Popular Quantum Communication News and Current Events | Page 25

Popular Quantum Communication News and Current Events, Quantum Communication News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 25 of 25 | 1000 Results
Semiconductor quantum transistor opens the door for photon-based computing
Researchers at the University of Maryland have demonstrated the first single-photon transistor using a semiconductor chip. (2018-07-05)

Researchers examine how musicians communicate non-verbally during performance
A team of researchers from McMaster University has discovered a new technique to examine how musicians intuitively coordinate with one another during a performance, silently predicting how each will express the music. (2019-01-18)

Protocells use DNA logic to communicate and compute
Researchers at the University of Bristol, Eindhoven University of Technology and Microsoft Research have successfully assembled communities of artificial cells that can chemically communicate and perform molecular computations using entrapped DNA logic gates. (2019-03-04)

Artificial atomic scale materials: Discovering how electrons fatten!
A single and isolated electron has a clear electrical charge, magnetic moment and mass, and its free movement can be precisely predicted. Spanish scientists fabricated a nanoscale artificial material manipulating atoms one after the other and discovered that electrons around are very heavier. Heavy electrons are promising particles which endow of new functionalities to novel materials. (2019-05-23)

Demystifying nanocrystal solar cells
ETH researchers have developed a comprehensive model to explain how electrons flow inside new types of solar cells made of tiny crystals. The model allows for a better understanding of such cells and may help to increase their efficiency. (2015-01-28)

A quantum entanglement between two physically separated ultra-cold atomic clouds
Members of the Department of Theoretical Physics and History of Science of the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Science and Technology together with researchers from the University of Hannover have achieved, in an experiment, quantum entanglement between two ultra-cold atomic ensembles, called Bose-Einstein condensates, spatially separated from each other. (2018-05-16)

Novel approach to coherent control of a three-level quantum system
For the first time, researchers were able to study quantum interference in a three-level quantum system and thereby control the behavior of individual electron spins. To this end, they used a novel nanostructure, in which a quantum system is integrated into a nanoscale mechanical oscillator in form of a diamond cantilever. Nature Physics has published the study that was conducted at the University of Basel and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. (2018-08-08)

Physics: Not everything is where it seems to be
Scientists at TU Wien, the University of Innsbruck and the ÖAW have for the first time demonstrated a wave effect that can lead to measurement errors in the optical position estimation of objects. The work now published in Nature Physics could have consequences for optical microscopy and optical astronomy, but could also play a role in position measurements using sound, radar, or gravitational waves. (2018-10-15)

The 'wrong' connective tissue cells signal worse prognosis for breast cancer patients
In certain forms of cancer, connective tissue forms around and within the tumour. One previously unproven theory is that there are several different types of connective tissue cells with different functions, which affect the development of the tumour in different ways. Now, a research team at Lund University in Sweden has identified three different types of connective tissue cells. In studies of breast cancer patients, the team found that two of these are linked to a worse prognosis. (2018-12-04)

A new low-latency congestion control for cellular networks
A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has proposed a novel technique that can reduce the congestion issues in the network environment. (2019-01-19)

Putting a new spin on Majorana fermions
Scientists have proposed a new method for producing more robust Majorana fermions, a kind of quasiparticle that could act as stable bits of information in next-generation quantum computers. (2019-04-01)

A dance of two: Tailoring interactions between remote fluids of excitons
An international collaboration involving European, Israeli, and US scientists realize for the first time strong and directionally dependent interactions in quantum liquids of excitons, which contrasts with the spatial isotropy of the coupling between charged particles. This spatial anisotropy affects the way particles arrange themselves in space and opens routes to artificially created exotic states of matter. The results were published in Physical Review X. (2019-05-10)

Building a bridge to the quantum world
Entanglement is one of the main principles of quantum mechanics. Physicists from Professor Johannes Fink's research group at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have found a way to use a mechanical oscillator to produce entangled radiation. This method, which the authors published in the current edition of Nature, might prove extremely useful when it comes to connecting quantum computers. (2019-06-26)

