Popular Reading News and Current Events

Popular Reading News and Current Events, Reading News Articles.
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Novice drivers talking on hand-held smartphones are more likely to run red-lights
Young novice drivers who speak into hand-held smartphones while driving are also likely to drive while under the influence of drink or drugs, according to researchers at Lero, the Science Foundation Ireland Research Centre for Software. (2021-02-23)

Can AI spot liars?
Though algorithms are increasingly being deployed in all facets of life, a new USC study has found that they fail basic tests as truth detectors. (2019-09-04)

MSU-based scientists discovered a molecular timer based on stalling ribosomes
A molecular biologist from Lomonosov Moscow State University together with foreign colleagues discovered a special mechanism of protein synthesis regulation that they called a 'molecular timer'. It controls the number of protein molecules produced by a cell and prevents the generation of extra molecules. When activated with drugs, such a timer may help efficiently combat cancerous tumors. (2018-02-02)

Engaging children in math at home equals a boost in more than just math skills
Preschool children who engage in math activities at home with their parents not only improve their math skills, but also their general vocabulary, according to research from Purdue University. (2017-11-10)

Learning a second alphabet for a first language
A part of the brain that maps letters to sounds can acquire a second, visually distinct alphabet for the same language, according to a study of English speakers published in eNeuro. The research challenges theoretical constraints on the range of visual forms available to represent written language. (2019-02-11)

Computerized writing aids make writing easier for persons with aphasia
It is possible to improve writing skills for those with aphasia with the aid of computerised writing aids. This is the conclusion of a doctoral thesis from the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. (2009-02-03)

Preschool teachers ask children too many simple questions
When preschool teachers read books in their classrooms, the questions they ask play a key role in how much children learn, research has shown. But a new study that involved observing teachers during class story times found that they asked few questions -- and those that they did ask were usually too simple. (2019-07-25)

Language used on credit card websites the hardest to understand
New research led by the University of East Anglia reveals how easy it is for consumers to understand the language used on personal finance websites. The study analyzed the text of websites for payday lenders, personal loans and credit cards in the UK and found that while payday loans sites are easier to read, all are difficult. Credit card websites are hardest to read and contain more complex terminology, though no significant differences are found between payday loans and personal loans. (2019-01-25)

Pictures in your head -- the secret of beautiful poems
The more a poem evokes vivid sensory imagery, the more we like it. (2017-12-13)

New study finds reading can help with chronic pain
A study conducted by researchers from the University of Liverpool, The Reader and the Royal Liverpool University Hospitals Trust, and funded by the British Academy, has found that shared reading (SR) can be a useful therapy for chronic pain sufferers. (2017-03-01)

Want to help your child succeed in school? Add language to the math, reading mix
A University of Washington study finds that a child's language skills in kindergarten can predict his or her future proficiency in other subjects. (2018-05-17)

Pre-school age exercises can prevent dyslexia
A typical characteristics of children's linguistic development are early signs of the risk of developing reading and writing disabilities, or dyslexia. (2008-08-27)

Video plus brochure helps patients make lung cancer scan decision
A short video describing the potential benefits and risks of low-dose CT screening for lung cancer in addition to an informational brochure increased patients' knowledge and reduced conflicted feelings about whether to undergo the scan more than the informational brochure alone, according to a randomized, controlled trial published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society. (2019-04-19)

Elevated blood pressure before pregnancy may increase chance of pregnancy loss
Elevated blood pressure before conception may increase the chances for pregnancy loss, according to an analysis by researchers at the National Institutes of Health. The authors conclude that lifestyle changes to keep blood pressure under control could potentially reduce the risk of loss. The study appears in Hypertension. (2018-04-02)

Is educational neuroscience a waste of money?
Educational neuroscience has little to offer schools or children's education, according to new research from the University of Bristol, UK. (2016-03-09)

Why US policies for dyslexia should be scrapped
Many of the current US Federal and State dyslexia laws should be scrapped as they ignore scientific evidence and privilege some poor readers at the expense of huge numbers of others, according to a leading expert in reading disability. (2018-03-05)

Inherited mutation leads to overproduction of EPO
A newly-discovered hereditary mutation is responsible for an increased production of erythropoietin (EPO) in the blood. This mutation causes a messenger RNA (mRNA) that is not normally involved in the formation of proteins to be reprogrammed so that it produces EPO, thus abnormally increasing the number of red blood cells. Researchers from the Department of Biomedicine at the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel reported these findings in The New England Journal of Medicine. (2018-03-08)

Countries with greater gender equality have lower percentage of female STEM graduates
Although women currently are well represented in life sciences, they continue to be underrepresented in inorganic sciences, such as computer science and physics. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri and Leeds Beckett University in the United Kingdom have found that as societies become wealthier and more gender equal, women are less likely to obtain degrees in STEM. The researchers call this a 'gender-equality paradox.' Researchers also discovered a near-universal sex difference in academic strengths and weaknesses that contributes to the STEM gap. (2018-02-15)

