Popular Resuscitation News and Current Events

Popular Resuscitation News and Current Events, Resuscitation News Articles.
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When a child's heart stops, onset time of abnormal rhythms is crucial
Ventricular fibrillation, the life-threatening disordered heart rhythms that may accompany full cardiac arrest, occurs more frequently in children than commonly believed, according to a large national pediatric study. Furthermore, not all ventricular fibrillation (VF) is the same. VF is more often fatal if it is not the initial heart rhythm detected at the start of cardiac arrest, but instead develops later during the arrest, typically during resuscitation. (2006-05-31)

A new algorithm designed to make cardiopulmonary resuscitation more effective
Researchers in the UPV/EHU's Signal and Communications Group in collaboration with researchers in the Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) have developed an algorithm to guide an effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation manoeuvre. Based on chest acceleration, it calculates the depth and frequency at which the chest compressions are being performed. The prestigious PLOS ONE journal reports on the research by publishing a validation of the algorithm with acceleration signals recorded during actual instances of cardiorespiratory arrest. (2018-03-15)

Penn study finds men are more likely to receive CPR in public than women
When it comes to your likelihood of receiving bystander CPR if you experience a Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) in public, it turns out your gender may play a lifesaving role. According to a new study from researchers in the Center for Resuscitation Science at Penn Medicine, which is being presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2017, men are more likely to receive bystander CPR in public than women. (2017-11-11)

New study by Ben-Gurion Univerisity researchers shows female physician bias in ICU admissions
According to the findings, female physicians admitted approximately 20 percent fewer of their female patients to the ICU than did male physicians, and 12 percent fewer female patients than male patients to the intensive cardiac care unit. (2018-02-07)

Smartphone app directs first responders to cardiac arrest three minutes before ambulance
A novel smartphone application (app) has been developed that can direct first responders to cardiac arrest victims more than three minutes before the emergency services arrive. Each minute increases the chance of survival by 10%. (2017-06-19)

New in the Hastings Center Report
What happens when physicians and surrogate decision-makers disagree about what is best for a patient? Two articles and four commentaries explore this question in the January-February 2017 issue. (2017-01-17)

Black infants may have higher cardiac arrest rates
Black infants were significantly more likely to suffer cardiac arrest than White or Hispanic children in a review of emergency response records in the Houston area. (2018-11-05)

Cardiac arrest survival higher in states with required high school CPR training
Required CPR education in high school may lead to higher bystander CPR and cardiac arrest survival rates, according to preliminary research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Resuscitation Science Symposium 2018 -- an international conference highlighting the best in cardiovascular resuscitation research. (2018-11-05)

Findings of game-changing EMS airway study to be presented at SAEM18
Endotracheal intubation (ETI) is the most common advanced airway technique used in the resuscitation of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), but Supraglottic airway devices such as the King Laryngeal Tube (LT) offer simpler airway management alternatives. A Plenary Session to be held May 16, on opening day of SAEM18 in Indianapolis, will present the findings of a multicenter, pragmatic clinical trial comparing the effectiveness of initial LT insertion versus initial ETI upon outcomes in adult OHCA. (2018-05-02)

Use of statins before cardiac arrest may aid survival afterwards
Patients who have been using cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins fare better after a cardiac arrest than non-users. Among subgroups of patients who use statins preventively, those with Type 2 diabetes see the greatest benefit after a cardiac arrest. (2016-11-12)

Population health impact of infants born small for gestational age in low- and middle-income countries
Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital and CHERG used the first international, multi-ethnic birth weight standard, known as the INTERGROWTH-21st, to describe the global burden of suboptimal fetal growth. (2017-08-18)

Understanding heart disease, stroke in women remains a scientific research priority
The February 2021 issue of Circulation, published online today, features new clinical trial research, state of the art reviews and scientific perspectives exploring the unique challenges women face in their fight against heart disease and stroke. The journal received more than 100 manuscripts for consideration this year, the most ever in the five years the current editorial board has published a special Go Red for Women issue. (2021-02-16)

More cardiac arrest victims could survive with dispatcher CPR instruction, rescue breaths for children
More people will survive cardiac arrest if emergency medical dispatchers give chest compression-only CPR instructions over the phone and if infants and children receive chest compressions with rescue breaths, according to updated CPR guidelines published today by the American Heart Association (Association), the world's leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease. (2017-11-07)

