Popular Radioactivity News and Current Events

Popular Radioactivity News and Current Events, Radioactivity News Articles.
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How slick water and black shale in fracking combine to produce radioactive waste
Study explains how radioactive radium transfers to wastewater in the widely-used method to extract oil and gas. (2018-09-18)

OUP publishes free article collection about Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster
March 11, 2016, marks five years since the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster. In the last five years, researchers all over the world have been conducting substantial studies to find out the effect on the environment, human bodies, and our society. In honor of their great work, Oxford University Press has made 30 research articles about the accident from nine journals freely available to read online for a year. (2016-03-09)

Research highlights ethical sourcing of materials for modern technology
Researchers from the Camborne School of Mines have identified methods to predict the environmental and social cost of resourcing new deposits of rare earth minerals used in the production of mobile phones, wind turbines and electric vehicles. (2017-11-10)

Some Chinese coal ash too radioactive for reuse
Many manufacturers use coal ash from power plants as a low-cost binding agent in concrete and other building materials. But a new study finds that coal ash from high-uranium deposits in China is too radioactive for this use. Some coal ash analyzed in the study contained radiation 43 times higher than the maximum safe limit set for residential building materials by the U.N. Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. (2017-11-09)

Artificial intelligence accurately predicts distribution of radioactive fallout
Researchers at the University of Tokyo Institute of Industrial Science created a machine-learning-based tool that can predict where radioactive emissions from nuclear power plants will disperse. After training using extensive data on previous weather patterns, the tool consistently achieved over 85 percent predictive accuracy, and up to 95 percent in winter when large and predictable weather systems dominate. This tool can aid immediate evacuation in the aftermath of disasters like those at Fukushima and Chernobyl. (2018-07-02)

Radioactivity from oil and gas wastewater persists in Pennsylvania stream sediments
More than seven years after Pennsylvania officials requested that the disposal of radium-laden fracking wastewater into surface waters be restricted, a new Duke study finds that high levels of radioactivity persist in stream sediments at three disposal sites. Radioactivity at these sites is 650 times higher than at unaffected sites upstream. The contamination comes from conventional, or non-fracked, oil and gas wastewater, which, under current state regulations, can still be treated and discharged into streams. (2018-01-19)

Ukrainian villages still suffering legacy of Chernobyl more than 30 years on
Milk in parts of Ukraine has radioactivity levels up to five times over the country's official safe limit, new research shows. (2018-06-08)

Background radiation in UAE's agricultural topsoil found to be lower than global average
The first civilian nuclear power plant in the Eastern Region of Arabian Desert, and specifically in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), will be operating four reactors between (2018- 2020). Before the construction of any regulated nuclear facility, it is essential to investigate the environmental background radiation level in the country. This study determines the primordial radionuclides concentrations obtained from 145 soil samples collected from multiple agriculture farms in the UAE. (2018-03-13)

Visualizing nuclear radiation
Extraordinary decontamination efforts are underway in areas affected by the 2011 nuclear accidents in Japan. The creation of total radioactivity maps is essential for thorough cleanup, but the most common methods do not 'see' enough ground-level radiation. (2017-03-22)

New device uses biochemistry techniques to detect rare radioactive decays
UTA researchers are now taking advantage of a biochemistry technique that uses fluorescence to detect ions to identify the product of a radioactive decay called neutrinoless double-beta decay that would demonstrate that the neutrino is its own antiparticle. (2018-03-27)

An emergency method for measuring strontium levels in milk can be used in routine studies
The UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country's Nuclear and Radiological Safety research group is participating in validations of methods proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency. In a recently published study, this group has tested the viability of a method proposed by the international agency to measure radioactive strontium in milk, developed for cases of nuclear emergency, so that it can be incorporated into routine radiological monitoring measurements. (2017-09-08)

CT scans may increase the risk of brain cancer
A new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute suggests that CT scans, commonly used in medical imaging, may increase the risk of brain tumors. (2018-07-18)