The impact of molecular rotation on a peculiar isotope effect on water hydrogen bonds
Quantum nature of hydrogen bonds in water manifests itself in peculiar physicochemical isotope effects: while deuteration often elongates and weakens hydrogen bonds of typical hydrogen-bonded systems composed of bulky constituent molecules, it elongates but strengthens hydrogen bonds of water molecular aggregates. The origin of this unique isotope effect of water molecules remains to be elucidated at the molecular level. A recent experimental study on the sublimation of isotope-mixed water ice has tackled this issue. (2019-12-02)

Bending diamond at the nanoscale
A team of Australian scientists has discovered diamond can be bent and deformed, at the nanoscale at least. The discovery opens up a range of possibilities for the design and engineering of new nanoscale devices in sensing, defence and energy storage but also shows the challenges that lie ahead for nanotechnologies. (2020-02-05)

To make an atom-sized machine, you need a quantum mechanic
Here's a new chapter in the story of the miniaturisation of machines: researchers in a laboratory in Singapore have shown that a single atom can function as either an engine or a fridge. Such a device could be engineered into future computers and fuel cells to control energy flows. (2020-05-04)

A new kind of liquid scintillator via hybridizing perovskite nanocrystals with organic molecules
Highly-efficient scintillators are playing an essential role in various fundamental science and industrial applications. For enhancing quantum yield, scientists in South Korea demonstrated a new kind of scintillating nanomaterials via hybridizing perovskite nanocrystals with organic molecules, which make it possible to detect X-rays efficiently and to achieve high-quality X-ray images in liquid form. The hybrid nanomaterials will hold substantial promise for advancing the industrial applications of X-ray imaging and producing intriguing scintillation in other hybrid nanomaterial systems. (2020-09-09)

Toward a quantum computer, one dot at a time
Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh have developed a way to create semiconductor islands smaller than 10 nanometers in scale, known as quantum dots. The islands, made from germanium and placed on the surface of silicon with two-nanometer precision, are capable of confining single electrons. (2006-01-19)

Shining a light on quantum dots measurement
Using the cadmium selenide quantum dot, researchers at Syracuse University collaborated to understand how protein corona forms and what is different about the quantum dot before and after the formation of the corona. (2015-01-15)

Georgia State physicist, international researchers discover fastest light-driven process
A discovery that promises transistors -- the fundamental part of all modern electronics -- controlled by laser pulses that will be 10,000 faster than today's fastest transistors has been made by a Georgia State University professor and international researchers. (2012-12-05)

2-D magnetism: Atom-thick platforms for energy, information and computing research
A class of 2-D magnetic materials -- known as van der Waals materials -- may offer one of the most ambitious platforms yet to understand and control phases of matter at the nanoscale. (2018-10-31)

Coincidence helps with quantum measurements
Through randomly selected measurements, Austrian physicists can determine the quantum entanglement of many-particle systems. With the newly developed method, quantum simulations can be extended to a larger number of quantum particles. In the Science Magazine, the researchers report on the first successful demonstration of this method developed by physicists from Innsbruck, Austria. (2019-04-18)

Quantum shake
There they were, in all their weird quantum glory: ultracold lithium atoms in the optical trap operated by UC Santa Barbara undergraduate student Alec Cao and his colleagues in David Weld's atomic physics group. Held by lasers in a regular, lattice formation and ''driven'' by pulses of energy, these atoms were doing crazy things. (2020-09-09)

Theoreticians show which quantum systems are suitable for quantum simulations
A joint research group led by Prof. Jens Eisert of Freie Universität Berlin and Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) has shown a way to simulate the quantum physical properties of complex solid state systems. This is done with the help of complex solid state systems that can be studied experimentally. The study was published in the renowned journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS). (2020-10-27)

Quantum engines must break down
Our present understanding of thermodynamics is fundamentally incorrect if applied to small systems and need to be modified, according to new research from University College London and the University of Gdansk. The work, establishes new laws in the rapidly emerging field of quantum thermodynamics. The findings, published today in Nature Communications, have wide applications in small systems, from nanoscale engines and quantum technologies, to biological motors and systems found in the body. (2013-06-26)

Silicon chips for optical quantum technologies
A team of physicists and engineers has demonstrated exquisite control of single particles of light -- photons -- on a silicon chip to make a major advance towards the long sought after goal of a super-powerful quantum computer. (2008-03-27)

Princeton researchers discover new type of laser
A Princeton-led team of researchers has discovered an entirely new mechanism for making common electronic materials emit laser beams. The finding could lead to lasers that operate more efficiently and at higher temperatures than existing devices, and find applications in environmental monitoring and medical diagnostics. (2008-12-22)

