Popular Retina News and Current Events | Page 2

Popular Retina News and Current Events, Retina News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
Safety study indicates gene therapy for blindness improves vision
No significant adverse effects were reported during a safety trial testing gene therapy on three patients with a type of hereditary blindness called Leber congenital amaurosis type 2. In addition, the subjects said the vision in their treated eyes was slightly improved in dim lighting conditions. The study was conducted by the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Florida with support from the National Eye Institute. (2008-09-08)

Modeling the most common form of vision loss in older adults
Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of vision loss in people older than 50. University of Pennsylvania biochemist Kathleen Boesze-Battaglia and colleagues have developed a model system that mimics many features of the human condition, giving scientists a platform to gain a deeper understanding of risk factors and possible treatments. (2018-11-21)

Scallop eyes mirror reflecting telescopes, with sophisticated optical properties
Researchers have obtained a detailed view of a scallop's visual system -- a sophisticated arrangement of up to 200 eyes they say is strikingly similar to a reflecting telescope. (2017-11-30)

In the eye of the medulloblastoma
Can genes normally expressed only in the eye be activated in brain tumors? Such a phenomenon, though surprising, has been observed in certain types of medulloblastoma, pediatric tumors of the cerebellum. Researchers from the CNRS, Institut Curie, Inserm and Université Paris-Sud, together with colleagues at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, have pinpointed the role of these genes in the tumor process, thus offering new therapeutic targets. (2018-03-12)

Financial decisions influenced by intensity of light
A study of more than 2,500 people provides new evidence about the effects of luminance on the quality and consistency of our financial decision-making. (2017-08-04)

The birth of vision, from the retina to the brain
How do neurons differentiate to become individual components of the visual system? Researchers (UNIGE and EPFL), have identified the genetic programmes governing the birth of different types of retinal cells and their capacity to wire to the correct part of the brain, where they transmit visual information. In addition, the discovery of several genes regulating nerve growth allows for the possibility of a boost to optic nerve regeneration in the event of neurodegenerative disease. (2019-09-09)

Zinc: A surprise target in regenerating the optic nerve after injury
For more than two decades, researchers have tried to regenerate the injured optic nerve using different growth factors and/or agents that overcome natural growth inhibition. But at best, these approaches get only about 1 percent of the injured nerve fibers to regenerate and reconnect to the brain; most of the cells eventually die. (2017-01-02)

NIH scientists combine technologies to view the retina in unprecedented detail
By combining two imaging modalities -- adaptive optics and angiography -- investigators at the National Eye Institute (NEI) can see live neurons, epithelial cells, and blood vessels deep in the eye's light-sensing retina. Resolving these tissues and cells in the outermost region of the retina in such unprecedented detail promises to transform the detection and treatment of diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness among the elderly. (2018-11-14)

Amblyopia, not strabismus, identified as key contributor to slow reading in school-age children
Children with amblyopia, commonly known as 'lazy eye,' may have impaired ocular motor function. This can result in difficulties in activities for which sequential eye movements are important, such as reading. A new study conducted at the Retina Foundation of the Southwest determined that children with amblyopia read more slowly than children with normal vision or with strabismus alone. Their findings are published in the Journal of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. (2015-11-23)

Immune cells in the retina can spontaneously regenerate
Immune cells called microglia can completely repopulate themselves in the retina after being nearly eliminated, according to a new study in mice from scientists at the National Eye Institute (NEI). (2018-03-21)

Study provides further insight into how Ebola affects the eye
A new study, conducted by the researchers from the University of Liverpool, published in JAMA Ophthalmology identifies the specific characteristics of Ebola retinal lesions, which provide further clues as to how the virus travels to the retina and causes damage. (2018-05-15)

Heating techniques could improve treatment of macular degeneration
Age-related macular degeneration is the primary cause of central vision loss and results in the center of the visual field being blurred or fully blacked out. Though treatable, some methods can be ineffective or cause unwanted side effects. (2019-11-23)

Biologists find new source for brain's development
A team of biologists has found an unexpected source for the brain's development, a finding that offers new insights into the building of the nervous system. (2017-08-31)

