Popular Robotic Arm News and Current Events

Popular Robotic Arm News and Current Events, Robotic Arm News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
IMpower131
Patients with Stage IV squamous non-small cell lung cancer enrolled in clinical trial to test the immunotherapy atezolizumab and chemotherapy against chemotherapy alone experienced a longer survival rate, among a subgroup of patients with high PD-LI. (2019-09-10)

Robotic 'gray goo'
Researchers at Columbia Engineering and MIT Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL), demonstrate for the first time a way to make a robot composed of many loosely coupled components, or 'particles.' Unlike swarm or modular robots, each component is simple, and has no individual address or identity. In their system, which the researchers call a 'particle robot,' each particle can perform only uniform volumetric oscillations (slightly expanding and contracting), but cannot move independently. (2019-03-20)

Decoding robotic surgery skills
Researchers from the Keck School of Medicine of USC are looking to technology to help deconstruct expert surgeons' robotic surgery skills so they can create an objective, standardized way to train the next generation of surgeons. (2018-09-11)

Aerial robot that can morph in flight
French researchers have drawn inspiration from birds to design an aerial robot capable of altering its profile during flight. To reduce its wingspan and navigate through tight spaces, it can reorient its arms, which are equipped with propellers that let it fly like a helicopter. It paves the way for a new generation of large robots that can move through narrow passages, making them ideal for exploration as well as search and rescue missions. (2018-05-31)

Maintenance therapy with rucaparib shows clinical responses in a subgroup of patient with pancreatic cancer
Maintenance treatment with the PARP inhibitor rucaparib (Rubraca) was well tolerated and provided clinical responses among patients with advanced BRCA- or PALB2-mutated pancreatic cancer sensitive to platinum-based chemotherapy, according to results from an interim analysis of an ongoing phase II clinical trial presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019, March 29-April 3. (2019-04-02)

Game time: To increase exercise, study shows gaming strategies and a buddy are key
New research shows families who used activity trackers with specially designed gaming elements increased daily step counts by nearly one mile per day and achieved daily fitness goals 27 percent more than families who did not. (2017-10-02)

Robot can pick up any object after inspecting it
MIT CSAIL system suggests that robots could one day be able to 'see' well enough to be in people's homes and offices. (2018-09-10)

Argonne to install Comanche system to explore ARM technology for HPC
Argonne National Laboratory is collaborating with Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) to provide system software expertise and a development ecosystem for a future high-performance computing (HPC) system based on 64-bit ARM processors. (2017-11-17)

Hitgen and Cancer Research UK's Manchester Institute enter license agreement in lung cancer
Cancer Research UK, Cancer Research Technology (CRT), the charity's commercial arm, and HitGen Ltd, a privately held biotech company focused on early drug discovery, announced today that they have entered into a licence agreement to develop a novel class of drugs against lung cancer. (2017-02-27)

Robotic surgery just got more autonomous
Putting surgery one step closer into the realm of self-driving cars and intelligent machines, researchers show for the first time that a supervised autonomous robot can successfully perform soft tissue surgery. (2016-05-04)

Dietary isoflavones linked to increased risk of advanced prostate cancer
Dietary intake of isoflavones was linked with an elevated risk of advanced prostate cancer in a recent International Journal of Cancer study. (2017-11-08)

Muscle vibrations improve control over prosthetic hands
An automated brain-computer interface that vibrates the muscles used for control of prosthetic hands helped three amputees gain better movement control over the prosthetic, according to a new study by Paul Marasco and colleagues. (2018-03-14)

The S-stroke or I-stroke?
The year 2016 is an Olympic year. Developments in high-performance swimwear for swimming continue to advance, along with other areas of scientific research. One area of research has focused on which type of crawl stroke is more effective -- when the arm draws a curve in the water (S-stroke) or moves straight (I-stroke) -- long a matter of debate in the world of competitive swimming. (2016-01-14)

One step closer to understanding explosive sensitivity with molecule design
Explosives have an inherent problem -- they should be perfectly safe for handling and storage but detonate reliably on demand. (2018-04-18)

