Popular Psychotherapy News and Current Events

Popular Psychotherapy News and Current Events, Psychotherapy News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 13 | 498 Results
New study on the placebo effect and antidepressants in children and adolescents
Although the clinical efficacy of antidepressants in children and adolescents is proven, it is frequently accompanied by side effects. In addition, the influence of the placebo effect on the efficacy of antidepressants is unclear. A meta-analysis of data from over 6,500 patients has now shown that, although antidepressants are more effective than placebos, the difference is minor and varies according to the type of mental disorder. (2017-09-15)

Probiotics could help millions of patients suffering from bipolar disorder
About 3 million people in the US are diagnosed every year with bipolar disorder, a psychiatric condition characterized by dramatic shifts in mood from depression to mania. Currently, the standard treatment includes a combination of psychotherapy and prescription medications such as mood stabilizers and antipsychotics. (2018-12-13)

Learning in the absence of external feedback
Rewards act as external factors that influence and reinforce learning processes. Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have now been able to show that the brain can produce its own learning signals in cases where no such external feedback is available. A report on the mechanisms underlying these self-generated feedback signals has been published in the current volume of eLife, and shows clear parallels between the neurobiological processes involved in learning based on external and self-generated feedback. (2016-04-06)

Study finds only one-third of patients diagnosed with depression start treatment
Despite the wide availability of effective treatments for depression and a growing effort nationwide to detect and begin treating depression during primary care visits, only about one-third of individuals newly diagnosed with depression start treatment, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published today in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. (2018-02-08)

Brief psychotherapy benefits women caring for children with severe health issues
Brief cognitive behavioral therapy significantly improved the mental health of women overwhelmed by caring for children with severe chronic health conditions, researchers at the University of Louisville have found. After five therapy sessions, study participants reported significantly decreased depressive symptoms, negative thinking and chronic stressors, and experienced improved sleep quality, according to Lynne Hall, Dr.P.H., R.N., associate dean of research and professor at the UofL School of Nursing. (2018-09-14)

Non-suicidal self-injury in adolescents: The prevalence in Germany is high
In the current issue of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International, Paul L. Plener and his coauthors from Ulm University Hospital present the latest evidence on non-suicidal self-injury in adolescents and also discuss guideline conform treatment (Dtsch Arztebl Int 2018; 115: 23-30). https://www.aerzteblatt.de/pdf.asp?id=195729 (2018-02-02)

Bungee jumping for science
Immediately before a person decides to launch themselves off a bridge for a bungee jump, there is a measurable increase in their brain activity. This can be recorded nearly one second before the person makes the conscious decision to jump. Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have, for the first time, succeeded in measuring this 'Bereitschaftspotential' (readiness potential) outside a laboratory and under extreme conditions. Results from this research have been published in Scientific Reports*. (2019-02-28)

New hope for patients with depression and anxiety
There is a strong link between depression and anxiety disorders and autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT), a chronic thyroid condition affecting approximately 10 percent of the population. Scientists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now proven that special treatment could help many sufferers, especially women. (2018-05-15)

The influence of stimulants on performance when playing chess
High-performance tournament chess players can actually enhance the highly complex cognitive functions they require by taking substances such as the CNS stimulant methylphenidate or the wakefulness promoter modafinil and thus win more chess matches -- unless they are under time pressure. (2017-03-06)

Developmental psychotherapy for antisocial adolescents
Working with young offenders is considered difficult activity and often ineffective. Most popular programs focus on behavior control, in the assumption that behavioral problems are a 'lack of something.' Whereas, a developmental approach understands antisocial behavior results from intentions, values and goals that need thorough consideration. A developmental understanding of delinquent youth combines with psychoanalytically informed perspective on treatment in a program carried out successfully in Italy for past 20 years. (2018-05-18)

Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy affects self-criticism and self-assurance in individuals with depression
Findings from a recent study of individuals with depression suggest that Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) can improve how patients feel about themselves in difficult situations in ways that may help protect against relapse of depressive symptoms. The findings are published in Counselling and Psychotherapy Research. (2021-01-06)

60 percent of psychotherapy clients felt therapy didn't end on time
Sixty percent of private practice dynamically oriented psychotherapy clients felt that their therapy either lasted too long or ended too soon, according to recent research conducted by Professor David Roe of the University of Haifa. (2008-01-09)

Brain activity can predict success of depression treatment
McLean Hospital and Harvard Medical School researchers believe they have uncovered a method that could be useful in predicting a depressed patient's treatment prognosis, prior to starting treatment. (2018-04-11)