Researchers have identified areas of the retina that change in mild Alzheimer's disease
Finding biomarkers that enable early detection of Alzheimer's disease is one of medicine's biggest challenges, and the retina is one of the most promising candidates. For the first time, a research team at the Complutense University of Madrid has identified the exact shape, size and location of the areas affected by the disease in each retinal layer, analysing changes in thickness that occur in mildly affected patients. (2019-09-13)

Noninvasive eye scan could detect key signs of Alzheimer's years before patients show symptoms
Cedars-Sinai neuroscience investigators have found that Alzheimer's disease affects the retina -- the back of the eye -- similarly to the way it affects the brain. The study also revealed that an investigational, noninvasive eye scan could detect the key signs of Alzheimer's disease years before patients experience symptoms. (2017-08-17)

Here is the perfect spot for a birds' inner compass
Migratory birds use a magnetic compass in their eye for navigation. Its basic sensory mechanisms have long remained elusive, but now researchers reveal exactly where in the eye, the birds' control center for navigation is situated. (2018-02-07)

New mutations causing inherited deaf-blindness have been discovered
A team of scientists from Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (MSMU) together with their colleagues from leading scientific centers of Moscow and India described a number of genetic mutations causing Usher syndrome (inherited deaf-blindness). They found previously unstudied unique mutations in investigated DNA regions. The results of the study were published in the Ophthalmic Genetics journal. (2019-01-22)

Researchers found novel structure in the 'antennae' of light-sensing neurons
Antennae-like structures on photoreceptors have a unique feature not observed in the 'antennae' or cilia of other types of cells, that helps explain non-syndromic blindness. (2018-06-13)

Unexpected finding may deter disabling diabetic eye disease
A new Michigan State University study is the first to find that a particular type of lipid, or fat, thought to only exist in the skin, now lives in your eye and might play a major role in deterring diabetic retinopathy. (2018-04-06)

New target could help protect vision following optic nerve trauma
When a car crash or explosion results in an optic nerve injury, eliminating an enzyme known to promote inflammation appears to aid recovery, scientists report. (2019-02-11)

Researchers identify key compounds to resolve abnormal vascular growth in AMD
A compound of specific bioactive products from a major family of enzymes reduced the severity of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in a preclinical model, according to a new study led by Massachusetts Eye and Ear researchers. (2017-08-21)

A closer look at the eye
URMC researchers have developed a new imaging technique that allowed the first glimpse of individual cells in the retina, a layer of tissue at the back of the eye. The new technique could allow earlier diagnosis and treatment for diseases like glaucoma and prevent vision loss caused by death of these retinal cells. (2017-01-02)

Google's AI program: Building better algorithms for detecting eye disease
The ability of artificial intelligence to help screen patients for a common diabetic eye disease gains momentum with a new study published online today in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Lily Peng, M.D., Ph.D., and her colleagues at Google AI research group, show they could improve their disease-detecting software by using a small subset of images adjudicated by ophthalmologists who specialize in retinal diseases. (2018-03-13)

Nanotechnology makes it possible for mice to see in infrared
Mice with vision enhanced by nanotechnology were able to see infrared light as well as visible light, reports a study published Feb. 28 in the journal Cell. A single injection of nanoparticles in the mice's eyes bestowed infrared vision for up to 10 weeks with minimal side effects, allowing them to see infrared light even during the day and with enough specificity to distinguish between different shapes. (2019-02-28)

WVU researcher explores what tumor cells and a healthy retina have in common
West Virginia University researcher Jianhai Du is parsing how the retina hijacks an energy-producing chemical reaction to churn out molecular building blocks to renew photoreceptor membranes that keep our vision sharp. His findings are published in the latest edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2019-02-21)

Gene therapy shows promise for reversing blindness
Most causes of untreatable blindness occur due to loss of the millions of light sensitive photoreceptor cells that line the retina, similar to the pixels in a digital camera. (2017-10-02)