Yale cancer researchers propose new ways to select patients for clinical trials
Yale Cancer Center investigators have demonstrated in a new study that more sophisticated models to assess patient risk for cancer can result in better clinical trials with more definitive results. (2018-01-25)

Cash for weight loss
A new study, published in the journal Social Science and Medicine, has shown that selling rewards programmes to participants entering a weight loss programme is a low cost strategy to increase both the magnitude and duration of weight loss. A team from the Duke-NUS Medical School (Duke-NUS) and Singapore General Hospital (SGH) led the research, which has implications for insurance companies and employers looking for low cost strategies to improve population health. (2017-06-09)

Consent forms design influences patient willingness to share personal health information
Patients are sometimes asked to share their personal health information for research purposes. Informed consent and trust are critical components in a patient's decision to participate in research. Researchers at the University of Florida conducted a three-arm randomized controlled trial to compare the effects on patient experiences of three electronic consent (e-consent) designs that asked them to share PHI for research purposes. (2021-01-12)

PARP inhibitor improves progression-free survival in patients with advanced breast cancers and BRCA
In a randomized, Phase III trial led by researchers at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, the PARP inhibitor talazoparib extended progression-free survival (PFS) and improved quality-of-life measures over available chemotherapies for patients with metastatic HER2-negative breast cancer and mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes. (2017-12-08)

Robotic weeders: to a farm near you?
The future of weeding is here, and it comes in the form of a robot. Specialty crops such as lettuce, broccoli, tomatoes, and onions may be the first to benefit. (2018-01-10)

Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) fails to extend survival in the SORAMIC study palliative cohort
ILC 2018: The addition of SIRT to sorafenib in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma was associated with no overall survival benefits compared with sorafenib alone, but may offer benefits in some subgroups of patients (2018-04-13)

Speedy collision detector could make robots better human assistants
A faster collision detection algorithm could enable robots to work more fluidly in the operating room or at home for assisted living. The algorithm, dubbed 'Fastron,' runs up to 8 times faster than existing collision detection algorithms. It uses machine learning to help robots avoid moving objects and weave through complex, rapidly changing environments in real time. (2017-11-14)

Terahertz imaging technique reveals subsurface insect damage in wood
Insect infestation is becoming an increasingly costly problem to the forestry industry, especially in areas experiencing increased droughts and hot spells related to climate change. A new terahertz imaging technique could help slow the spread of these infestations by detecting insect damage inside wood before it becomes visible on the outside. (2019-07-25)

A robot by NTU Singapore autonomously assembles an IKEA chair
Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, have developed a robot that can autonomously assemble IKEA's Stefan chair in 8 minutes and 55 seconds. (2018-04-18)

Robotic implants spur tissue regeneration inside the body
An implanted, programmable medical robot can gradually lengthen tubular organs by applying traction forces -- stimulating tissue growth in stunted organs without interfering with organ function or causing apparent discomfort, report researchers at Boston Children's Hospital. (2018-01-10)

Lymph node surgery may raise risk of arm morbidity in younger women
Younger breast cancer patients who underwent axillary lymph node dissection were more likely to experience arm swelling and decreased range of arm motion than patients who received sentinel lymph node biopsies, according to data presented at the 2017 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 5-9. (2017-12-08)

Software enables robots to be controlled in virtual reality
Brown University researchers have developed software that lets users control robots over the internet with off-the-shelf virtual reality hardware. (2017-12-14)

Higher-dose RT lowers risk of recurrence but does not improve survival for men with prostate cancer
Results of a recent NRG Oncology study, NRG Oncology/RTOG 0126, show that high-dose radiotherapy did not improve survival for men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer but did improve biochemical control and rates of distant metastases, when compared to standard radiotherapy. Men who received higher-dose radiotherapy underwent fewer salvage therapies to control tumors that had grown larger or had spread to another body site; however, they also experienced more side effects than did men on the standard radiotherapy treatment arm. (2018-03-23)

Teaching chores to an AI
Recently, computer scientists have been working on teaching machines to do a wider range of tasks around the house. In a new paper spearheaded by MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) and the University of Toronto, researchers demonstrate 'VirtualHome,' a system that can simulate detailed household tasks and then have artificial 'agents' execute them, opening up the possibility of one day teaching robots to do such tasks. (2018-05-30)