Progress in posttraumatic stress disorder --Increased understanding points to new approaches for PTSD prevention and treatment
Recent advances in scientific understanding of how posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) develops and persists may lead to more effective treatment and even prevention of this debilitating disorder, according to the May/June special issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry, published by Wolters Kluwer. (2018-05-09)

LSD alters perception via serotonin receptors
Researchers from UZH have discovered how the perception of meaning changes in the brain under the influence of LSD. The serotonin 2A receptors are responsible for altered perception. This finding will help develop new courses of pharmacotherapy for psychiatric disorders such as depression, addictions or phobias. (2017-01-26)

McLean successfully integrates spirituality and religion with mental health treatment
McLean Hospital clinicians describe the success of the hospital's Spiritual Psychotherapy for Inpatient, Residential & Intensive Treatment (SPIRIT) program. (2019-09-19)

New hope for an 'untreatable' mental illness
For the first time, a major outcome study has shown that a high percentage of patients with borderline personality disorder can achieve full recovery across the complete range of symptoms. The controlled study, appearing in a recent issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry published by the American Medical Association, shows that a new approach -- schema therapy -- is more than twice as effective as a widely practiced psychodynamic approach, transference focused psychotherapy. (2006-10-10)

Depression in black adolescents requires different treatment
Black adolescents express depressive symptoms differently than people from other age and racial groups, requiring that clinicians take this into account when developing treatment plans, according to a new study led by a Rutgers University-Camden researcher. (2018-01-05)

How to treat depression in prison -- and why it matters
Of the 4 million prisoners released each year, 23 percent have suffered from major depressive disorder. Due to resource shortages, many go without adequate treatment while in prison. Oftentimes they rejoin society in worse mental shape than before their incarceration - which could be prevented with the right care. A team led by Michigan State University has found a cost-effective way to improve mental health in prisons. (2019-02-21)

Ground-breaking research on the side effects of therapy
While many people who suffer from depression and anxiety are helped by seeing a psychologist, others don't get better or actually get worse. Psychological treatment can have negative side effects, like any medicine. This unexplored territory is the focus of a new dissertation out of Stockholm University. (2017-02-07)

Fix and prevent health disparities in children by supporting mom, and dad
According to the recent National Academies report on health disparities in children, one of the most important factors in preventing and addressing disparities is the well-being of the child's primary caregiver. This finding is based on decades of developmental psychology research from Arizona State University scientists and others. When the primary caregiver is supported, the caregiver-child attachment can buffer against adversities like poverty, trauma and chronic stress. (2019-09-05)

Self-help book works to combat burnout and stress -- without a therapist
Around a third of all employees find their work stressful. Interventions for stress and burnout are available, but often not accessible for many employees. A self-help book based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) has the potential to reduce burnout, stress and symptoms of depression - without any therapist contact. Researchers from the University of Basel have reported these findings in the scientific journal Work & Stress. (2017-11-27)

Reducing sessions of trauma-focused psychotherapy does not affect effectiveness
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients treated with as few as five sessions of trauma-focused psychotherapy find it equally effective as receiving 12 sessions. (2018-01-17)

Even open-label placebos work -- if they are explained
For some medical complaints, open-label placebos work just as well as deceptive ones. As psychologists from the University of Basel and Harvard Medical School report in the journal Pain, the accompanying rationale plays an important role when administering a placebo. (2017-09-26)

Easing refugees' trauma with psychotherapy
They are suffering from nightmares, flashbacks, depression, or anxiety disorders: refugees coming to Germany from conflict areas are frequently traumatized. 'Realistic estimates state that up to 40 per cent of refugees have mental problems. Hence, for the period since 2015, we are talking about several hundred thousand people who are in real need of psychological support,' says Professor Dr. Frank Neuner from Bielefeld University. (2017-10-27)

LSD treatment for alcoholism gets new look
For the past five years, Dr. Erika Dyck has been unearthing some intriguing facts related to a group of pioneering psychiatrists who worked in Saskatchewan, Canada in the '50s and '60s. Among other things, the University of Alberta history of medicine professor has found records of the psychiatrists' research that indicate a single dose of the hallucinogenic drug LSD can be an effective treatment for alcoholism. Her findings are published this month in the journal Social History of Medicine. (2006-10-06)

In patients with heart failure, anxiety and depression linked to worse outcomes
Symptoms of depression and anxiety are present in about one-third of patients with heart failure - and these patients are at higher risk of progressive heart disease and other adverse outcomes, according to a review and update in the July/August issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2018-07-06)

