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Real-world intercontinental quantum communications enabled by the Micius satellite
A joint China-Austria team has performed quantum key distribution between the quantum-science satellite Micius and multiple ground stations located in Xinglong (near Beijing), Nanshan (near Urumqi), and Graz (near Vienna). Such experiments demonstrate the secure satellite-to-ground exchange of cryptographic keys with ?kHz rate during the passage of the satellite Micius over a ground station. Using Micius as a trusted relay, a secret key is created between China and Europe at locations separated up to 7,600 km on the Earth. (2018-01-19)

Distinct brain rhythms, regions help us reason about categories
The brain's ability to categorize based on straightforward resemblance or on a more abstract similarity arises from its use of distinct rhythms, at distinct times, in distinct parts of the prefrontal cortex. Gamma in one region handles sensory comparisons, but beta in another region considers the less obvious ways things go together. (2018-01-25)

Study reveals vision's role in vowel perception
In a study based at Brown University, researchers found that the motion and configuration of a speaker's lips are key components of the information people gather when distinguishing vowels in speech. (2018-03-14)

Carbon nanotubes outperform copper nanowires as interconnects
Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have created a road map that brings academia and the semiconductor industry one step closer to realizing carbon nanotube interconnects, and alleviating the current bottleneck of information flow that is limiting the potential of computer chips in everything from personal computers to portable music players. (2008-03-13)

Supercomputer comes up with a profile of dark matter
In the search for the mysterious dark matter, physicists have used elaborate computer calculations to come up with an outline of the particles of this unknown form of matter. The German-Hungarian team of researchers led by Professor Zoltán Fodor of the University of Wuppertal, Eötvös University in Budapest and Forschungszentrum Jülich carried out its calculations on Jülich's supercomputer JUQUEEN (BlueGene/Q) and presents its results in the journal Nature. (2016-11-02)

New paper offers insights into 'blinking' phenomena
A new paper by University of Notre Dame researchers offers a progress report on research aimed at unlocking the mysteries of fluorescent molecules or fluorophones. (2008-07-01)

New quantum states for better quantum memories
How can quantum information be stored as long as possible? An important step forward in the development of quantum memories has been achieved by a research team of TU Wien. (2016-11-23)

Artificial intelligence techniques reconstruct mysteries of quantum systems
The same techniques used to train self-driving cars and chess-playing computers are now helping physicists explore the complexities of the quantum world. For the first time, physicists have demonstrated that machine learning can reconstruct a quantum system based on relatively few experimental measurements. This method will allow scientists to thoroughly probe systems of particles exponentially faster than conventional, brute-force techniques. (2018-02-26)

Major discovery in controlling quantum states of single atoms
The scientists identified which mechanisms destroy the quantum properties of individual insulator. Using a Scanning Tunneling Microscope, which utilizes an atomically sharp metal tip, they were able to precisely image individual iron atoms and measure and control the time that the iron atom can maintain its quantum behavior. (2018-02-16)

Quantum dot lasers move a step closer with electric-pumping development at NTU Singapore
Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a way to make Colloidal Quantum Dots produce laser light with the help of an electric field. (2019-11-27)

Physicists reveal material for high-speed quantum internet
Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have 'rediscovered' a material that can lay the foundation for ultrahigh-speed quantum internet. Their paper published in npj Quantum Information shows how to increase the data transfer rate in unconditionally secure quantum communication lines to more than 1 gigabit per second, making quantum internet as fast as its classical counterpart. (2018-03-21)

Pulses of light to encrypt data and protect security of cryptocurrencies
Data travels through thousands of miles of fiber optic cables underneath the world's oceans--via pulses of light. And according to experts, the data in these cables is at great risk of being intercepted. However, a newly designed frequency comb--recently developed by researchers at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering might be an effective tool for data encryption. (2018-01-11)

Error-free into the quantum computer age
A study led by physicists at Swansea University in Wales, carried out by an international team of researchers and published in the journal Physical Review X shows that ion-trap technologies available today are suitable for building large-scale quantum computers. The scientists introduce trapped-ion quantum error correction protocols that detect and correct processing errors. (2017-12-15)

Quantum leap: computational approach launches new paradigm in electronic structure theory
A group of Michigan State University researchers specializing in quantum calculations has proposed a radically new computational approach to solving the complex many-particle Schrödinger equation, which holds the key to explaining the motion of electrons in atoms and molecules. (2018-01-12)

