Popular Risk Assessment News and Current Events

Popular Risk Assessment News and Current Events, Risk Assessment News Articles.
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American Cancer Society outlines blueprint for cancer control in the 21st century
The American Cancer Society is outlining its vision for cancer control in the decades ahead in a series of articles that forms the basis of a national cancer control plan. (2018-07-10)

More cancer survivors, fewer cancer specialists point to challenge in meeting care needs
An aging population, a growing number of cancer survivors, and a projected shortage of cancer care providers will result in a challenge in delivering the care for cancer survivors in the United States if systemic changes are not made. UNC Lineberger's Deborah K. Mayer, PhD, RN, AOCN, FAAN, and American Cancer Society's Catherine M. Alfano, PhD, published a commentary in JNCI that outlines an approach to address the shortfall. (2019-02-19)

Science for a resilient EU power grid
The Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service, have analysed 16 earthquakes, 15 space weather events and 20 floods, presenting recommendations on how to improve the resilience of the power grid against these natural hazards. (2018-01-04)

Video game system technology helping physical therapists, athletic trainers
Motion-based lab technology can help physical therapists, clinicians and athletic trainers analyze how we move -- it also is very expensive. Some motion labs can cost upward of $100,000. Now, a team of University of Missouri researchers is finding that the depth camera often associated with video game systems can provide a variety of health care providers with objective information to improve patient care. (2017-12-07)

New epidemiological study finds no connection between cases of cancer and use of plant protection products containing glyphosate
BfR Communication No. 036/2017 from 22 December 2017 Epidemiological studies are a central element of public discussion in the debate surrounding the carcinogenic potential of glyphosate. A publication that appeared in the USA in November examined whether there is a possible connection between the use of glyphosate containing plant protection products and cases of cancer among people who work in agriculture using a significantly broader data base. (2018-01-12)

Welfare of zoo animals set to improve
The wellbeing of zoological animals is set to improve following the successful trial of a new welfare assessment grid, a new study in the journal Veterinary Record reports. (2017-09-18)

New screening tool can improve the quality of life for epilepsy patients with sleep apnea
Rutgers researchers have developed a tool to help neurologists screen for obstructive sleep apnea in people with epilepsy whose seizures can be magnified by sleep disorders. (2018-09-27)

Computers equal radiologists in assessing breast density and associated breast cancer risk
Automated breast-density evaluation was just as accurate in predicting women's risk of breast cancer, found and not found by mammography, as subjective evaluation done by radiologists, in a study led by researchers at UC San Francisco and Mayo Clinic. (2018-04-30)

New tool predicts risk of heart attack in older surgery patients
A tool designed to more accurately predict the risk of heart attack in older patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery works significantly better than traditional risk assessment tools. By having more accurate information, older patients and their physicians can make an informed decision on whether to undergo surgery. (2017-11-16)

Parents who had severe trauma, stresses in childhood more likely to have kids with behavioral health problems
A new study finds that severe childhood trauma and stresses early in parents' lives are linked to higher rates of behavioral health problems in their own children. (2018-07-09)

Obesity, other risks play large role in sudden cardiac arrest among the young
Obesity and other common cardiovascular risk factors may play a greater role in sudden cardiac arrest among younger people than previously recognized, underscoring the importance of earlier screening, a Cedars-Sinai study has found. (2018-02-12)

In communicating wildlife conservation, focus on the right message
If you want people to care about endangered species, focus on how many animals are left, not on the chances of a species becoming extinct, according to a new study by Cornell University communication scholars. (2016-10-31)

Together for more food safety in Europe and its neighboring countries
Strawberries from Spain, tomatoes from the Netherlands, spices from Morocco and citrus fruits from Georgia -- the globalization of food production and food trading is posing new challenges for consumer health protection. The range of foods is getting bigger and their safety has to be guaranteed in increasingly more complex supply chains. (2017-11-06)

Breastfeeding may have long-term heart health benefits for some moms
Women with normal blood pressure during pregnancy and who breastfed their babies for at least six months following birth had better markers of cardiovascular health years later compared to women who never breastfed, based on research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session. The same benefits were not observed in women who had high blood pressure during pregnancy. (2018-02-28)