Do Democrat and Republican doctors treat patients differently at the end of life?
Despite deep rifts in health care opinions across party lines, a physician's party affiliation appears to have no effect on clinical decisions in end-of-life care. Researchers found no cross-party differences among physicians in their choice of care protocols, including the intensity of life-sustaining treatments, among terminally ill patients. (2018-04-11)

Intranasal ketamine has more minor side effects than intranasal fentanyl in children with acute pain
Minor adverse events (e.g., bad taste in the mouth and dizziness) occur more frequently with intranasal ketamine than with intranasal fentanyl in children with suspected extremity fractures. (2017-11-22)

How to implement Advance Care Planning for patients
International recommendations for patient care in the last days of life have been drawn up by researchers. Emeritus Professor Sheila Payne from the International Observatory on End of Life Care at Lancaster University helped conduct the study commissioned by the European Association for Palliative Care and published in The Lancet Oncology. (2017-09-05)

Men more likely to receive bystander CPR in public than women
Men are more likely to receive bystander CPR in public locations compared to women, and they are more likely to survive after the life-saving measure, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians. (2017-11-11)

One in five witness someone collapse who requires CPR but the majority do not act
An estimated one in five adults in the UK witness someone collapse who needs immediate CPR, yet the majority of people do not act, according to new research funded by the British Heart Foundation. Researchers at the University of Warwick carried out a survey of 2,000 people across the country to find out how likely people are to witness a life-threatening cardiac arrest. (2017-10-15)

Trauma research funding needed now more than ever, say experts
Funding for trauma research is needed now more than ever, and should become a priority in the wake of so many lives lost at mass casualty events -- including most recently at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Florida, say experts in an opinion piece published in the online journal Trauma Surgery & Acute Care Open. (2016-07-06)

Sudden cardiac arrest in athletes: Prevention and management
It's marathon season, and every so often a news report will focus on an athlete who has collapsed from sudden cardiac arrest. Although uncommon, these events get attention. A new review in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) looks at recent evidence to help physicians prevent and manage the risk of sudden cardiac arrest in competitive athletes. (2019-07-15)

CPR from bystanders associated with better outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in pediatrics
Receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation from a bystander -- compared with not -- was associated with better overall and neurologically favorable survival for children and adolescents who had out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, according to an article published online by JAMA Pediatrics. The study is being presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2016. (2016-11-12)

Society for Academic Emergency Medicine announces Annual Meeting plenary speakers
Emergency medicine academicians in six plenary presentations will explore a variety of subjects related to the practice of emergency medicine during a special plenary session to be held on the opening day of SAEM18--the annual meeting for the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) and the largest forum for the presentation of original education and research in academic emergency medicine. (2018-05-02)

Pig experiment raises ethical questions around brain damage
The brain is more resilient than previously thought. In a groundbreaking experiment published in this week's issue of Nature, neuroscientists created an artificial circulation system that successfully restored some functions and structures in pig brains. The result challenges the notion that mammalian brains are fully and irreversibly damaged by a lack of oxygen. (2019-04-18)

Improved CPR training could save more lives, research finds
This Scientific Statement addresses gaps in resuscitation training that lead to flat survival rates for cardiac arrest victims. Standardized online and in-person courses are falling short and not always implemented to optimize retention and mastery. The statement examines best practices in education and applies the learning in new resuscitation science, offering suggestions for improvement in training on eight key elements. (2018-06-21)

Automatic external defibrillators save lives in amateur sports and fitness centers
Automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) save lives in amateur sports and fitness centers, according to research presented at ESC Congress today. The 18-year study found that survival from cardiac arrest reached 93 percent in centers equipped with an AED. (2017-08-27)

Fewer cardiac arrest victims get bystander CPR in Latino neighborhoods
Bystander CPR is provided less frequently in Latino neighborhoods compared to other areas. Cardiac arrest victims in the most heavily Latino-populated neighborhoods were almost 40 percent less likely to survive until discharge from the hospital. (2018-11-05)

Higher lifetime risk of sudden cardiac death among African Americans may be associated with income and education disparities
African Americans have a much higher lifetime risk of sudden cardiac death than whites, especially among women. The lifetime risk was double overall and three times higher in African American women compared to white women. Disparities in income and education, as well as hypertension, diabetes, and other risk factors, accounted for much of the difference in risk. (2019-02-04)

