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Popular Privacy News and Current Events

Popular Privacy News and Current Events, Privacy News Articles.
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Artificial intelligence advances threaten privacy of health data
Advances in artificial intelligence, including activity trackers, smartphones and smartwatches, threaten the privacy of people's health data, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley. (2019-01-03)
New UTSA study shows wearable technology also contributes to distracted driving
A new study by Murtuza Jadliwala, assistant professor of computer science at The University of Texas at San Antonio, examines wearable technology and whether it affects drivers' concentration. (2018-04-23)
Rural dementia -- we need to talk
Research carried out by Plymouth University into the experience of dementia in farming and farming families, and its impact on their businesses and home lives, has identified four areas of concern which need to be addressed if dementia in the countryside is to be managed. (2017-01-11)
McLean researchers uncover security issues with health apps for dementia patients
In a recent paper, a team of McLean Hospital researchers reported that many health apps designed to assist dementia patients and their caregivers have inadequate security policies or lack security policies altogether. (2017-08-21)
Digital technology is helping women to explore their sexuality
Women who consume Internet pornography are using technology to explore their sexuality and connect with others to discuss their sexual interests, according to research from the University of Waterloo. (2018-01-12)
Raising transparency in the online advertising ecosystem
The online advertising business, led by companies like Google or Facebook, generated over $200 billion revenue in 2017, with an interanual growth over 15 percent. (2018-03-16)
From healthcare to warfare: How to regulate brain technology
Ethicists from the University of Basel have outlined a new biosecurity framework specific to neurotechnology. (2018-01-18)
Should all patients be asked about their sexual orientation?
In late 2017, NHS England released guidelines recommending that health professionals ask all patients about their sexual orientation in order to improve services for non-heterosexual patients, but should they? (2018-01-17)
Can your brain testify against you?
A review of applications of neuroscience in law, or 'neurolaw,' brings into question the ethical implications that come with the possibility of a person unwillingly revealing their own guilt. (2018-02-02)
The origin and future of spam and other online intrusions
What does the future of digital spam look like, what risks could it pose to our personal security and privacy, and what can we do to fight it? (2019-07-25)
Study examines privacy policies, data sharing of popular apps for depression, smoking cessation
This study looked at the privacy practices of popular apps for depression and smoking cessation. (2019-04-19)
Secure payment without leaving a trace
Wether paying for public transport via a smartphone app or wether using a prepaid card for the public swimming pool: Many people open 'electronic purses' every day. (2017-10-25)
Ultrasound-firewall for mobile phones
Mobile phones and tablets through so-called audio tracking, can be used by means of ultrasound to unnoticeably track the behaviour of their users: for example, viewing certain videos or staying in specific rooms and places. (2018-05-24)
Protecting patient privacy the new fashioned way
In a study published in the September-October issue of the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, Jeff Friedlin, D.O., of the Regenstrief Institute Inc. and the Indiana University School of Medicine, writes about the Medical De-identification System (MeDS), a highly accurate and speedy computer software program he has developed and successfully tested for de-identifying patient information while retaining the essential data key to medical research. (2008-09-25)
More dentists to discuss risks of HPV-related cancers with their patients
The dental community is working to strengthen HPV prevention efforts, helping reduce the prevalence of oropharyngeal cancers. (2018-01-10)
Heartbeat could be used as password to access electronic health records
Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have devised a new way to protect personal electronic health records using a patient's own heartbeat. (2017-01-18)
AI researchers design 'privacy filter' for your photos
As concerns over privacy and data security on social networks grow, U of T Engineering researchers led by Professor Parham Aarabi and graduate student Avishek Bose have created an algorithm to dynamically disrupt facial recognition systems. (2018-05-31)
The privacy risks of compiling mobility data
A new study by MIT researchers finds that the growing practice of compiling massive, anonymized datasets about people's movement patterns is a double-edged sword: While it can provide deep insights into human behavior for research, it could also put people's private data at risk. (2018-12-07)
Is it ethical to use genealogy data to solve crimes?