Artificial intelligence used in clinical practice to measure breast density
An artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm measures breast density at the level of an experienced mammographer, according to a new study. The researchers said the study, the result of a collaboration between breast imagers and AI experts, represents a groundbreaking implementation of AI into routine clinical practice. (2018-10-16)

Linking teen driving behaviors to ADHD, other mental health factors
Teen drivers are three times more likely to get into a fatal crash than their more-experienced, older counterparts. Research led by Catherine McDonald and Thomas Power of the University of Pennsylvania, found a link between mistakes these new drivers make and self-reported ADHD and other inattention disorders. (2018-03-30)

Student self-reporting can help educators catch academic and mental health problems early
Stephen Kilgus, an associate professor in the Department of Educational, School and Counseling Psychology in the College of Education at the University of Missouri, is analyzing how a new screening tool, which is completed by students, can help teachers identify potential academic, social and emotional problems. The data might help give teachers better tools to improve children's lives in the classroom and beyond. (2017-11-09)

ECOG-ACRIN discovers a simple blood test may predict recurrence of breast cancer
Late recurrence five+ years after surgery accounts for at least half of all breast cancer recurrences. There are no tests that identify who is at highest risk. ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group researchers studied a blood test for circulating tumor cells, finding that in women cancer-free five after diagnosis, 5% had a positive test, which was associated with a 35% recurrence risk after two years, compared with only 2% with a negative test. Findings require follow-up. (2017-12-08)

Biodiversity loss in forests will be pricey
A new global assessment of forests -- perhaps the largest terrestrial repositories of biodiversity -- suggests that, on average, a 10 percent loss in biodiversity leads to a 2 to 3 percent loss in the productivity, including biomass, that forests can offer. (2016-10-13)

Assessing carbon capture technology
Carbon capture and storage could be used to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and thus ameliorate their impact on climate change. The focus of this technology is on the large-scale reduction of carbon emissions from fossil-fuelled power plants. Research published in the International Journal of Decision Support Systems investigates the pros and cons, assesses the risks associated with carbon capture and provides a new framework for assessing the necessary technology. (2016-02-17)

Scientists use AI to predict biological age based on smartphone and wearables data
Researches at longevity biotech company GERO and Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have developed a computer algorithm that uses Artificial Intelligence to predict biological age and the risk of mortality based on physical activity. The paper is published in Scientific Reports. (2018-03-29)

American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM) takes steps to improve the quality of ultrasound imaging in obstetrics and gynecology
The American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM) convened a forum tasked with developing a roadmap for quality improvement in ultrasound imaging in obstetrics and gynecology and set up a task force to establish a consensus curriculum and competency assessment tools for residency training. The results of these efforts are published simultaneously today in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine, and Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology. (2018-01-03)

Fuzzy logic water quality
A fuzzy logic approach to analyzing water quality could help reduce the number of people in the developing world forced to drink polluted and diseased water for survival, according to a report in a forthcoming issue of the International Journal of Environmental Technology and Management from Inderscience publishers. (2008-04-17)

Biomarkers in breast cancer: IQWiG criticizes conclusion on MINDACT data in US guideline
In their updated guideline, US oncologists recently recommended the MammaPrint test. Researchers from IQWiG have reacted in a letter to the editor in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. (2017-12-27)

Study finds smokers at greater risk of hearing loss
Smoking is associated with increased risk of hearing loss, according to a study of over 50,000 participants over eight years in Nicotine & Tobacco Research, published by Oxford University Press. (2018-03-14)

Pictures in your head -- the secret of beautiful poems
The more a poem evokes vivid sensory imagery, the more we like it. (2017-12-13)

New standards for better water quality in Europe
The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) is due to be revised by 2019. The necessary work process is already in full swing and scientific research is providing important input. In a recent study under the auspices of the UFZ, an international team of researchers formulated recommendations designed to improve the monitoring, assessment and management of pollutants. The study was recently published in the journal Science of the Total Environment. (2017-02-27)

