Popular Retina News and Current Events

Popular Retina News and Current Events, Retina News Articles.
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A new generation of artificial retinas based on 2D materials
Scientists report they have successfully developed and tested the world's first ultrathin artificial retina that could vastly improve on existing implantable visualization technology for the blind. The flexible 2-D material-based device could someday restore sight to the millions of people with retinal diseases. The researchers will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2018-08-20)

AI algorithms detect diabetic eye disease inconsistently
In a paper published Jan. 5 in Diabetes Care, researchers compared seven algorithms to detect diabetic retinopathy against the diagnostic expertise of retina specialists. (2021-01-05)

Finding a cell's true identity
In a bid to reveal even more distinctive differences and similarities, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, the Johns Hopkins Institute for Genetic Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Department of Neuroscience developed two new artificial intelligence methods that decipher complex gene activity controlling cell fate decisions in retina development and relate this gene activity to what occurs in other tissues and across different species. (2019-05-28)

Deep-sea fish reveals twilight trick
A new type of cell has been found in the eye of a deep-sea fish, and scientists say the discovery opens a new world of understanding about vision in a variety of light conditions. University of Queensland scientists found the new cell type in the deep-sea pearlside fish (Maurolicus spp.), which have an unusual visual system adapted for twilight conditions. (2017-11-08)

Study shows how light therapy might help premature babies avoid vision problems
Scientists discovered a light-dependent molecular pathway that regulates how blood vessels develop in the eye. The findings in Nature Cell Biology suggest it may be possible to use light therapy to help premature infants whose eyes are still developing avoid vision problems. The novel molecular process helps ensure blood-vessel development in the eye is appropriately balanced to prepare it for visual function. (2019-04-01)

Annoyed by floating specks in your vision? You may soon be able to zap them away
Millions of people who put up with seeing annoying specks drift through their field of vision may now have a safe, high-tech solution to their problem. A study of patients who had laser treatment to vaporize these flecks and spots known as floaters, showed a very low complication rate, according to research presented today at AAO 2017, the 121st Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. (2017-11-13)

How the color-changing hogfish 'sees' with its skin
The hogfish can go from white to reddish in milliseconds as it adjusts to shifting conditions in the ocean. Scientists have long suspected that animals with quick-changing colors don't just rely on their eyes to tune their appearance to their surroundings -- they also sense light with their skin. But exactly how remains a mystery. A study reveals that hogfish skin senses light differently from eyes. (2018-03-12)

Air pollution linked to higher glaucoma risk
Living in a more polluted area is associated with a greater likelihood of having glaucoma, a debilitating eye condition that can cause blindness, finds a new UCL-led study in the UK. People in neighbourhoods with higher amounts of fine particulate matter pollution were at least 6% more likely to report having glaucoma than those in the least-polluted areas, according to the findings published in Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science. (2019-11-25)

New instrument lets doctors view the entire eye with unprecedented level of detail
Researchers have developed the first instrument that can provide a detailed image of the entire eye that can produce higher quality images than currently available. (2018-01-18)

Lipid nanoparticles for gene therapy
Twenty-five years have passed since the publication of the first work on solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) as a system for delivering drugs. So the European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics has prepared a special edition for which it asked the PharmaNanoGene group of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country to produce a piece of work. (2017-02-14)

Likely new treatment target identified for diabetic retinopathy
In oxygen-compromising conditions like diabetes, the body grows new blood vessels to help, but the result is often leaky, dysfunctional vessels that make bad matters worse. Now scientists have identified a new target for reducing that dysfunctional blood vessel development in the eye in a common condition called diabetic retinopathy, the leading cause of blindness in working-age adults. (2017-10-10)

Retina transplants show promise in patients with retinal degeneration
Preliminary research shows encouraging results with transplantation of retinal cells in patients with blindness caused by retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration, according to a report in the August issue of American Journal of Ophthalmology. (2008-07-10)

Biomarkers facilitate early detection of glaucoma
Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have identified new potential biomarkers that may facilitate early detection of glaucoma in patients. Moreover, they ascertained that the mutation of a certain gene in mice causes intraocular pressure elevation. This, in turn, is one of the main risk factors for glaucoma. (2018-10-25)