Reading on electronic devices may interfere with science reading comprehension
People who often read on electronic devices may have a difficult time understanding scientific concepts, according to a team of researchers. They suggest that this finding, among others in the study, could also offer insights on how reading a scientific text differs from casual reading. (2017-12-06)

Study sheds new light on how bilinguals process language
A study led by psychologist and cognitive neuroscientist Megan Zirnstein at the University of California, Riverside shows that bilinguals who are highly proficient in their second language, such as international students who have come to the United States to pursue higher education, can not only overcome the difficulty that being immersed in their non-native language imposes, but also engage in reading strategies in their second language just like their monolingual peers. (2018-04-09)

Brain activity can be used to predict reading success up to 2 years in advance
By measuring brainwaves, it is possible to predict what a child's reading level will be years in advance, according to research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2017-03-27)

Study: Parental conflict can do lasting damage to kids
Even relatively low-level adversity like parental conflict can do lasting damage to children, a new study finds. Shy children are especially vulnerable. (2018-03-28)

Stem cells treat macular degeneration
UCSB researchers helped develop a specially engineered retinal patch to treat people with sudden, severe sight loss. (2018-03-19)

Mayo Clinic study finds no evidence that anesthesia in young children lowers intelligence
A Mayo Clinic study finds no evidence that children given anesthesia before their third birthdays have lower IQs than those who did not have it. A more complex picture emerges among people who had anesthesia several times as small children: Although their intelligence is comparable, they score modestly lower on tests measuring fine motor skills, and their parents are more likely to report behavioral and learning problems. The findings are published in Anesthesiology. (2018-04-18)

Threatened by diversity
Psychologist Brenda Major identifies what may be a key factor in many white Americans' support for Donald Trump. (2016-10-26)

Study explores link between curiosity and school achievement
The more curious the child, the more likely he or she may be to perform better in school -- regardless of economic background -- suggests a new University of Michigan study. (2018-04-30)

Reading, writing, arithmetic, and aerobics -- Evaluating the new 'R' in academic performance
Although the long-term consequences of childhood obesity are well documented, some school districts have reduced physical education classes to devote more time to the three Rs in education -- reading, writing, and arithmetic. However, there is new evidence that leaving out an important fourth R -- aerobics -- could actually be counterproductive for increasing test scores. A new study scheduled for publication in The Journal of Pediatrics studied the associations between aerobic fitness, body mass index, and passing scores on standardized math and reading tests. (2013-02-28)

Study finds reading information aloud to yourself improves memory
You are more likely to remember something if you read it out loud, a study from the University of Waterloo has found. (2017-12-01)

Walking simulation games signal a new literary genre
Walking simulation games signal a new literary genre Research from the University of Kent has revealed that walking simulations are blurring the boundaries of different art forms to create a new literary genre. Walking simulations -- video games where there are no winners and no one is shot at or killed -- have become increasingly popular in the last few years. (2019-02-12)

'Fake fin' discovery reveals new ichthyosaur species
An ichthyosaur first discovered in the 1970s but then dismissed and consigned to museum storerooms across the country has been re-examined and found to be a new species. (2017-10-10)

A letter we've seen millions of times, yet can't write
Despite seeing it millions of times in pretty much every picture book, every novel, every newspaper and every email message, people are essentially unaware of the more common version of the lowercase print letter 'g,' Johns Hopkins researchers have found. (2018-04-03)

More breast cancers found with combined digital screening
A combination of digital mammography and tomosynthesis detects 90 percent more breast cancers than digital mammography alone, according to a new study. (2018-06-05)

Aging bonobos in the wild could use reading glasses too
As people age, they often find that it's more difficult to see things up close. Reading a newspaper suddenly requires a good pair of reading glasses or bifocals. Now, researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Nov. 7 find that the same goes for bonobos, one of human's closest primate relatives along with chimpanzees, even though they obviously don't read. (2016-11-07)

Playing a conversation game may encourage advance care planning
Few people may want to spend a Saturday night planning their end-of-life care, but playing a game designed to spur conversation about advance care planning may be a more enjoyable way to ease into the process, according to researchers. (2017-10-11)

Eye exams linked to kids' reading levels
Elementary school children who read below grade level may have challenges with their eyesight even if standard tests show they see 20/20, according to a new study from the University of Waterloo. (2018-02-15)

New research into letter-spacing could help improve children's reading
Increased letter spacing helps individuals read faster, but not due to visual processing, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2018-03-19)

Success is not just how you play your cards, but how you play your opponents
Poker-playing techniques can apply to strategies in many situations. Study can influence scientific approaches to negotiation (2018-06-15)

Upper-class people have trouble recognizing others' emotions
Upper-class people have more educational opportunities, greater financial security, and better job prospects than people from lower social classes, but that doesn't mean they're more skilled at everything. A new study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, finds surprisingly, that lower-class people are better at reading the emotions of others. (2010-11-22)

Mothers and infants connect through song
Research from UM Frost School of Music provides insight into the importance of song for infants and mothers. (2017-02-16)

Boys could benefit from greater numbers of girls in schools
Boys are more likely to perform well in schools with a higher proportion of girls, shedding new light on why girls continue to outperform boys in many educational subjects. (2017-11-10)

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