Nav: Home

Popular Rice News and Current Events

Popular Rice News and Current Events, Rice News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Millions may face protein deficiency as a result of human-caused carbon dioxide emissions
If CO2 levels keep rising as projected, the populations of 47 countries may lose more than 5 percent of their dietary protein by 2050 due to a decline in the nutritional value of rice, wheat, and other staple crops, according to Harvard T.H. (2017-08-02)
A case where smoking helped
A mutation in the hemoglobin of a young woman in Germany was found to cause her mild anemia. (2017-02-16)
How to win friends online: It's not which groups you join, but how many
The chances that people will form new friendships primarily depends on the number rather than the types of organizations, groups and cliques they join, according to an analysis of six online social networks by Rice University data scientists. (2018-09-26)
Researchers use wild rice to predict health of Minnesota lakes and streams
By studying wild rice in lakes and streams, a team of researchers led by the University of Minnesota has discovered that sulfate in waterways is converted into toxic levels of sulfide and increases other harmful elements. (2018-01-24)
'Hot' electrons don't mind the gap
Rice University scientists discover that 'hot' electrons can create a photovoltage about a thousand times larger than ordinary temperature differences in nanoscale gaps in gold wires. (2017-05-08)
About 1 million Texans gained health care coverage due to Affordable Care Act
Texas has experienced a roughly 6 percentage-point increase in health insurance coverage from the Affordable Care Act, according to new research by experts at Rice University and the Episcopal Health Foundation. (2016-11-17)
Lettuce show you how to restore oil-soaked soil
Rice University engineers have fine-tuned a method to restore oil-soaked soil to fertility while eliminating toxic hydrocarbons. (2019-02-01)
Quantum dots display promise for polymers
Rice University scientists employ the power of the sun to build functional synthetic polymers using photosensitive, semiconducting quantum dots as a catalyst. (2018-02-08)
Heavy nitrogen molecules reveal planetary-scale tug-of-war
Researchers from Rice University, UCLA, Michigan State and the University of New Mexico have discovered a planetary-scale tug-of-war between life, deep Earth and the upper atmosphere that is expressed in atmospheric nitrogen. (2017-11-17)
Scientists seeking rare river crayfish aren't just kicking rocks
As far as anyone can tell, the cold-water crayfish Faxonius eupunctus makes its home in a 30-mile stretch of the Eleven Point River and nowhere else in the world. (2018-02-27)
Are the late Stephen Hawking's religious beliefs typical of U.K. scientists?
The late Stephen Hawking famously didn't believe in God. Neither does the renowned Richard Dawkins. (2018-12-19)
Filter may be a match for fracking water
A superhydrophilic filter produced by Rice University scientists has proven able to remove more than 90 percent of contaminants from water used in hydraulic fracturing operations at shale oil and gas wells. (2017-09-25)
Small materials poised for big impact in construction
Bricks, blocks, and steel I-beams -- step aside. A new genre of construction materials, made from stuff barely 1/50,000th the width of a human hair, is about to debut in the building of homes, offices, bridges, and other structures. (2010-07-28)
Exotic state of matter: An atom full of atoms
If the electron orbits the nucleus at a great distance, there is plenty of space in between for other atoms. (2018-02-26)
Contaminants in food: Health risks of natural origin are frequently underestimated
Just under 60 percent of the German population view undesirable substances in food as a high or very high health risk. (2017-09-15)
Study IDs 'white graphene' architecture with unprecedented hydrogen storage capacity
Rice University engineers have zeroed in on the optimal architecture for storing hydrogen in 'white graphene' nanomaterials -- a design like a Lilliputian skyscraper with 'floors' of boron nitride sitting one atop another and held by boron nitride pillars. (2018-03-13)
Nutritionally-speaking, soy milk is best plant-based milk
A new study from McGill University looks at the four most-commonly consumed types of milk beverages from plant sources around the world -- almond milk, soy milk, rice milk and coconut milk -- and compares their nutritional values with those of cow's milk. (2018-01-29)
Microengineered slippery rough surface for water harvesting from air
A slippery rough surface (SRS) inspired by both pitcher plants and rice leaves outperforms state-of-the-art liquid-repellent surfaces in water harvesting applications, according to a team of researchers at Penn State and the University of Texas at Dallas. (2018-03-30)
Study boosts hope for cheaper fuel cells
Simulations by Rice University scientists show how carbon nanomaterials may be optimized to replace expensive platinum in cathodes for electricity-generating fuel cells. (2018-01-05)
Biology's need for speed tolerates a few mistakes
In balancing speed and accuracy to duplicate DNA and produce proteins, Rice University researchers find evolution determined that speed is favored much more. (2017-05-02)
Microbial 'cheaters' help scientists ID 'social' genes
The first genome-wide search for genes governing social behavior has found that even the simplest social creatures -- the amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum -- have more than 100 genes that help regulate cooperative behavior. (2008-02-13)
Team training can reduce patient mortality by 13 percent