New research on the brain's backup motor systems could open door to novel stroke therapies
New research published in the Journal of Physiology could open the door to new therapies to improve the movement of arms and hands of stroke survivors. (2018-02-14)

First direct observations of methane's increasing greenhouse effect at the Earth's surface
Scientists have directly measured the increasing greenhouse effect of methane at the Earth's surface for the first time. A research team from the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) tracked a rise in the warming effect of methane - one of the most important greenhouse gases for the Earth's atmosphere - over a 10-year period at a DOE field observation site in northern Oklahoma. (2018-04-02)

Researchers demonstrate new ways to achieve selectivity for biomarkers in bioelectronics
Two UA materials science and engineering researchers have experimentally verified the electrochemical processes that control charge transfer rate from an organic polymer to a biomarker molecule. Their findings, reported in Nature Communications, may enhance selectivity for biomarkers in bioelectronic devices. (2017-10-19)

Artificial 'skin' gives robotic hand a sense of touch
A team of researchers from the University of Houston has reported a breakthrough in stretchable electronics that can serve as an artificial skin, allowing a robotic hand to sense the difference between hot and cold, while also offering advantages for a wide range of biomedical devices. (2017-09-13)

Giving robots a more nimble grasp
Engineers at MIT have now hit upon a way to impart more dexterity to simple robotic grippers: using the environment as a helping hand. The team, led by Alberto Rodriguez, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering, and graduate student Nikhil Chavan-Dafle, has developed a model that predicts the force with which a robotic gripper needs to push against various fixtures in the environment in order to adjust its grasp on an object. (2015-08-04)

Patients more likely to accept robotic dentistry for non-invasive procedures
In an online survey of 502 individuals (260 female), participants were 'significantly less willing to undergo more invasive procedures, such as gum surgery and a root canal, and significantly more willing to undergo procedures such as tooth cleaning or whitening performed by a robot,' Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University researchers said. (2018-03-27)

Just hours apart, 2 brothers undergo robotic prostate cancer surgery
Two brothers from Savannah, Georgia diagnosed with prostate cancer flew to The Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York to have lifesaving surgery on the same day this week. Dr. David B. Samadi, MD, Chief of Robotics and Minimally Invasive Surgery in the Department of Urology at Mount Sinai successfully performed the robotic prostate cancer surgeries on the siblings one after another on Monday, Jan. 14, 2008. (2008-01-17)

Minimally invasive surgery associated with worse survival for women with cervical cancer compared to open hysterectomy
When comparing standard-of-care surgical options for women with early-stage cervical cancer, two studies led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center discovered that minimally invasive radical hysterectomy is associated with higher recurrence rates and worse overall survival (OS), compared to abdominal radical hysterectomy. (2018-10-31)

Piecework at the nano assembly line
Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed a novel electric propulsion technology for nanorobots. It allows molecular machines to move a hundred thousand times faster than with the biochemical processes used to date. This makes nanobots fast enough to do assembly line work in molecular factories. The new research results will appear as the cover story on 19th January in the renowned scientific journal Science. (2018-01-19)

Lifestyle intervention helped breast cancer survivors lose weight
Survivors of early-stage breast cancer who participated in a lifestyle intervention on healthy habits lost weight and experienced higher rates of disease-free survival if they completed the program, according to results presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. (2018-12-07)

Osteoporosis drug may benefit heart health
The osteoporosis drug alendronate was linked with a reduced risk of cardiovascular death, heart attack, and stroke in a Journal of Bone and Mineral Research study of patients with hip fractures. (2018-05-11)

The robots will see you now
Researchers tapped advances in real-time tracking software and robotics to design and test the first closed-loop control system featuring a bioinspired robotic replica interacting in three dimensions with live zebrafish. The system allows the robotic replica to both 'see' and mimic the behavior of live zebrafish in real time. Robots previously have been deployed alongside live animals to better understand animal behavior but the encounters were unidirectional. (2018-02-07)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.