Birds categorize colors just like humans do
For a reddish-beaked bird called the zebra finch, sexiness is color-coded. Males have beaks that range from light orange to dark red. But to females, a male's colored bill may simply be hot, or not, findings suggest. Due to a phenomenon called categorical perception, zebra finches partition the range of hues from red to orange into two discrete categories, much like humans do, researchers report in the journal Nature. (2018-08-01)

Therapy could improve and prolong sight in those suffering vision loss
Ganglion cells in the eye generate noise as the light-sensitive photoreceptors die in diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa. Now, UC Berkeley neurobiologists have found a drug and gene therapy that can tamp down the noise, improving sight in mice with RP. These therapies could potentially extend the period of useful vision in those with degenerative eye diseases, including, perhaps, age-related macular degeneration. (2019-03-13)

Study finds association between poor diet, age-related macular degeneration
Participants who ate a diet high in red and processed meat, fried food, refined grains and high-fat dairy were three times more likely to develop late-stage age-related macular degeneration. (2019-12-11)

Proteomics and precision medicine
Researchers at the University of Iowa have used personalized proteomics to devise a successful treatment strategy for a patient with uveitis, a potentially blinding eye disease that can have many causes, making it particularly difficult to diagnose and treat effectively. (2016-02-05)

Revolutionizing retinal studies
For decades, scientists hoping to understand how the retina interprets visual input have often had to resort to invasive techniques to dissect the retina from the animal in an effort to record the cells' activity, but a new system developed by Harvard scientists, could make it possible to track the firing patterns of dozens of cells chronically in awake animals. (2018-06-28)

Thyroid hormone regulates development of color vision
By growing human retinal tissue from stem cells, researchers have determined how the various types of cells that enable people to see colors develop. (2018-10-11)

Whole-brain imaging of mice during behavior
In a study published in Neuron, Emilie Macé from Botond Roska's group and collaborators demonstrate how functional ultrasound imaging can yield high-resolution, brain-wide activity maps of mice for specific behaviors. The non-invasive technology has promising applications for ophthalmologic, neurologic and psychiatric diseases. (2018-12-05)

Nanosponges show promise for potentially blinding eye infections
In a new study, researchers demonstrate using a mouse model that engineered nanosponges can be used to protect eyes from infections caused by Enterococcus faecalis. Enterococcus faecalis contain a toxin called cytolysin, which is found in roughly 50 percent of isolates that cause post-operative intraocular infections seen in the United States. (2017-11-22)

Compact depth sensor inspired by spiders
Inspired by jumping spiders, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a compact and efficient depth sensor that could be used on board microrobots, in small wearable devices, or in lightweight virtual and augmented reality headsets. The device combines a multifunctional, flat metalens with an ultra-efficient algorithm to measure depth in a single shot. (2019-10-28)

Gene changes driving myopia reveal new focus for drug development
Myopia (nearsightedness) and hyperopia (farsightedness) develop through different molecular pathways, according to a new study publishing Oct. 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Andrei Tkatchenko of Columbia University and colleagues. The finding provides a new understanding of myopia, the most common form of visual impairment worldwide, and opens the way for development of drugs to prevent it. (2018-10-09)

Restoring vision by gene therapy
Latest scientific findings give hope for people with incurable retinal degeneration. (2020-06-04)

Identifying a gene for canine night blindness
An international team of researchers led by the University of Pennsylvania's Keiko Miyadera has identified the gene mutation responsible for a form of night blindness in dogs. Strategies to treat this condition, which affects a layer of neurons just below the primary photoreceptor cells, could also inform treatment of other diseases that rely on targeting this cell type. (2019-10-03)

Scientists emulate the human blood-retinal barrier on a microfluidic chip
A team of scientists in Barcelona has developed a microfluidic device that mimics the human blood-retinal barrier. It enables to test molecules in vitro and to study diseases such as diabetic retinopathy. (2018-01-23)

Potential predictor of glaucoma damage identified
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a biomarker that appears linked to damage to cells in the retina of the eye. The marker may make it possible to better monitor the progression of glaucoma, as well as the effectiveness of treatment for the blinding disease. (2017-05-04)

Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.