Light-speed nanotech: Controlling the nature of graphene
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute researchers have discovered a new method for controlling the nature of graphene, bringing chip manufacturers one step closer to realizing the mass production of graphene-based nanoelectronics. The chemistry of the surface on which graphene is deposited plays a key role in shaping the material's conductive properties: results show that when deposited on a surface treated with oxygen, graphene exhibits semiconductor properties. When deposited on material treated with hydrogen, graphene exhibits metallic properties. (2009-01-21)

Reconcilable differences: Study uncovers the common ground of scientific opposites
Princeton University researchers developed a mathematical framework that strips away the differences between scientific laws and theories to reveal how the ideas are compatible. In a recent report in the journal Physical Review Letters, the authors explain how the mathematical model finds common ground between the famously at-odds physics equations that govern classical and quantum mechanics. (2013-01-30)

Research on light-matter interaction could improve electronic and optoelectronic devices
A paper published in Nature Communications by Sufei Shi, assistant professor of chemical and biological engineering at Rensselaer, increases our understanding of how light interacts with atomically thin semiconductors and creates unique excitonic complex particles, multiple electrons, and holes strongly bound together. (2018-10-10)

Otago's atom interaction discovery valuable for future quantum technologies
By breaking with conventionality, University of Otago physicists have opened up new research and technology opportunities involving the basic building block of the world -- atoms. In a study, just published in Nature Communications, researchers put one atom inside each of two laser beams before moving them together until they started to interact with each other. (2019-04-23)

Spreading light over quantum computers
Scientists at Linköping University have shown how a quantum computer really works and have managed to simulate quantum computer properties in a classical computer. 'Our results should be highly significant in determining how to build quantum computers', says Professor Jan-Åke Larsson. (2019-09-03)

Quantum transition makes electrons behave as if they lack spin
Combining experiments under extreme conditions with theoretical analysis, researchers pursue knowledge that could be used in the future to create a new generation of sustainable functional materials for use in quantum information devices or superconductors. (2019-11-13)

Quantum physics: Physicists successfully carry out controlled transport of stored light
A team of physicists at Mainz University has successfully transported light stored in a quantum memory over a distance of 1.2 millimeters. They have demonstrated that the controlled transport process and its dynamics has only little impact on the properties of the stored light. The researchers used ultra-cold rubidium-87 atoms as a storage medium for the light as to achieve a high level of storage efficiency and a long lifetime. (2020-10-13)

3D print experts discover how to make tomorrow's technology using ink-jet printed graphene
The University of Nottingham has cracked the conundrum of how to use inks to 3D-print novel electronic devices with useful properties, such as an ability to convert light into electricity. (2020-11-04)

Clarifiying complex chemical processes with quantum computers
Science and the IT industry have high hopes for quantum computing, but descriptions of possible applications tend to be vague. Researchers at ETH Zurich have now come up with a concrete example that demonstrates what quantum computers will actually be able to achieve in the future. (2017-08-02)

Deadly parasite messaging tactic may help curb sleeping sickness
New insight into the parasites that cause sleeping sickness could offer a new pathway to tackling the disease, which poses a major threat to human health and causes severe livestock losses in parts of sub-Saharan Africa. (2017-09-04)

UTSA researcher studies how professional sports fans use mobile phones
Seok Kang, an associate professor in the Department of Communication at The University of Texas at San Antonio, is researching how professional sports teams build loyalty by engaging their fans through their mobile devices. Kang published (2017-11-28)

Secure information transmission over 500m fiber links based on quantum technologies
Prof. Zhang's group in Tsinghua University and Prof. Sheng in Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications realized the first long-distance entanglement-based quantum secure direct communication experiment based on current optical communication technologies. This work has been published as a cover paper in Science Bulletin, No. 22, 2017. (2017-11-30)

Chemical Science features stunning artwork from John Keith's lab
The back cover of Royal Society of Chemistry journal Chemical Science featured an artistic depiction of research from the laboratory of John Keith, assistant professor of chemical engineering and R.K. Mellon Faculty Fellow in Energy at the University of Pittsburgh, into a simple and effective way of modeling chemical reactions in solutions. (2018-07-03)

Page 25 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.