Scientists observe a new quantum particle with properties of ball lightning
Scientists at Amherst College and Aalto University have created, for the first time a three-dimensional skyrmion in a quantum gas. The skyrmion was predicted theoretically over 40 years ago, but only now has it been observed experimentally. (2018-03-02)

A curious quirk brings organic diode lasers one step closer
Since their invention in 1962, semiconductor diode lasers have revolutionized communications and made possible information storage and retrieval in CDs, DVDs and Blu-ray devices. These diode lasers use inorganic semiconductors grown in elaborate high vacuum systems. Now, a team of researchers from Penn State and Princeton University have taken a big step toward creating a diode laser from a hybrid organic-inorganic material that can be deposited from solution on a laboratory benchtop. (2017-11-20)

Optical and electrical bistability study sheds light on next-gen high speed data transfer
Today, electrical bistable devices are the foundation of digital electronics, but the bandwidth of these electronic computers is limited by the signal delay of time constants important to electronic logic operations. In an attempt to mitigate these problems, scientists have considered the development of an optical digital computer. This week, in the Journal of Applied Physics, researchers present their findings regarding the optical and electrical bistability of a single transistor operated at room temperature. (2017-09-18)

One step closer to reality: Devices that convert heat into electricity
The same researchers who pioneered the use of a quantum mechanical effect to convert heat into electricity have figured out how to make their technique work in a form more suitable to industry. (2017-01-03)

Superradiance of an ensemble of nuclei excited by a free electron laser
A collaboration of scientists has succeeded in verifying a basic prediction of the quantum-mechanical behavior of resonant systems. In the study published in Nature Physics, they were able to carefully follow, one x-ray at a time, the decay of nuclei in a perfect crystal after excitation with a flash of x-rays. They observed a dramatic reduction of the time taken to emit the first x-ray as the number of x-rays increased. (2017-12-15)

Quantum control
An international team consisting of Russian and German scientists has made a breakthrough in the creation of seemingly impossible materials. They have managed to create the world`s first quantum metamaterial which can be used as a control element in superconducting electrical circuits. (2018-01-23)

Forging a quantum leap in quantum communication
The major drawback of quantum communication today is the slow speed of data transfer, which is limited by the speed at which the parties can perform quantum measurements. Researchers at Bar-Ilan University have devised a method that overcomes this (2018-02-09)

Particle collision in large accelerators is simulated by using a quantum computer
In 2011 the UPV/EHU's QUTIS Group published in the Physical Review Letters an innovative theoretical proposal to reproduce particle collisions like those taking place in large accelerators but without having to use these huge infrastructures. Now, with the collaboration of the laboratory of Prof Kihwan Kim of the University of Tsinghua in Beijing they have confirmed the validity of the proposal by using a trapped-ion quantum simulator. This has been reported in Nature Communications. (2018-01-26)

Diamonds show promise for spintronic devices
Recently, researchers have been exploring the potential for a new technology, called spintronics, that relies on detecting and controlling a particle's spin. This technology could lead to new types of more efficient and powerful devices. In a paper published in Applied Physics Letters, researchers measured how strongly a charge carrier's spin interacts with a magnetic field in diamond. This crucial property shows diamond as a promising material for spintronic devices. (2018-01-29)

Quantum optics: Attosecond pulses break into atomic interior
Munich based physicists have been able to observe the interaction of multiple photons in a single attosecond pulse with electrons in the inner orbital shell of an atom for the first time. To this end they generated attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. (2018-02-27)

The Big Bell Test: Participatory science puts quantum physics to the test
An international collaboration created by The Institute of Photonic Sciences in Barcelona, including twelve laboratories on five continents, including Institut de Physique de Nice (CNRS/Université Nice Sophia Antipolis), conducted a unique participatory science experiment. By gathering about 100,000 people worldwide through a video game, the researchers circumvented the data generation problem and rigorously validated their experimental observations on the violation of Bell inequalities. The results were published in Nature on May 10, 2018. (2018-05-09)

Tiny infrared laser holds promise as weapon against terror
Northwestern University researchers have demonstrated a specialized laser that holds promise as a weapon of defense in civilian and military applications. They became the first to create a quantum cascade laser that can operate continuously at high power and at room temperature with an emission wavelength of 9.5 microns and a light output greater than 100 milliwatts. Once optimized, the tiny laser could be used for the early detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents. (2005-08-05)