Surviving sepsis campaign update focuses on critical first hour
For patients with sepsis, a serious infection causing widespread inflammation, immediate treatment is essential to improve the chances of survival. An updated 'Hour-1 Bundle' of the international, evidence-based guidelines for treatment of sepsis is introduced in the June issue of Critical Care Medicine. The official journal of the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), Critical Care Medicine is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2018-05-17)

One-quarter of patients with severe congestive heart failure do not want to be resusitated, Yale study finds
Although resuscitation is often used with patients suffering from severe congestive heart failure, nearly one in four of those patients who were hospitalized said they did not wish to be resuscitated if their hearts stopped beating, according to a study in the Aug. l8 issue of Circulation. (1998-08-17)

Cardiac arrest patients do better if taken immediately to a specialist heart center
People who suffer cardiac arrest outside of hospital have a better chance of survival if they are taken immediately to a specialist heart center rather than to the nearest general hospital, according to research published in the European Heart Journal. The study found that distance needed to travel to a specialist heart center was not linked to better or worse risk of death. (2017-03-28)

Timing resuscitation compressions using the song 'La Macarena' or using a smartphone app improve compression quality
New research presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia congress in Copenhagen, Denmark shows that the quality of chest compressions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can be improved by using either a smartphone app or by using the song 'La Macarena' as a mental memory aid. (2018-06-01)

Two novel studies explore why women receive less CPR from bystanders
Separate studies explore why women are less likely to receive bystander CPR. A small survey found that people may worry that chest compressions by bystanders will seem improper or may hurt women A virtual reality study found that even female avatars were less likely to receive CPR from bystanders in a virtual simulation. (2018-11-05)

Patients undergoing out-of-hospital cardiac arrest do not benefit from ACLS during transport
There is no association between prehospital advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) and survival to hospital discharge in patients suffering from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. ACLS is, however, associated with an improvement in prehospital return of spontaneous circulation, but with longer delays to hospital arrival. (2017-09-25)

More Oregonians sharing end-of-life wishes with POLST
More Oregonians are making their end-of-life wishes known through forms known as Physician Order for Life-Sustaining Treatment, or POLST, according to research in the Journal of Palliative Medicine. Researchers also found how people are using the form is changing. (2018-11-28)

Swimming lessons do not increase drowning risk in young children
Providing very young children with swimming lessons appears to have a protective effect against drowning and does not increase children's risk of drowning, reported researchers at the National Institutes of Health. (2009-03-02)

Anyone can save a life: Penn researchers lead national efforts to improve CPR quality
Studies show that only 15 to 30 percent of sudden cardiac arrest victims receive bystander CPR before emergency personnel arrive. But chances for survival plummet as minutes tick by without any blood circulating through the body. Early bystander CPR, however, doubles to triples survival rates. Penn doctors are using a multi-pronged approach, combining new technology with best clinical practices, to boost CPR quality in the community and across the nation. (2008-01-14)

Sphingotec's endothelial function biomarker bio-ADM® improves risk stratification of sepsis patients at ICUs
New study data show that monitoring blood levels of sphingotec's endothelial function biomarker bio-ADM® on top of guideline parameter lactate improves risk stratification of sepsis patients admitted to intensive care units. (2020-03-05)

Avalanche Victims: When can rewarming lead to survival?
It is difficult for doctors to accurately assess avalanche victims who arrive at hospital suffering cardiac arrest: has the patient effectively suffocated, or is there a realistic prospect of survival if the patient is properly rewarmed? The correct initial assessment is crucial: it ensures that patients with a viable chance of survival are properly rewarmed, while also preventing unnecessary medical intervention in cases where survival is not possible. (2019-05-28)

New CPR promises better results by compressing abdomen, not Chest
A biomedical engineer at Purdue University has developed a new method to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation that promises to be more effective than standard CPR because it increases nourishing blood flow through the heart by 25 percent over the current method. (2007-09-05)

Emergency video telemedicine positively impacts newborn resuscitation
Approximately 10 percent of newborns require help breathing after birth, and 1 in 1,000 newborns require more intensive resuscitation measures. These infrequent, high-risk deliveries may present challenges to community hospitals less familiar with advanced newborn resuscitation interventions. Telemedicine consultations are a good option to help meet these challenges and positively impact patient care, according to a study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2016-11-22)

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