Age-related macular degeneration before and after the era of anti-VEGF drugs
In a study of nearly 650 people with the eye disease age-related macular degeneration (AMD), half still had vision 20/40 or better, typically good enough to drive or to read standard print, after five years of treatment with anti-VEGF drugs that are injected into the eye. The authors of the study, funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI) at the National Institutes of Health, say those outcomes would have been unimaginable about 10 years ago, prior to the drugs' availability. (2016-05-02)

Jumping spiders court in color
UC biologist discovers unique visual diversities for rare color vision in two groups of jumping spiders. (2017-01-25)

Eye changes may signal frontotemporal lobe degeneration
Frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) is a progressive neurodegenerative condition that is present in tens of thousands of Americans, but is often difficult to diagnose accurately. Now in a study published this week online ahead of print in Neurology, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have found evidence that a simple eye exam and retinal imaging test may help improve that accuracy. (2017-09-08)

Dormant cytomegalovirus resides in eyes of healthy mice long after infection
Infection with cytomegalovirus triggers long-lasting eye inflammation and establishes a dormant pool of the virus in the eyes of mice with healthy immune systems, according to new research presented in PLOS Pathogens by Valentina Voigt of the Lions Eye Institute in Western Australia and colleagues. (2018-05-31)

Scientists successfully awaken sleeping stem cells
Scientists at Schepens Eye Research Institute have discovered what chemical in the eye triggers the dormant capacity of certain non-neuronal cells to transform into progenitor cells, a stem-like cell that can generate new retinal cells. The discovery, published in the March issue of Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, offers new hope to victims of diseases that harm the retina, such as macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. (2008-03-18)

New research: Eyes of adolescents could reveal risk of cardiovascular disease
New research has found that poorer well-being or 'health-related quality of life' (HRQoL) in adolescence could be an indicator of future cardiovascular disease risk. Researchers at The Westmead Institute for Medical Research found that adolescents with poorer scores in the social and mental well-being domains of HRQoL have structural changes in their retinal blood vessels that could be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in later life. (2018-04-19)

Overlooked cell key player in preventing age-related vision loss
Researchers have pinpointed a new therapeutic target for macular degeneration, an eye disease that affects over 10 million Americans and is the leading cause of blindness in adults over 60. The findings show that tree-shaped retinal cells called Müller glia play a key role in preventing degenerative vision loss in rats. (2018-03-06)

Genome surgery for eye disease moves closer to reality
Researchers from Columbia University have developed a new technique for the powerful gene editing tool CRISPR to restore retinal function in mice afflicted by a degenerative retinal disease, retinitis pigmentosa. (2018-05-11)

Genetic insights may explain retinal growth, eye cancer
Investigators at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have discovered the role of several key genes in the development of the retina, and in the process have taken a significant step toward understanding how to prevent or cure the potentially deadly eye cancer retinoblastoma. (2006-05-08)

St. Jude defines eye cancer gene's role in retinal development
A genetic discovery led by scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital helps answer a long-standing mystery about the eyes of vertebrates, and may translate into a deeper understanding of how genes coordinate the complex process of eye formation and how a rare pediatric eye cancer progresses. (2008-01-16)

Stem cells treat macular degeneration
UCSB researchers helped develop a specially engineered retinal patch to treat people with sudden, severe sight loss. (2018-03-19)

Stimuli fading away en route to consciousness
Whether or not we consciously perceive the stimuli projected onto our retina is decided in our brain. A recent study by the University of Bonn shows how some signals dissipate along the processing path to conscious perception. This process begins at rather late stages of signal processing. By contrast, in earlier stages there is hardly any difference in the reaction of neurons to conscious and unconscious stimuli. The paper is published in Current Biology. (2017-09-22)

Improving longevity of functionally integrated stem cells in regenerative vision therapy
One of the challenges in developing stem cell therapies is ensuring that transplanted cells can survive long enough to work. Buck Institute researchers report one of the first demonstrations of long-term vision restoration in blind mice by transplanting photoreceptors derived from human stem cells and blocking the immune response that causes transplanted cells to be rejected. The findings support a path to improving clinical applications in restoring human vision lost to degenerative eye diseases. (2017-01-12)

Study finds biomarker that predicts who responds best to common diabetic complication
Researchers at St. Michael's Hospital have found a biomarker from fluid in the eye that predicts which patients will respond best to current treatments for diabetic macular edema, one of the most common complications of diabetes. (2018-03-08)