Brain opioids help us to relate with others
A new Finnish research reveals how brain's opioids modulate responses towards other people's pain. (2017-05-30)

MIT finds young planets stay hotter longer
Hot, young planets may be easier to spot because they stay that way longer than astronomers have thought, according to new work by MIT planetary scientist Linda Elkins-Tanton. (2008-10-15)

Mailman School PH study finds increase in thyroid diseases risk from exposure at Chernobyl
Persons exposed to radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl accident as children and adolescents have an increased risk of follicular adenoma or benign tumor of the thyroid gland, according to a Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health study. Results further suggest that age at exposure, history of thyroid diseases and location of residence do not modify its risk. (2008-02-19)

UH scientists investigating mysterious dark matter
University of Houston scientists are helping to develop a technology that could hold the key to unraveling one of the great mysteries of science: what constitutes dark matter? (2018-03-15)

New procedure for obtaining a cheap ultra-hard material that is resistant to radioactivity
The material has been made using the technique of laser zone floating, which consists of fusion by means of the application of intense laser radiation and then rapid solidification. Professor Cumbrera's team has used X-ray diffraction techniques to characterize the crystallography of the samples obtained and the defects present in them, as well as the possible preferential ordering of the polycrystal grains. (2019-10-25)

Sewage sludge could make great sustainable fertilizer
Ever thought of putting sewage on your plants? Scientists say thermally conditioned sewage sludge serves as an excellent fertilizer to improve soil properties. This was recently published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Nutrition. The major advantage over commercial fertilizers? Sustainable re-use of essential and finite phosphorus resources. (2016-08-15)

Zn-InsP6 complex can enhance excretion of radioactive strontium from the body
Researchers at Kanazawa University have found a new phenomenon that a complex of myo-inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) with zinc enhances excretion of radioactive strontium from the body. (2018-06-01)

Distribution of highly radioactive microparticles in Fukushima revealed
New method allows scientists to create a quantitative map of radioactive cesium-rich microparticle distribution in soils collected around the damaged Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP). This could help inform clean-up efforts in Fuksuhima region. (2019-10-16)

LEDs light the way for better drug therapies
A revolutionary new technique to create radioactive molecules, pioneered in the lab of Princeton University chemistry professor David MacMillan, has the potential to bring new medicines to patients much faster than before -- using light. While the previous approach took months, MacMillan's photocatalytic process replaces hydrogen with tritium in just hours. (2017-11-09)

Why does aspirin increase the susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori to antimicrobials?
A research group from China investigated the mechanisms of aspirin increasing the susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) to metronidazole. They found that although aspirin increases the susceptibility of H. pylori to metronidazole, it has no effect on the mutations of rdxA gene of H. pylori. Aspirin increases endocellular concentrations of antimicrobials and probably by altering the expression of the outer membrane proteins of H. pylori. (2009-03-03)

Eating triggers endorphin release in the brain
Finnish researchers have revealed how eating stimulates brain's endogenous opioid system to signal pleasure and satiety. (2017-08-28)

Researchers observe slowest atom decay ever measured
The XENON1T detector is mainly used to detect dark matter particles deep underground. But a research team led by Zurich physicists, among others, has now managed to observe an extremely rare process using the detector -- the decay of the Xenon-124 atom, which has an enormously long half-life of 1.8 x 10 high 22 years. (2019-04-24)

Oil and gas wastewater on the road could mean health and environment woes
A truck kicking up dust as it speeds down a dirt road is a typical image in country music videos. But this dust from unpaved roads is also an environmental and health hazard. To prevent dust clouds, some states treat dirt motorways with oil and gas wastewater. Now one group reports in Environmental Science & Technology that this wastewater contains harmful pollutants that have the potential to do more harm than good. (2018-05-30)

First reliable estimates of highly radioactive cesium-rich microparticles released by Fukushima disaster
Scientists have for the first time been able to estimate the amount of radioactive cesium-rich microparticles released by the disaster at the Fukushima power plant in 2011. This work, which will have significant health and environmental implications, is presented at the Goldschmidt geochemistry conference in Boston. (2018-08-14)