Despite the popularity of online genealogy services, it is unclear whether users understand that their genetic information is available for forensic purposes. (2018-05-28)
The benefits & dangers when genetic testing companies partner with orphan drug developers
Pharmaceutical companies developing Orphan Drugs are increasingly partnering with direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing firms to identify individuals with rare diseases, in a trend that is raising concerns related to privacy, drug costs, and rising healthcare-related financial burden for consumers. (2017-09-27)
Privacy policies affect quantity of genetic testing
Different types of privacy laws in US states produce markedly different effects on the willingness of patients to have genetic testing done, according to a new study co-authored by an MIT professor. (2017-12-12)
Emergency contact information helps researchers branch out family tree
A collaborative team of researchers from three major academic medical centers in New York City is showing that emergency contact information, which is included in individuals' electronic health records (EHRs), can be used to generate family trees. (2018-05-17)
Advertising in kids' apps more prevalent than parents may realize
Child consumer advocacy groups plan to file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission about the study's findings. (2018-10-30)
Understanding veteran privacy rules could help improve counseling strategies
Now, a researcher at the University of Missouri has found that veterans tend to disclose wartime information on a strict need-to-know basis, and that therapists treating veterans can improve their counseling strategies if they seek to understand veteran privacy rules that are formed by military culture. (2018-05-16)
System allows surveillance cameras to 'talk' to the public through individual smartphones
Purdue University researchers have created a technology that allows public cameras to send personalized messages to people without compromising their privacy. (2018-06-14)
Fighting terror online
Online terrorism is the use of new technology to elicit fear and panic in society. (2008-03-19)
'Smart' dresser prototype guides people with dementia in getting dressed
A new study published in JMIR Medical Informatics describes how a 'smart home' prototype may help people with dementia dress themselves through automated assistance, enabling them to maintain independence and dignity and providing their caregivers with a much-needed respite. (2018-05-01)
DNA sequencing tools lack robust protections against cybersecurity risks
A new study analyzing the security hygiene of common, open-source DNA processing programs finds evidence of poor computer security practices used throughout the field. (2017-08-10)
Bitcoin wallet devices vulnerable to security hacks, study shows
Devices used to manage accounts using Bitcoin could be improved to provide better protection against hackers, according to research by University of Edinburgh scientists. (2018-01-23)
New AI method keeps data private
New machine learning method developed by researchers at the University of Helsinki, Aalto University and Waseda University of Tokyo can use for example data on cell phones while guaranteeing data subject privacy. (2017-12-20)
Social media data use needs tighter research controls, experts say
Information shared on social media is being regularly used in research projects without users' consent, a study from the University of Edinburgh suggests. (2017-10-30)
Amid outcry over Facebook's privacy issues, new approaches are needed to protect consumers
Facebook's current privacy crisis and questions about how Google gathers, uses and stores our personal information demonstrate an urgent need to review and replace inadequate and outdated ways to regulate data and information, according to research from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business. (2018-04-05)
One in 5 adults secretly access their friends' Facebook accounts
Most people are concerned about the prospect of their social media accounts being hacked, but a new University of British Columbia study finds that it's actually people we know who frequently access our accounts without our permission. (2017-01-19)
Older users like to snoop on Facebook, but worried others might snoop on them
Older adults are drawn to Facebook so they can check out pictures and updates from family and friends, but may resist using the site because they are worried about who will see their own content, according to a team of researchers. (2017-08-17)
Hospital privacy curtains may harbor dangerous germs: New study
Without timely intervention, privacy curtains in hospitals can become breeding grounds for resistant bacteria, posing a threat to patient safety, according to new research published in the American Journal of Infection Control (AJIC), the journal of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). (2018-09-27)
Experts call for ethics rules to protect privacy, free will, as brain implants advance
In a new essay in Nature, Columbia neuroscientist Rafael Yuste joins more than two dozen researchers in calling for ethical guidelines to cover the evolving use of computer hardware and software to enhance or restore human capabilities. (2017-11-13)
Sex workers need workplace regulations to improve safety: Study
Canada's sex workers, many of whom work indoors, are enterprising and vigilant when it comes to protecting themselves against exploitation, assault or robbery. (2018-03-21)
Keeping children safe in the 'Internet of Things' age
Children need protection when using programmable Internet computing devices -- and Lancaster University scientists have drawn up new guidelines to help designers build in safeguards. (2019-06-21)
Are hospitals improperly disposing of personal health information?
A substantial amount of personal information, most of it personal health information, was found in the recycling at five hospitals in Toronto, Canada, despite policies in place for protection of personal information. (2018-03-20)
Thousands of mobile apps for children might be violating their privacy
Thousands of the most popular apps and games available, mostly free of charge, in the Google Play Store, make potentially illegal tracking of children's use habits, according to a large-scale international study co-authored by Narseo Vallina-Rodriguez, a researcher at the IMDEA Networks Institute in Madrid and ICSI, the International Computer Science Institute at the University of California, Berkeley (USA). (2018-04-24)
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