Cancer risk slightly higher for women in discontinued hormone treatment trial
A follow up study of participants in the Women's Health Initiative clinical trial led by a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researcher has found that women who were taking the combined hormone therapy of estrogen plus progestin may have an increased risk of cancer since the intervention was stopped, compared to participants in the trial's placebo group. (2008-03-04)

New prostate cancer risk score could help guide screening decisions
A new score for predicting a man's genetic risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer could help guide decisions about who to screen and when, say researchers in The BMJ today. (2018-01-10)

Warning follows report into online child sexual abuse risk
If the public are serious about wanting to protect children from online sexual abuse more investment in skilled professionals is needed now. The stark warning comes from researchers following publication of a new report commissioned by the Independent Inquiry on Child Sexual Abuse (IICSA) which coincided with the first day of the public hearing into online child sexual abuse. (2018-01-23)

Sustainability criteria for transport biofuels need improvements
In its Renewable Energy Directive, the European Union has set a 10 percent goal for the use of renewable energy in transport by 2020. (2016-06-14)

Newly proposed system of measurement could help determine community sustainability
A newly proposed system of measurement known as the community sustainability assessment system, or CSAS, could be used to define what it means to be a sustainable community as well as evaluate the impact of individual communities on global sustainability, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2019-04-18)

Big Pharma playing system to secure lucrative funding deals in Central Europe
Health research from the University of Bath highlights concerns over transparency and conflicts of interests surrounding pharmaceutical firms operating in Central Europe. (2018-01-11)

High triglycerides, other cholesterol raise risk of stroke
People with high triglycerides and another type of cholesterol tested but not usually evaluated as part of a person's risk assessment have an increased risk of a certain type of stroke, according to research published in the Dec. 26, 2007, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2007-12-26)

Management of mitral regurgitation in a patient contemplating pregnancy
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume 2, Number 4, 2018, pp 439-446(8); DOI: https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2017.0027, researchers Yee-Ping Sun and Patrick T. O'Gara, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass., USA present a case study of management of rheumatic mitral regurgitation in a woman contemplating pregnancy. (2018-04-18)

Gallstone disease may increase heart disease risk
A history of gallstone disease was linked to a 23 percent increased risk of developing coronary heart disease. Preventing gallstone disease may also benefit heart health, say researchers. (2016-08-18)

Contaminants in food: Health risks of natural origin are frequently underestimated
Just under 60 percent of the German population view undesirable substances in food as a high or very high health risk. The most well-known of these substances, which are scientifically denoted as contaminants, are mercury compounds and dioxins. In contrast, only around 13 percent of respondents have heard of the natural contaminants pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) in honey or tea - and only roughly one in three of those who have heard of PAs believe these substances pose a significant health risk. (2017-09-15)

Teens show decreased risk for heart disease later in life after bariatric surgery
Adolescents with severe obesity who had bariatric surgery showed significant improvements in cardiovascular disease risk factors, according to this study. Prior to bariatric surgery, 33 percent of the study participants had three or more defined cardiovascular disease risk factors. However, three years post-surgery only 5 percent of study participants had three or more risk factors; representing significant reduction in the overall likelihood of developing cardiovascular disease later in life. (2018-01-08)

Landslides triggered by Hurricane Maria
Hurricane Maria hit the island of Puerto Rico on 20 September 2017 and triggered more than 40,000 landslides in at least three-fourths of Puerto Rico's 78 municipalities. In a new article from GSA Today, authors Erin Bessette-Kirton and colleagues write that 'the number of landslides that occurred during this event was two orders of magnitude greater than those reported from previous hurricanes.' (2019-02-07)

Harmful algal blooms and water quality
Harmful algal blooms (HABs) occur naturally, but their outbreaks are influenced by climate change and droughts, nutrient enrichment and manmade factors, such as contaminants from sewage and stormwater discharge, natural resource extraction or agricultural runoff, to name a few. An article in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry explores inland surface water quality assessment, research on HABs and management practices in an effort to identify the current challenges and seek solutions to the threats HABs present to public health and the environment. (2015-12-22)

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