Study provides insights on sources of environmental contamination following Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster
Four years after Japan's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster that led to major releases of radioactivity to environment, questions still remain regarding the original sources of radioactive contamination. (2016-01-19)

Are doctors treating more thyroid cancer patients than necessary?
New research may help change treatment practices for patients diagnosed with low risk thyroid cancer. (2019-07-10)

Researchers perfect nanoscience tool for studies of nuclear waste storage
Studying radiation chemistry and electronic structure of materials at scales smaller than nanometres, the University of Guelph team prepared samples of clay in ultra-thin layers. Working at the TRIUMF particle accelerator, they bombarded the samples with antimatter subatomic particles. They found their system is a proven tool for radiation studies of material to be used to store nuclear waste -- important for Canadian nuclear industry looking to build its first geological repository. (2019-12-12)

Radioactive tadpoles reveal contamination clues
Tadpoles can be used to measure the amount of radiocesium, a radioactive material, in aquatic environments, according to new research from University of Georgia scientists. (2019-06-25)

'Diamond-age' of power generation as nuclear batteries developed
New technology has been developed that uses nuclear waste to generate electricity in a nuclear-powered battery. A team of physicists and chemists from the University of Bristol have grown a man-made diamond that, when placed in a radioactive field, is able to generate a small electrical current. The development could solve some of the problems of nuclear waste, clean electricity generation and battery life. (2016-11-25)

Fukushima radioactive particle release was significant says new research
Scientists say there was a significant release of radioactive particles during the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear accident. The researchers identified the contamination using a new method and say if the particles are inhaled they could pose long-term health risks to humans. (2018-05-24)

HIIT releases endorphins in the brain
Finnish researchers at the University of Turku have revealed that exercise-induced endorphin release in the brain depends on the intensity of the exercise. Endorphin release induced by exercise may be an important mechanism which affects exercise motivation and maintenance of regular physical activity. (2017-08-24)

Impact of the Fukushima accident on marine life, five years later
Five years ago, the largest single release of human-made radioactive discharge to the marine environment resulted from an accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan. An article in the October issue of IEAM explores the environmental consequences in the marine environment, including the status of current research about the impact of the fallout on plant and animal life and what remains to be done as the radioactivity continues to spread. (2016-10-18)

Uranium in mine dust could dissolve in human lungs
New Mexico contains hundreds of historic uranium mines. Although active uranium mining in the state has ceased, rates of cardiovascular and metabolic disease remain high in the population residing close to mines within the Navajo Nation. According to a new study in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters, inhaled uranium in dusts from the mines could be a factor. (2018-12-05)

Ambitious experiments cast light on far reaches of periodic table
A study of newly made chemical compounds is giving scientists a fresh understanding of an elusive element. (2016-05-23)

Acid mine drainage reduces radioactivity in fracking waste
Blending fracking wastewater with acid mine drainage causes most of the naturally radioactive metals in the fracking water to precipitate into a solid for disposal. The practice also could help reduce the depletion of local freshwater resources by giving drillers a source of usable recycled water for the hydraulic fracturing process. (2014-01-09)

New 'seed' therapy helps pinpoint breast tumors with more accuracy
Physicians at UT Southwestern Medical Center are the first in Texas to use a new technique in which a small radioactive pellet, or (2007-10-11)

Cosmic rays may soon stymie quantum computing
Infinitesimally low levels of radiation, such as from incoming cosmic rays, may soon stymie progress in quantum computing. (2020-08-26)

Oil and gas wastewater as dust suppressant less than ideal
At the least, wastewater from oil and gas drilling should be treated in a waste treatment facility before it is used on dirt roads to suppress dust or deice roads. At the best, affordable, nontoxic dust suppressants should be developed and used, according to a multidisciplinary team of researchers. (2018-05-30)

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