Popular Race News and Current Events

Popular Race News and Current Events, Race News Articles.
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Democrats outgunning GOP in e-mail wars, researchers find
By at least one measure -- e-mail -- the Democratic Party appears to be waging a more aggressive campaign than the Republicans. (2004-10-29)

Study clusters health behavior groups to broaden public health interventions
A new study led by a University of Kansas researcher has used national health statistics and identified how to cluster seven health behavior groups based on smoking status, alcohol use, physical activity, physician visits and flu vaccination are associated with mortality. (2017-03-15)

Racial differences in age at breast cancer diagnosis challenges use of single age-based screening guidelines
Among women in the US diagnosed with breast cancer, a higher proportion of nonwhite patients were diagnosed at younger than 50 years of age compared to white patients, suggesting that age-based screening guidelines that do not account for race may result in underscreening of nonwhite women. (2018-03-07)

Breast cancer statistics, 2017
Breast cancer death rates dropped 39 percent between 1989 and 2015, averting 322,600 breast cancer deaths during those 26 years. Death rates in several states are now statistically equivalent, perhaps reflecting an elimination of disparities in those states. (2017-10-03)

Obesity is in the eye of the beholder
Doctors have a specific definition of what it means to be overweight or obese, but in the social world, gender, race and generation matter a lot for whether people are judged as 'thin enough' or 'too fat.' (2017-05-18)

Where you live is more influential than where you worship in shaping racial attitudes
Whites in multiracial congregations have more diverse friendship networks and are more comfortable with minorities -- but that is more because of the impact of neighbors and friends of other races than due to congregations' influence, a Baylor University study has found. (2018-04-23)

Findings support role of vascular disease in development of Alzheimer's disease
Among adults who entered a study more than 25 years ago, an increasing number of midlife vascular risk factors, such as obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol and smoking, were associated with elevated levels of brain amyloid (protein fragments linked to Alzheimer's disease) later in life, according to a study published by JAMA. (2017-04-11)

Study examines opioid use in patients with rheumatoid arthritis
A new analysis indicates that the use of opioid pain medications in older US rheumatoid arthritis patients peaked in 2010 and is now declining slightly. (2017-06-21)

Reports of shared decision making increase in the united states, but disparities exist
Between 2002 and 2014, reports of shared decision making increased significantly among adult Americans. Analyses of data from a nationally representative survey found that the mean shared decision making composite increased from 4.4 to 5. (2017-11-20)

Risk factors for prostate cancer
New research suggests that age, race and family history are the biggest risk factors for a man to develop prostate cancer, although high blood pressure, high cholesterol, vitamin D deficiency, inflammation of prostate, and vasectomy also add to the risk. In contrast, obesity, alcohol abuse, and smoking show a negative association with the disease. Details are reported in the International Journal of Medical Engineering and Informatics. (2015-09-29)

Review examines diversity in dermatology clinical trials
Racial and ethnic groups can be underrepresented in medical research. So what is the makeup of participants in randomized clinical trials of common dermatologic conditions? A review article published online by JAMA Dermatology attempts to answer that question. (2017-01-04)

Study shows race, not experience, impacts hiring in sports world
If you want to get your foot in the door of the sports industry, your race may mean more than your experience. That's the major result of a new study from North Carolina State University that examined hiring decisions for entry-level sports management positions. (2010-07-07)

Black patients more likely to be excluded from prostate cancer trials
Study finds nearly half of all prostate cancer randomized clinical trials use lab results that are more likely to exclude black patients due to racial variations in laboratory values. (2018-02-08)

Minority patients with rheumatic diseases have worse COVID-19 outcomes
New research at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology's annual meeting, reveals that people of color with rheumatic disease have worse health outcomes from COVID-19 infection, are more likely to be hospitalized to treat their coronavirus infection, and are more likely to require invasive ventilator treatment. (2020-11-06)

Who should be on the $10 and $20 bills? How race, gender, and politics shape public opinion
Race, gender, political affiliation, and the prejudices and biases associated with them (racism, sexism, and political ideology) seem to be at the forefront of citizen's minds when it comes to preferences for US currency -- specifically, who should be on the $10 and $20 bills. (2018-06-06)