When implemented correctly, health care team training can reduce patient mortality by 13 percent, according to a new review paper by a psychologist at Rice University. (2018-03-13)
No sweat? That's an issue for home-schooled children
Children schooled at home may not get enough exercise even if they participate in organized sports and physical activities, according to researchers at Rice University. (2019-02-01)
Researchers advance technique to detect ovarian cancer
Researchers refine and run the first in vivo tests that use fluorescent nanotube-based probes to locate specific tumors in the body. (2017-11-30)
Cancer cells steer a jagged path
Researchers at Rice University and the Duke University School of Medicine define the role of a jagged ligand, JAG1, in cancer cells' ability to differentiate and metastasize, making them harder to track down and eliminate. (2019-01-03)
New rice fights off drought
Scientists at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) have developed strains of rice that are resistant to drought in real-world situations. (2017-04-04)
After the fire, charcoal goes against the grain, with the flow
A two-year study of Rice University property damaged by a 2011 forest fire found that charcoal behaved very differently from other forms of soil carbon as the land rebounded from the fire. (2017-12-11)
Patients more likely to accept robotic dentistry for non-invasive procedures
In an online survey of 502 individuals (260 female), participants were 'significantly less willing to undergo more invasive procedures, such as gum surgery and a root canal, and significantly more willing to undergo procedures such as tooth cleaning or whitening performed by a robot,' Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University researchers said. (2018-03-27)
Decellularized muscle grafts support skeletal muscle regeneration to treat tissue loss
A new comparative study showed the advantages of using donor decellularized muscle to promote functional tissue regeneration at the site of bulk skeletal muscle loss due to trauma or surgery. (2018-05-04)
New guide for finding genes linked with behavior
Scientists interested in finding specific genes that influence the behavior of humans and animals have a new tool, thanks to a two-year research effort aimed at describing how to apply the latest techniques of molecular genomics to the study of complex behavior. (2018-02-12)
Rice U. reports progress in pursuit of sickle cell cure
Rice University bioengineer Gang Bao and his colleagues use gene editing to correct the mutation responsible for sickle cell disease in up to 40 percent of patients' cells used for lab testing. (2018-02-16)
Rice U. lab surprised to find its drug-delivery system can help even without drugs
A synthetic, injectable hydrogel developed at Rice University to deliver drugs and encourage tissue growth turns out to have therapeutic properties all its own. (2018-03-13)
Climate change made Harvey rainfall 15 percent more intense
Scientists from World Weather Attribution and Rice University have found that human-caused climate change made the record rainfall that fell over Houston during Hurricane Harvey roughly three times more likely and 15 percent more intense. (2017-12-14)
Swapping where crops are grown could feed an extra 825 million people
Redrawing the global map of crop distribution on existing farmland could help meet growing demand for food and biofuels in coming decades, while significantly reducing water stress in agricultural areas. (2017-11-06)
Little growth observed in India's methane emissions
Methane is the second most powerful greenhouse gas and concentrations are rising in the atmosphere. (2017-10-10)
Geopolitical risks to US oil supply lowest since the early 1970s
The geopolitical risks to the United States' oil supply are the lowest since the early 1970s, due to fracking, climate action and a more diverse global supply, according to a new paper by experts at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy. (2018-01-05)
Nanoscale islands dot light-driven catalyst
Rice University scientists have combined aluminum nanoparticles and smaller metal particles to create a versatile nanostructure that could lead to new applications for plasmonics. (2017-10-04)
New approach to improve nitrogen use, enhance yield, and promote flowering in rice
Using nitrogen fertilizer increases crop yields, but excess runoff causes environmental pollution. (2018-02-23)
Infants who ate rice, rice products had higher urinary concentrations of arsenic
Although rice and rice products are typical first foods for infants, a new study found that infants who ate rice and rice products had higher urinary arsenic concentrations than those who did not consume any type of rice, according to an article published online by JAMA Pediatrics. (2016-04-25)
Epoxy compound gets a graphene bump
Rice University researchers combine epoxy with a tough graphene foam and carbon nanotube scaffold to build a resilient composite that's tougher and as conductive as other compounds but as light as pure epoxy. (2018-11-14)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#SB2 2019 Science Birthday Minisode: Mary Golda Ross
Our second annual Science Birthday is here, and this year we celebrate the wonderful Mary Golda Ross, born 9 August 1908. She died in 2008 at age 99, but left a lasting mark on the science of rocketry and space exploration as an early woman in engineering, and one of the first Native Americans in engineering. Join Rachelle and Bethany for this very special birthday minisode celebrating Mary and her achievements. Thanks to our Patreons who make this show possible! Read more about Mary G. Ross: Interview with Mary Ross on Lash Publications International, by Laurel Sheppard Meet Mary Golda...