Finding order in disorder demonstrates a new state of matter
Physicists have identified a new state of matter whose structural order operates by rules more aligned with quantum mechanics than standard thermodynamic theory. (2018-04-02)

Trust is good, quantum trickery is better
An international team of scientists prove, for the first time, the security of so-called device-independent quantum cryptography in a regime that is attainable with state-of-the-art quantum technology, thus paving the way to practical realization of such schemes in which users don not have to worry whether their devices can be trusted or not. (2018-01-31)

Majorana runners go long range: New topological phases of matter unveiled
New topological phases of matter have been discovered by researchers from Universidad Complutense, MIT, and Harvard University. They have found a mechanism that enhances the presence of Majorana quasiparticles at the edges of a topological superconductor. These findings open the door to unexpected applications in the development of quantum technologies. (2018-02-26)

Testing quantum field theory in a quantum simulator
Quantum field theories are often hard to verify in experiments. Now, there is a new way of putting them to the test. Scientists have created a quantum system consisting of thousands of ultra cold atoms. By keeping them in a magnetic trap on an atom chip, this atom cloud can be used as a 'quantum simulator', which yields new insights into some of the most fundamental questions of physics. (2017-05-17)

Quantum 'hack' to unleash computing power
The building blocks of quantum computers -- qubits -- are highly unstable and prone to error. Building tolerance to such error is a major hurdle in scaling up practical quantum computers. Now University of Sydney physicists have found that modifying qubit surface codes can improve quantum error correction by up to 400 percent. (2018-02-01)

First single-enzyme method to produce quantum dots revealed
Three Lehigh University engineers have successfully demonstrated the first precisely controlled, biological way to manufacture quantum dots using a single-enzyme, paving the way for a significantly quicker, cheaper and greener production method. Their work was recently featured in an article in The New York Times called 'A curious tale of quantum dots.' (2016-05-09)

Unconventional superconductor may be used to create quantum computers of the future
With their insensitivity to decoherence what are known as Majorana particles could become stable building blocks of a quantum computer. The problem is that they only occur under very special circumstances. Now researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have succeeded in manufacturing a component that is able to host the sought-after particles. (2018-02-19)

HKUST-PKU physicists quantum simulate topological materials with ultracold atoms
A team of physicists from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and Peking University reported the observation of an SPT phase for ultracold atoms using atomic quantum simulation. This work opens the way to expanding the scope of SPT physics with ultracold atoms and studying non-equilibrium quantum dynamics in these exotic systems. (2018-03-13)

Bending hot molecules
Hot molecules are found in extreme environments such as the edges of fusion reactors. For simulations that e.g. help to understand the physics of planetary atmospheres, it is crucial to know how these molecules react. In a study published in EPJ D, Masamitsu Hoshino from Sophia University, Tokyo, Japan, and colleagues reveal a method for controlling the likelihood that reactions between electrons and hot molecules occur, by altering the degree of bending the linear molecules. (2016-05-18)

Nanomaterials
As LMU physicists demonstrate in a new study, the optical and photocatalytic properties of so-called carbon dots can be precisely tuned by controlling the positions of nitrogen atoms introduced into their structure. (2017-11-15)

The inner lives of molecules
Researchers from Canada, the UK and Germany have developed a new experimental technique to take 3-D images of molecules in action. This tool can help scientists better understand the quantum mechanics underlying bigger and more complex molecules. They describe their work in this week's The Journal of Chemical Physics. (2017-04-04)

Artificial agent designs quantum experiments
On the way to an intelligent laboratory, physicists from Innsbruck and Vienna present an artificial agent that autonomously designs quantum experiments. In initial experiments, the system has independently (re)discovered experimental techniques that are nowadays standard in modern quantum optical laboratories. This shows how machines could play a more creative role in research in the future. (2018-01-19)

New controls scale quantum chips
A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is 'qubit interference.' In new research published in Science Advances magazine, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. (2018-02-02)

Nuclear physicists leap into quantum computing with first simulations of atomic nucleus
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory are the first to successfully simulate an atomic nucleus using a quantum computer. The results, published in Physical Review Letters, demonstrate the ability of quantum systems to compute nuclear physics problems and serve as a benchmark for future calculations. (2018-05-23)

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