issue, argues a senior psychiatrist in this week's BMJ. (2003-01-09)

Vaping doubles risk of smoking cigarettes for teens
Teenagers who try e-cigarettes double their risk for smoking tobacco cigarettes, according to a new study. The study -- from the University of Waterloo and the Wake Forest School of Medicine -- found that students in grades seven to 12 who had tried an e-cigarette are 2.16 times more likely to be susceptible to cigarette smoking. (2017-09-18)

Exercise to prevent falls recommended for older adults at increased risk for falls
For adults 65 years or older who are at increased risk of falling, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends exercise, such as supervised individual and group classes and physical therapy, to prevent falls, and that clinicians selectively check older adults' risks for falls and then offer tailored interventions that address those specific risks. The USPSTF recommends against vitamin D supplementation. (2018-04-17)

Tailored preventive oral health intervention improves dental health among elderly
A tailored preventive oral health intervention significantly improved the cleanliness of teeth and dentures among elderly home care clients. In addition, functional ability and cognitive function were strongly associated with better oral hygiene, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The study is part of a larger intervention study, NutOrMed, and the findings were published in the Age and Aging journal. (2017-03-01)

New study highlights benefits of weekly nutrition classes to improve type 2 diabetes
Prescriptions are not enough -- diet changes and nutrition education make the difference in people with diabetes, according to a study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. (2018-04-06)

Self-sampling identifies twice as many women at risk of cervical cancer
Using self-sampling followed by HPV testing, more than twice as many women at risk of developing cervical cancer could be identified and offered preventive treatment. This is shown by researchers at Uppsala University in the first randomised study in the world comparing two ways of identifying cervical cancer, published today in the British Journal of Cancer. (2018-02-15)

Vitamin D levels in the blood linked to cardiorespiratory fitness
Vitamin D levels in the blood are linked to cardiorespiratory fitness, according to a study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a publication of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). (2018-10-30)

Protection against Malaria: A matter of balance
A balanced production of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines at two years of age protects against clinical malaria in early childhood, according to a study led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by ''la Caixa'' Foundation. The results also indicated that early exposure to the parasite does not affect the risk of developing the disease, although it could affect the parasite-specific immune response later in life. (2018-11-14)

Maryland's 2011 alcohol sales tax reduced alcohol sales, study suggests
Maryland's 2011 increase in the alcohol sales tax appears to have led to fewer purchases of beer, wine and liquor in the state, suggesting reduced alcohol use, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research indicates. (2016-04-11)

Racial disparities in asthma related to health care access, environmental factors
In the United States, racial disparities in asthma prevalence, morbidity and mortality can largely be explained by looking at socioeconomic and environmental factors, such as access to healthcare. The findings highlight the potential of targeted interventions, such as mobile asthma clinic programs and joint programs with schools where asthma prevalence is high. (2019-01-11)

Bariatric surgery prolongs lifespan in obese
Obese, middle-age men and women who had bariatric surgery have half the death rate of those who had traditional medical treatment over a 10-year period, reports a study that answers questions about the long-term risk of the surgery. Previous studies looking at this question were indefinite because follow-up data was limited due to high costs and patients dropping out. (2018-01-16)

Widely used malaria treatment to prevent malaria in pregnant women
A global team of researchers, led by a research team at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM), are calling for a review of drug-based strategies used to prevent malaria infections in pregnant women, in areas where there is widespread resistance to existing antimalarial medicines. (2019-03-25)

Cavity prevention approach effectively reduces tooth decay
A scientifically based approach that includes a tooth-decay risk assessment, aggressive preventive measures and conservative restorations can dramatically reduce decay in community dental practices, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco. (2018-01-22)

Evidence insufficient regarding screening for obstructive sleep apnea
The US Preventive Services Task Force has concluded that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for obstructive sleep apnea in asymptomatic adults (including adults with unrecognized symptoms). The report appears in the Jan. 24/31 issue of JAMA. (2017-01-24)

Women more likely to use other preventive health services after mammography
Medicare beneficiaries who undergo breast cancer screening with mammography are more likely than unscreened women to undergo other preventive health services like screening for cervical cancer and osteoporosis, according to a major new study. (2018-06-05)

Preventing and treating acute chest syndrome in children with sickle cell disease
Acute chest syndrome (ACS), a potentially severe lung complication of sickle cell disease, increases a child's risk of respiratory failure, chronic lung disease, and prolonged hospitalization if not recognized early and treated effectively. (2018-01-05)

Study finds quality of care in VA health care system compares well to other settings
The quality of health care provided to US military veterans in Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities compares favorably with the treatment and services delivered outside the VA. In fact, VA facilities perform better in some cases when it comes to the safety and effectiveness of the treatment provided. This is according to review that was led by Dr. Courtney Gidengil of the RAND Corporation in the US, and appears in Springer's Journal of General Internal Medicine. (2016-07-18)

Access and utilization of dental services for Medicaid children 2013-2015
At the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Natalia I. Chalmers, D.D.S., Ph.D. of the DentaQuest Institute, Westborough, Mass., presented an oral session titled 'Access and Utilization of Dental Services for Medicaid Children 2013-2015.' The AADR/CADR Annual Meeting is in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., USA from March 21-24, 2018. (2018-03-23)

New guideline for screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms
A new screening guideline from the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (CTFPHC) for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), which cause approximately 1244 deaths every year in Canada, recommends one-time ultrasonography screening for men aged 65 to 80 years. (2017-09-11)

Recent study in Oregon reveals public considers alcohol more harmful than marijuana
A new study, led by researchers at RTI International, surveyed more than 1,900 adults in Oregon prior to the legalization of marijuana in the state and found that more than half (52.5 percent) consider alcohol to be more harmful than marijuana while few (7.5 percent) believe marijuana is more harmful to a person's health. (2018-02-07)

Severely obese people can reduce risk of atrial fibrillation with exercise
New research suggests that exercise can have a moderating effect on the risk of developing atrial fibrillation. (2018-08-07)

Study links changes in oral microbiome with metabolic disease/risk for dental disease
A team of scientists from The Forsyth Institute and the Dasman Diabetes Institute in Kuwait have found that metabolic diseases, which are characterized by high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and obesity -- leads to changes in oral bacteria and puts people with the disease at a greater risk for poor oral health. (2017-03-01)

Oral vitamin D may help prevent some skin infections
A study led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, suggests that use of oral vitamin D supplements bolsters production of a protective chemical normally found in the skin, and may help prevent skin infections that are a common result of atopic dermatitis, the most common form of eczema. (2008-10-06)

USPSTF recommendation statement on screening for prostate cancer
The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that men 55 to 69 who are interested in screening talk to their doctors about potential benefits and harms of screening for prostate cancer before deciding whether to undergo periodic prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based screening. The USPSTF recommends against PSA-based screening for men 70 and older. (2018-05-08)

Adults with disabilities screened less often for colorectal cancer
Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer in the United States, with nearly 135,000 cases reported in 2016. The likelihood of surviving colorectal cancer is strongly related to the stage in which it is diagnosed. Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine found that individuals with certain disabilities are less likely to receive recommended preventive screenings. The researchers hope the finding will lead to targeted interventions and increased awareness. (2017-03-29)

Statins linked to higher diabetes risk
Individuals who take cholesterol-lowering statins may be at higher risk for developing high blood sugar levels, insulin resistance, and eventually type 2 diabetes, according to an analysis published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. (2019-03-06)

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