UC researchers examine racial and gender disparities in dialysis patients
UC researchers are examining racial and gender disparities in dialysis patients as well as the impact of poor functional status and pre-dialysis hospitalizations on elderly dialysis patients. The research team presented four separate studies, all based on data from the United States Renal Data System. Three of the four studies accounted for elderly patient pre-dialysis health status, while the fourth examined racial and gender disparities and the type of vascular access in hemodialysis patients. (2017-11-03)

The new racial disparity in special education
Racial disparity in special education is growing, and it's more complex than previously thought. New research from Michigan State University examined how often black and Hispanic students are identified as needing special education compared to white students, leading to new findings on disproportionality and racial gaps. (2019-07-02)

More diversity needed in medical school textbooks: Study
Depictions of race and skin tone in anatomy textbooks widely used in North American medical schools could be contributing to racial bias in medical treatment, new research suggests. (2018-03-01)

One in 5 patients report discrimination in health care
The analysis by researchers at UC San Francisco, Stanford University, and UC Berkeley found that discrimination reported by black patients declined significantly over the six-year study period, reducing the difference between blacks and whites from 8.2 percent to 2.5 percent. But by far, racial discrimination remained the most common reason cited by blacks for receiving poor service or treatment from doctors and hospitals. (2017-12-14)

African-American mothers rate boys higher for ADHD
African-American children often are reported by parents and teachers to display behaviors of ADHD at a higher rate than children from other racial and ethnic groups. For the first time, researchers have found that African-American mothers in a study rated boys as displaying more frequent ADHD symptoms than Caucasian mothers did, regardless of child race. The findings mean that racial differences found in prior studies may be more due to maternal race than child race. (2018-11-30)

Black + white = Not white
A new study suggests that the so-called 'minority bias' exerts a powerful influence -- important since one in five Americans is expected to identify as multiracial by 2050. University of Utah psychology professor Jacqueline M. Chen, lead author of the study published by the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, that found observers were most likely to categorize someone who is black-white multiracial as non-white. The findings are the first to document minority bias as a guiding principle in multiracial categorization. (2018-06-14)

Attitudes toward race, immigration underscored vote switching in 2016 election
It's estimated that around 9% of voters who supported Barack Obama in 2012 crossed party lines to endorse Donald Trump in 2016 -- but why? According to a team of researchers that included Loren Collingwood, an associate professor of political science at the University of California, Riverside, the reasons behind so-called ''vote switching'' might be more complicated than originally expected. (2019-07-25)

Study concludes no racial disparities in long-term outcomes in recipients of liver transplants
New research published in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons shows long-term survival and liver rejection rates are equivalent for African-American liver transplant patients as compared with patients of other races. The study also suggests that although other factors such as liver cancer or hepatitis may negatively influence long-term survival, race does not. (2008-05-19)

Racism on college campuses is rooted in the small things people say and do
While overt and blatant expressions of prejudice seem to have declined on American university campuses over the last few decades, racism is still evident in the small things that white students say and do. This is true for those who think that minorities are too sensitive about race issues, says Jonathan Kanter of the University of Washington in the US. He is the lead author of a study in Springer's journal Race and Social Problems. (2017-08-31)

Tea Party movement has paved the way for racialized language in US politics
Overtly racially motivated rhetoric is becoming increasingly acceptable in Republican politics in the US. Two Italian researchers argue that this can partly be traced back to the conservative Tea Party movement which has reshaped the Republican party's identity away from its traditional conservative axioms to one that is more nativist and racially tinged. Luigi Leone and Fabio Presaghi from the Sapienza University of Rome have published their findings in Springer's journal Race and Social Problems. (2018-02-08)

People of color exposed to more pollution from cars, trucks, power plants over 10 years
A new nationwide study finds that the US made little progress from 2000 to 2010 in reducing relative disparities between people of color and whites in exposure to harmful air pollution emitted by cars, trucks and other combustion sources. It found disparities in NO2 exposure were larger by race and ethnicity than by income, age or education, and that those inequities persisted across the decade. (2017-09-14)