Researchers test stem cell-based retinal implant for common cause of vision loss
Physicians and researchers at the USC Roski Eye Institute have collaborated with other California institutions to show that a first-in-kind stem cell-based retinal implant is feasible for use in people with advanced dry age-related macular degeneration. (2018-04-04)

Important step towards a computer model that predicts the outcome of eye diseases
Understanding how the retina transforms images into signals that the brain can interpret would not only result in insights into brain computations, but could also be useful for medicine. As machine learning and artificial intelligence develop, eye diseases will soon be described in terms of the perturbations of computations performed by the retina. A newly developed model of the retina can predict with high precision the outcome of a defined perturbation. (2018-06-22)

New research findings may help stop age-related macular degeneration at the molecular level
Researchers at University College London say they have gleaned a key insight into the molecular beginnings of age-related macular degeneration, the No. 1 cause of vision loss in the elderly, by determining how two key proteins interact to naturally prevent the onset of the condition. (2010-01-04)

First 'pathoconnectome' could point toward new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases
Scientists from the John A. Moran Eye Center at the University of Utah have achieved another first in the field of connectomics, which studies the synaptic connections between neurons. The lab has produced the first pathoconnectome, showing how eye disease alters retinal circuitry. (2020-09-29)

A drug to treat retinal diseases with drops instead of injections
The Spanish firm Sylentis has developed a compound to treat diseases of the retina, such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy, which will be administered by ophthalmic drops instead of intraocular injections. The drug, which has been tested in animals, is a small interfering RNA capable of penetrating the cells of the retina and blocking the formation of new blood vessels. (2017-12-12)

Atomic-resolution views suggest function of enzyme that regulates light-detecting signals in eye
An atomic resolution view of an enzyme found only in the eye is providing clues about how the enzyme is activated. The enzyme, PDE6, is critical to the way light entering the retina is converted into signals to the brain. (2008-10-07)

Changes of the cell environment are associated with certain eye diseases
In case of ischemic injury to the retina, changes occur in the protein scaffold in the environment of retinal cells, the so-called extracellular matrix. Various eye diseases, such as glaucoma, are associated with such ischemic events. Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum describe how the extracellular matrix is affected by these processes in the journal Scientific Reports. (2017-03-15)

Why too much DNA repair can injure tissue
MIT researchers have discovered how overactive DNA repair systems can lead to retinal damage and blindness in mice. A DNA repair enzyme called Aag glycosylase becomes hyperactive, provoking an inflammatory response that produces necrosis, leading to severe tissue damage. (2019-02-12)

Over-the-counter laser pointers a threat to eyesight
Some laser pointers that can be bought over the counter are unsafe -- to the point that they can cause blindness. (2016-08-18)

New model for hard-to-study form of blindness paves way for future research
URMC researchers have created the first patient-derived laboratory model of macular degeneration, the leading cause of vision loss in older adults. With the new model, the team has identified possible drug targets for the disease, which they hope will help lead to an effective treatment. (2017-09-06)

Organic printing inks may restore sight to blind people
A simple retinal prosthesis is being developed in collaboration between Tel Aviv University in Israel and Linköping University in Sweden. Fabricated using cheap and widely-available organic pigments used in printing inks and cosmetics, it consists of tiny pixels like a digital camera sensor on a nanometric scale. Researchers hope that it can restore sight to blind people. (2018-05-02)

Potential new approaches to treating eye diseases
Potential new approaches to treating eye diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are described in a new study published in the February Journal of Experimental Medicine. Hongkang Xi, Menno van Lookeren Campagne, and colleagues discovered that a signaling protein, or cytokine, called IL-33, plays a key role in recruiting phagocytes to damaged retina and induces retinal degeneration. Blocking the IL-33 receptor inhibits this process and prevents injury-induced retinal degeneration. (2016-02-04)

Safety study indicates gene therapy for blindness improves vision
No significant adverse effects were reported during a safety trial testing gene therapy on three patients with a type of hereditary blindness called Leber congenital amaurosis type 2. In addition, the subjects said the vision in their treated eyes was slightly improved in dim lighting conditions. The study was conducted by the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Florida with support from the National Eye Institute. (2008-09-08)

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