What happens when nerve cells stop working?
Micro-failures in brain functioning occur in conditions such as depression and dementia. In most cases, the lost capacity will return after a while. However, consequential damage will often remain so that the functional capability can only be restored through lengthy treatment -- if at all. For this reason, researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg have been investigating what happens during such breakdown phases and looking at possible ways of preventing damage and speeding up the healing processes. (2017-09-27)

Can psychedelic drugs heal?
Many people think of psychedelics as relics from the hippie generation or something taken by ravers and music festival-goers, but they may one day be used to treat disorders ranging from social anxiety to depression, according to research presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association. (2018-08-09)

Exploring the neuroscience of behavioral therapy in rats
Psychotherapy may improve symptoms of psychiatric disorders by increasing activity in the medial prefrontal cortex, suggests a study of rats exposed to chronic stress. The research, published in JNeurosci, is a step toward understanding how the brain processes influenced by behavioral therapy may be targeted to improve treatment. (2018-01-15)

Post-traumatic stress disorder: alleviating flashbacks by playing Tetris
A behavioural intervention procedure including the computer game Tetris could help people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to alleviate involuntarily recurring visual memories of traumatic experiences. This is the conclusion reached by a team from Ruhr-Universität Bochum together with a researcher from the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden following a study of 20 inpatients with PTSD. Following an intervention involving playing Tetris, the number of flashbacks for the stressful events decreased. (2019-01-08)

Getting a good night's sleep and feeling better could be all in your head
For the thousands of peri- and postmenopausal women who struggle to sleep and battle depression, help can't come soon enough. Although physical changes during the menopause transition are often the cause of these problems, a new study from the University of Texas suggests that cognitive behavioral therapy might provide the relief these women seek. The study results will be presented during The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, Oct. 11-14, 2017. (2017-10-11)

In depression the brain region for stress control is larger
Although depression is one of the leading psychiatric disorders in Germany, its cause remains unclear. A recent study at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences (MPI CBS) in Leipzig, Germany, found that those affected by depressive disorder have a larger hypothalamus compared to their healthy counterparts. This could explain why many sufferers show increased levels of the stress hormone cortisol and are very often afflicted with periods of tension. (2018-09-20)

Risk of suicide among hospitalized patients with depression decreases by half in Finland
The risk of death by suicide among patients with depression who have undergone psychiatric inpatient treatment has significantly decreased since 1991, according a large Finnish study. The study shows for the first time that it is possible for the suicide mortality to decline markedly at the population level. (2018-02-01)

Psychodynamic psychotherapy brings lasting benefits, new study finds
Psychodynamic psychotherapy is effective for a wide range of mental health symptoms, including depression, anxiety, panic and stress-related physical ailments, and the benefits of the therapy grow after treatment has ended, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. (2010-01-25)

Borderline personality disorder shows improvements with intensive psychotherapy
An intensive form of talk therapy, known as transference-focused psychotherapy (TFP), can help individuals affected with borderline personality disorder (BPD) by reducing symptoms and improving their social functioning, according to an article in the June issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry, a premier psychiatry journal. (2007-06-05)

Fear center in the brain protects against illusions
If functionality of the brain's amygdala is impaired, illusory perceptions arise much faster and more pronounced. This was discovered by a team of researchers led by the University of Bonn, who studied identical twins in whom both amygdalae are damaged. Further experiments with volunteers showed that this brain structure, which is widely known for its eminent role in fear processing, apparently provides effective protection against body perception disorders. (2019-03-12)

Interpersonal psychotherapy helps depressed women with histories of sexual trauma
Women sexually abused in childhood and adolescence who suffer from depression and post-traumatic stress disorder benefit significantly from Interpersonal Psychotherapy-Trauma, according to a Rutgers researcher. (2018-10-03)

PTSD symptoms improve when patient chooses form of treatment, study shows
A study led by the University of Washington is the first large-scale trial of hundreds of PTSD patients, including veterans and survivors of sexual assault, to measure whether patient preference in the course of treatment impacts the effectiveness of a type of cognitive behavioral therapy and use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, a type of antidepressant often prescribed for PTSD. (2018-10-19)

Full recovery now possible for an 'untreatable' mental illness
Patients coping with the chaos and misery of borderline personality disorder now have reason for strong confidence in making major life changes through a new treatment, schema therapy. For the first time, three major outcome studies have shown that many patients with borderline personality disorder can achieve full recovery across the complete range of symptoms. In one study schema therapy was shown to be more than twice as effective as a widely practiced traditional treatment. (2009-11-19)

Page 1 of 13 | 498 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.