Study examines law enforcement-inflicted injuries using California hospital data
An analysis of hospital visits in California shows trends in injuries inflicted by law enforcement officers in the line of duty and how those injuries were associated with the race and ethnicity of individuals they encountered. (2018-09-14)

Children view people's behavior, psychological characteristics as shaped by environments
A new study has found that 5- to 6-year-olds view people's environments, not their skin color, as the most important determinant of their behavior and psychological characteristics. These findings contradict the idea that views of race that are known to lead to prejudice such as believing that race naturally divides the world into distinct kinds of people's inevitably develop early in childhood. (2018-01-23)

Study: More customer information can help Airbnb address discrimination
New research by an Indiana University Kelley School of Business professor suggests that companies in the sharing economy can eliminate discrimination by encouraging clients to write reviews and by designing better ways to share information that signals guest quality. (2017-03-01)

Numbers about inequality don't speak for themselves
In a new research paper, Stanford scholars Rebecca Hetey and Jennifer Eberhardt propose new ways to talk about racial disparities. (2018-05-29)

Racial, political identities influence how people view cause of deadly police encounters
People's racial and political identities strongly shaped how they viewed the causes of several recent widely publicized police encounters that resulted in the deaths of African American men, according to a new study by two University of Kansas researchers. (2017-12-13)

Open-ended laboratory tests for cyclists could help athletes train better
Scientists at the University of Kent's School of Sport and Exercise Sciences have discovered that cyclists can perform better when they do not have to pace their efforts. Using 17 experienced male cyclists in a series of tests, they compared open-ended Time-To-Exhaustion (TTE) trials that are often used in laboratories with race-like Time-Trials to measure endurance performance. All of the cyclists were blinded to elapsed time, power output, cadence and heart rate. (2017-09-25)

Study reveals racial differences in the use of rehabilitation services
In a Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study of 6,309 community-dwelling Medicare enrollees (1,276 of whom reported receiving rehabilitation services in the previous 12 months), the likelihood of receiving rehabilitation services was 1.4-times greater in whites than in blacks. (2017-11-08)

Study: Stereotypes about race and responsibility persist in bankruptcy system
Bankruptcy attorneys have little knowledge of the racial disparities that exist within the bankruptcy system, relying instead on common stereotypes about race, responsibility and debt, according to research co-written by Robert M. Lawless, the Max L. Rowe Professor of Law at Illinois and a leading consumer credit and bankruptcy expert. (2017-11-29)

Counselors are often unprepared to identify and treat race-based trauma
In a Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development study that included106 counseling professionals, 71% of participants reported working with clients who had symptoms associated with race-based trauma, but 67% indicated they had not received training to identify race-based trauma among individuals of color, and 81% indicated they had not received training to treat race-based trauma. (2018-01-08)

Poorer socioeconomic status predicts lower survival in patients with anal cancer
If you are from a lower income area, your chances of surviving anal cancer are significantly reduced, according to a new study led by investigators at NYU Langone Health's Perlmutter Cancer Center. (2018-03-19)

Race, pre-pregnancy BMI may help predict maternal weight gain
Race and pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) both affect leptin and adiponectin levels, and leptin levels in mid-pregnancy may be an important predictor of weight gain during pregnancy, new research suggests. The results will be presented on in a poster on Sunday, March 18 at ENDO 2018, the 100th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Chicago, Ill. (2018-03-18)

Research finds entrenched hiring bias against African-Americans
In a new Northwestern University meta-analysis, the largest and most comprehensive of its kind, researchers aiming to assess trends in hiring discrimination in America against African-Americans and Latinos found no change in rates of discrimination against African-Americans in field experiments of hiring from 1990 to 2015. The meta-analysis documents persistence of racial discrimination in US labor markets. (2017-09-12)

Black patients show stronger response to hormone therapy for prostate cancer
African-American men with advanced prostate cancer might be more responsive than white men to an anti-androgen drug and steroids, according to a study led by Duke Cancer Institute researchers. (2018-06-01)

US children show clear evidence of bias at the intersection of race and gender
A new Northwestern University study provides strong and consistent evidence of bias at the intersection of race and gender in 4-year-old children. The researchers examined 4-year-old children's responses to images of other children who varied both in race -- black and white -- and gender -- female and male. (2019-01-24)

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